Wednesday 18th June 2014

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Adam Barber
June 18, 2014
This content is from our archive. Some formatting or links may be broken.
This content is from our archive. Some formatting or links may be broken.
Wednesday 18th June 2014

UK approves 1.2GW offshore giant

The UK government has given permission to Scottish Power Renewables and Vattenfall to build one of the world’s largest offshore wind farms.

The Department of Energy and Climate Change granted consent yesterday for the £520m 1.2GW East Anglia One project off the coast of Suffolk. The project is a 50:50 joint venture between Scottish Power Renewables and Vattenfall.

The project is planned to be almost double the size of the world’s current largest offshore wind farm, the 630MW London Array. Construction on the 240-turbine scheme is due to start in 2017 and generation is scheduled to start in 2019.

First Flight shrinks 600MW Irish Sea plan

First Flight Wind has scaled back capacity at its proposed 600MW wind farm off the coast of Northern Ireland to between 300MW and 400MW.

First Flight, a consortium of B9 Energy, Dong Energy and Renewable Energy Systems (RES), has cut the size of the project to reduce the impact on shipping and fisheries. The development is planned in the Irish Sea, near County Down.

The partners are conducting environmental, technical and engineering studies until the end of 2015 and win consent during 2016. Construction is scheduled to start in 2018 and reach completion by the end of 2020.

Continuum orders 170MW from Inox

Continuum Wind Energy has ordered 170MW of turbines from Inox Wind for a project in the Ratlam and Mandsaur districts in the state of Madhya Pradesh.

The Singapore-based investor, which is indirectly majority-owned by Morgan Stanley Infrastructure Partners, ordered 85 turbines from Inox, which is a subsidiary of Gujarat Fluorochemicals.

The deal for the 2MW turbines is worth an estimated $150m. Continuum has not yet revealed any further details about the project.

Santander funds 118MW for Rame in Chile

Santander is to provide $69m of equity financing for Rame Energy’s next four projects in Chile, which are intended to have a total capacity of 118MW.

The UK-based energy consultant announced that it has signed an exclusive framework agreement with the Spanish bank, but it did not give further details about the four projects. This builds on Santander’s previous agreement to co-finance Rame’s first two wind projects in Chile, with a total capacity of 15MW.

In this agreement, Santander would acquire each project for an agreed price per MW, and provide between 80% and 90% of required equity capital for them. Rame will contribute the rest of the equity and Santander will structure debt packages.

Siemens and MHI confirm joint Alstom offer

Siemens and Mitsubishi Heavy Industries (MHI) have confirmed that their bid for Alstom’s energy assets does not include the French firm’s wind and renewables.

The pair submitted a joint bid for some of Alstom’s assets on Monday. It would involve the sale of Alstom’s gas assets to Siemens, and an alliance between MHI and Alstom. MHI formally set up a joint venture with Denmark's Vestas in April.

Siemens and MHI said their plan was superior to the existing bid by US giant General Electric (GE), which also does not include Alstom’s wind assets. The French government has said it wanted French firm Areva to buy Alstom’s wind assets if GE’s bid is successful.

GE has given Alstom until Monday to decide whether to accept its offer.

UK approves 1.2GW offshore giant

The UK government has given permission to Scottish Power Renewables and Vattenfall to build one of the world’s largest offshore wind farms.

The Department of Energy and Climate Change granted consent yesterday for the £520m 1.2GW East Anglia One project off the coast of Suffolk. The project is a 50:50 joint venture between Scottish Power Renewables and Vattenfall.

The project is planned to be almost double the size of the world’s current largest offshore wind farm, the 630MW London Array. Construction on the 240-turbine scheme is due to start in 2017 and generation is scheduled to start in 2019.

First Flight shrinks 600MW Irish Sea plan

First Flight Wind has scaled back capacity at its proposed 600MW wind farm off the coast of Northern Ireland to between 300MW and 400MW.

First Flight, a consortium of B9 Energy, Dong Energy and Renewable Energy Systems (RES), has cut the size of the project to reduce the impact on shipping and fisheries. The development is planned in the Irish Sea, near County Down.

The partners are conducting environmental, technical and engineering studies until the end of 2015 and win consent during 2016. Construction is scheduled to start in 2018 and reach completion by the end of 2020.

Continuum orders 170MW from Inox

Continuum Wind Energy has ordered 170MW of turbines from Inox Wind for a project in the Ratlam and Mandsaur districts in the state of Madhya Pradesh.

The Singapore-based investor, which is indirectly majority-owned by Morgan Stanley Infrastructure Partners, ordered 85 turbines from Inox, which is a subsidiary of Gujarat Fluorochemicals.

The deal for the 2MW turbines is worth an estimated $150m. Continuum has not yet revealed any further details about the project.

Santander funds 118MW for Rame in Chile

Santander is to provide $69m of equity financing for Rame Energy’s next four projects in Chile, which are intended to have a total capacity of 118MW.

The UK-based energy consultant announced that it has signed an exclusive framework agreement with the Spanish bank, but it did not give further details about the four projects. This builds on Santander’s previous agreement to co-finance Rame’s first two wind projects in Chile, with a total capacity of 15MW.

In this agreement, Santander would acquire each project for an agreed price per MW, and provide between 80% and 90% of required equity capital for them. Rame will contribute the rest of the equity and Santander will structure debt packages.

Siemens and MHI confirm joint Alstom offer

Siemens and Mitsubishi Heavy Industries (MHI) have confirmed that their bid for Alstom’s energy assets does not include the French firm’s wind and renewables.

The pair submitted a joint bid for some of Alstom’s assets on Monday. It would involve the sale of Alstom’s gas assets to Siemens, and an alliance between MHI and Alstom. MHI formally set up a joint venture with Denmark's Vestas in April.

Siemens and MHI said their plan was superior to the existing bid by US giant General Electric (GE), which also does not include Alstom’s wind assets. The French government has said it wanted French firm Areva to buy Alstom’s wind assets if GE’s bid is successful.

GE has given Alstom until Monday to decide whether to accept its offer.

UK approves 1.2GW offshore giant

The UK government has given permission to Scottish Power Renewables and Vattenfall to build one of the world’s largest offshore wind farms.

The Department of Energy and Climate Change granted consent yesterday for the £520m 1.2GW East Anglia One project off the coast of Suffolk. The project is a 50:50 joint venture between Scottish Power Renewables and Vattenfall.

The project is planned to be almost double the size of the world’s current largest offshore wind farm, the 630MW London Array. Construction on the 240-turbine scheme is due to start in 2017 and generation is scheduled to start in 2019.

First Flight shrinks 600MW Irish Sea plan

First Flight Wind has scaled back capacity at its proposed 600MW wind farm off the coast of Northern Ireland to between 300MW and 400MW.

First Flight, a consortium of B9 Energy, Dong Energy and Renewable Energy Systems (RES), has cut the size of the project to reduce the impact on shipping and fisheries. The development is planned in the Irish Sea, near County Down.

The partners are conducting environmental, technical and engineering studies until the end of 2015 and win consent during 2016. Construction is scheduled to start in 2018 and reach completion by the end of 2020.

Continuum orders 170MW from Inox

Continuum Wind Energy has ordered 170MW of turbines from Inox Wind for a project in the Ratlam and Mandsaur districts in the state of Madhya Pradesh.

The Singapore-based investor, which is indirectly majority-owned by Morgan Stanley Infrastructure Partners, ordered 85 turbines from Inox, which is a subsidiary of Gujarat Fluorochemicals.

The deal for the 2MW turbines is worth an estimated $150m. Continuum has not yet revealed any further details about the project.

Santander funds 118MW for Rame in Chile

Santander is to provide $69m of equity financing for Rame Energy’s next four projects in Chile, which are intended to have a total capacity of 118MW.

The UK-based energy consultant announced that it has signed an exclusive framework agreement with the Spanish bank, but it did not give further details about the four projects. This builds on Santander’s previous agreement to co-finance Rame’s first two wind projects in Chile, with a total capacity of 15MW.

In this agreement, Santander would acquire each project for an agreed price per MW, and provide between 80% and 90% of required equity capital for them. Rame will contribute the rest of the equity and Santander will structure debt packages.

Siemens and MHI confirm joint Alstom offer

Siemens and Mitsubishi Heavy Industries (MHI) have confirmed that their bid for Alstom’s energy assets does not include the French firm’s wind and renewables.

The pair submitted a joint bid for some of Alstom’s assets on Monday. It would involve the sale of Alstom’s gas assets to Siemens, and an alliance between MHI and Alstom. MHI formally set up a joint venture with Denmark's Vestas in April.

Siemens and MHI said their plan was superior to the existing bid by US giant General Electric (GE), which also does not include Alstom’s wind assets. The French government has said it wanted French firm Areva to buy Alstom’s wind assets if GE’s bid is successful.

GE has given Alstom until Monday to decide whether to accept its offer.

UK approves 1.2GW offshore giant

The UK government has given permission to Scottish Power Renewables and Vattenfall to build one of the world’s largest offshore wind farms.

The Department of Energy and Climate Change granted consent yesterday for the £520m 1.2GW East Anglia One project off the coast of Suffolk. The project is a 50:50 joint venture between Scottish Power Renewables and Vattenfall.

The project is planned to be almost double the size of the world’s current largest offshore wind farm, the 630MW London Array. Construction on the 240-turbine scheme is due to start in 2017 and generation is scheduled to start in 2019.

First Flight shrinks 600MW Irish Sea plan

First Flight Wind has scaled back capacity at its proposed 600MW wind farm off the coast of Northern Ireland to between 300MW and 400MW.

First Flight, a consortium of B9 Energy, Dong Energy and Renewable Energy Systems (RES), has cut the size of the project to reduce the impact on shipping and fisheries. The development is planned in the Irish Sea, near County Down.

The partners are conducting environmental, technical and engineering studies until the end of 2015 and win consent during 2016. Construction is scheduled to start in 2018 and reach completion by the end of 2020.

Continuum orders 170MW from Inox

Continuum Wind Energy has ordered 170MW of turbines from Inox Wind for a project in the Ratlam and Mandsaur districts in the state of Madhya Pradesh.

The Singapore-based investor, which is indirectly majority-owned by Morgan Stanley Infrastructure Partners, ordered 85 turbines from Inox, which is a subsidiary of Gujarat Fluorochemicals.

The deal for the 2MW turbines is worth an estimated $150m. Continuum has not yet revealed any further details about the project.

Santander funds 118MW for Rame in Chile

Santander is to provide $69m of equity financing for Rame Energy’s next four projects in Chile, which are intended to have a total capacity of 118MW.

The UK-based energy consultant announced that it has signed an exclusive framework agreement with the Spanish bank, but it did not give further details about the four projects. This builds on Santander’s previous agreement to co-finance Rame’s first two wind projects in Chile, with a total capacity of 15MW.

In this agreement, Santander would acquire each project for an agreed price per MW, and provide between 80% and 90% of required equity capital for them. Rame will contribute the rest of the equity and Santander will structure debt packages.

Siemens and MHI confirm joint Alstom offer

Siemens and Mitsubishi Heavy Industries (MHI) have confirmed that their bid for Alstom’s energy assets does not include the French firm’s wind and renewables.

The pair submitted a joint bid for some of Alstom’s assets on Monday. It would involve the sale of Alstom’s gas assets to Siemens, and an alliance between MHI and Alstom. MHI formally set up a joint venture with Denmark's Vestas in April.

Siemens and MHI said their plan was superior to the existing bid by US giant General Electric (GE), which also does not include Alstom’s wind assets. The French government has said it wanted French firm Areva to buy Alstom’s wind assets if GE’s bid is successful.

GE has given Alstom until Monday to decide whether to accept its offer.

UK approves 1.2GW offshore giant

The UK government has given permission to Scottish Power Renewables and Vattenfall to build one of the world’s largest offshore wind farms.

The Department of Energy and Climate Change granted consent yesterday for the £520m 1.2GW East Anglia One project off the coast of Suffolk. The project is a 50:50 joint venture between Scottish Power Renewables and Vattenfall.

The project is planned to be almost double the size of the world’s current largest offshore wind farm, the 630MW London Array. Construction on the 240-turbine scheme is due to start in 2017 and generation is scheduled to start in 2019.

First Flight shrinks 600MW Irish Sea plan

First Flight Wind has scaled back capacity at its proposed 600MW wind farm off the coast of Northern Ireland to between 300MW and 400MW.

First Flight, a consortium of B9 Energy, Dong Energy and Renewable Energy Systems (RES), has cut the size of the project to reduce the impact on shipping and fisheries. The development is planned in the Irish Sea, near County Down.

The partners are conducting environmental, technical and engineering studies until the end of 2015 and win consent during 2016. Construction is scheduled to start in 2018 and reach completion by the end of 2020.

Continuum orders 170MW from Inox

Continuum Wind Energy has ordered 170MW of turbines from Inox Wind for a project in the Ratlam and Mandsaur districts in the state of Madhya Pradesh.

The Singapore-based investor, which is indirectly majority-owned by Morgan Stanley Infrastructure Partners, ordered 85 turbines from Inox, which is a subsidiary of Gujarat Fluorochemicals.

The deal for the 2MW turbines is worth an estimated $150m. Continuum has not yet revealed any further details about the project.

Santander funds 118MW for Rame in Chile

Santander is to provide $69m of equity financing for Rame Energy’s next four projects in Chile, which are intended to have a total capacity of 118MW.

The UK-based energy consultant announced that it has signed an exclusive framework agreement with the Spanish bank, but it did not give further details about the four projects. This builds on Santander’s previous agreement to co-finance Rame’s first two wind projects in Chile, with a total capacity of 15MW.

In this agreement, Santander would acquire each project for an agreed price per MW, and provide between 80% and 90% of required equity capital for them. Rame will contribute the rest of the equity and Santander will structure debt packages.

Siemens and MHI confirm joint Alstom offer

Siemens and Mitsubishi Heavy Industries (MHI) have confirmed that their bid for Alstom’s energy assets does not include the French firm’s wind and renewables.

The pair submitted a joint bid for some of Alstom’s assets on Monday. It would involve the sale of Alstom’s gas assets to Siemens, and an alliance between MHI and Alstom. MHI formally set up a joint venture with Denmark's Vestas in April.

Siemens and MHI said their plan was superior to the existing bid by US giant General Electric (GE), which also does not include Alstom’s wind assets. The French government has said it wanted French firm Areva to buy Alstom’s wind assets if GE’s bid is successful.

GE has given Alstom until Monday to decide whether to accept its offer.

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Full archive access is available to members only

Not a member yet?

Become a member of the 6,500-strong A Word About Wind community today, and gain access to our premium content, exclusive lead generation and investment opportunities.