Wednesday 14th June 2017

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Richard Heap
June 14, 2017
This content is from our archive. Some formatting or links may be broken.
This content is from our archive. Some formatting or links may be broken.
Wednesday 14th June 2017

RSPB eyes 2.3GW Supreme Court fight

Bird charity RSPB is looking to take its fight against four projects totalling 2.3GW in Scotland's waters to the Supreme Court.

The charity is set to appeal a judgment last month by the Scottish Court of Session that construction could start on the four projects, which overturned a decision last July in favour of the charity. RSPB is concerned about the impact of the projects on birdlife.

The four affected schemes are Mainstream Renewable Power’s 450MW Neart na Gaoithe; Chinese Red Rock Power’s 784MW Inch Cape; and Seagreen Alpha and Bravo of 525MW each, to be developed by a joint venture of Fluor and SSE. The schemes were originally granted planning permission in October 2014.

Shell in frame for Adwen buyout

Shell is reportedly considering a bid to buy offshore turbine maker Adwen to add to its project pipeline and technology offer.

The oil and gas giant is one of a number of companies said to be mulling a bid for Adwen, which is developing an 8MW turbine and has a 1.5GW portfolio of projects in French waters. It is part of Siemens Gamesa Renewable Energy and currently restructuring. None of the parties has commented on the reports.

Shell led a group that won the right in December to develop the 700MW Borssele 3 and 4 projects in Dutch waters.

Want more? Read our blog for up-to-date offshore wind analysis

Estonians win 1.1GW offshore backing

Estonian duo Nelja Energia and Hiiumaa Offshore Tuulepark are set to work with a local municipality on a 1.1GW offshore project.

The Estonian municipality of Hiiu has agreed to cooperate with the pair on the scheme. Nelja and Hiiumaa signed a letter of intent three years ago to develop a wind farm off the coast of the island of Hiiumaa. The region said this is now “a binding agreement”.

No further details about the project have been disclosed but the residents of Hiiu municipality will be able to invest in the wind farm by buying shares or bonds with a fixed annual interest of 15%.

Tennet in new €1bn green bond issue

Dutch grid firm Tennet has issued €1bn more green bonds so it can invest in Germany's offshore wind transmission network.

The issue consists of two €500m tranches, maturing in eight years and 12 years respectively. With the proceeds, the company plans to finance the transmission lines for eight offshore wind projects in the German North Sea, with total capacity of over 6GW.

Tennet expects to realise over 7GW of connection capacity for offshore wind by 2019; and to invest up to €11bn in offshore wind projects in Germany and the Netherlands in the next ten years.

RES places 429MW order with Senvion

RES Australia has chosen Senvion to supply 116 turbines to its 429MW Murra Warra wind farm in Victoria, Australia.

Senvion is set to supply 116 of its 3.7M144 turbine, which has been designed specifically for the project. The German turbine maker has also agreed to partner with Australian firm Downer on early works for the project, which has not reached financial close.

The Murra Warra wind farm was granted planning consent by
the Victorian government in December 2016. Victoria state has set renewable energy targets of 25% by 2020 and 40% by 2025.

Wind Watch

Wind Watch is published every Monday and Friday.

In the meantime, have you checked out the latest posts on our blog? If not, you should. This is where we put the analysis that we can't fit in our newsletters and special reports.


You can read all of our blog posts for free, including our exclusive online insight into last week's Offshore Wind Energy conference!

Here is a taste of our post with the reflections on the first day of the conference. Find out more here.

OWE 2017: Reflections on the first day
By Richard Heap

In our newsletter on Monday we highlighted five of the major talking points we expected to see at the Offshore Wind Energy 2017 conference, run by WindEurope and RenewableUK, in London this week.

And, at the end of the first day, all have featured heavily. Here are our thoughts on what we have heard on these topics so far:

Zero-subsidy developments: These were always going to be a big talking point, and it was great to hear Dong Energy’s offshore CEO Samuel Leupold give more rationale on how its three winning projects in Germany’s offshore wind auction were possible.

In short, it is a combination of faith in the evolution of turbines; long-term support offered by the German government; and the direction of power prices across Europe.

However, it is clear that, for the time being, zero-subsidy projects in Germany are the result of a unique set of circumstances and we should not expect them to be a general feature of the market by 2020. There will need to be more innovation across the supply chain if these projects are to be financially viable – and the industry’s plan to build 60GW of offshore wind farms in Europe in the 2020s would help with that.

RSPB eyes 2.3GW Supreme Court fight

Bird charity RSPB is looking to take its fight against four projects totalling 2.3GW in Scotland's waters to the Supreme Court.

The charity is set to appeal a judgment last month by the Scottish Court of Session that construction could start on the four projects, which overturned a decision last July in favour of the charity. RSPB is concerned about the impact of the projects on birdlife.

The four affected schemes are Mainstream Renewable Power’s 450MW Neart na Gaoithe; Chinese Red Rock Power’s 784MW Inch Cape; and Seagreen Alpha and Bravo of 525MW each, to be developed by a joint venture of Fluor and SSE. The schemes were originally granted planning permission in October 2014.

Shell in frame for Adwen buyout

Shell is reportedly considering a bid to buy offshore turbine maker Adwen to add to its project pipeline and technology offer.

The oil and gas giant is one of a number of companies said to be mulling a bid for Adwen, which is developing an 8MW turbine and has a 1.5GW portfolio of projects in French waters. It is part of Siemens Gamesa Renewable Energy and currently restructuring. None of the parties has commented on the reports.

Shell led a group that won the right in December to develop the 700MW Borssele 3 and 4 projects in Dutch waters.

Want more? Read our blog for up-to-date offshore wind analysis

Estonians win 1.1GW offshore backing

Estonian duo Nelja Energia and Hiiumaa Offshore Tuulepark are set to work with a local municipality on a 1.1GW offshore project.

The Estonian municipality of Hiiu has agreed to cooperate with the pair on the scheme. Nelja and Hiiumaa signed a letter of intent three years ago to develop a wind farm off the coast of the island of Hiiumaa. The region said this is now “a binding agreement”.

No further details about the project have been disclosed but the residents of Hiiu municipality will be able to invest in the wind farm by buying shares or bonds with a fixed annual interest of 15%.

Tennet in new €1bn green bond issue

Dutch grid firm Tennet has issued €1bn more green bonds so it can invest in Germany's offshore wind transmission network.

The issue consists of two €500m tranches, maturing in eight years and 12 years respectively. With the proceeds, the company plans to finance the transmission lines for eight offshore wind projects in the German North Sea, with total capacity of over 6GW.

Tennet expects to realise over 7GW of connection capacity for offshore wind by 2019; and to invest up to €11bn in offshore wind projects in Germany and the Netherlands in the next ten years.

RES places 429MW order with Senvion

RES Australia has chosen Senvion to supply 116 turbines to its 429MW Murra Warra wind farm in Victoria, Australia.

Senvion is set to supply 116 of its 3.7M144 turbine, which has been designed specifically for the project. The German turbine maker has also agreed to partner with Australian firm Downer on early works for the project, which has not reached financial close.

The Murra Warra wind farm was granted planning consent by
the Victorian government in December 2016. Victoria state has set renewable energy targets of 25% by 2020 and 40% by 2025.

Wind Watch

Wind Watch is published every Monday and Friday.

In the meantime, have you checked out the latest posts on our blog? If not, you should. This is where we put the analysis that we can't fit in our newsletters and special reports.


You can read all of our blog posts for free, including our exclusive online insight into last week's Offshore Wind Energy conference!

Here is a taste of our post with the reflections on the first day of the conference. Find out more here.

OWE 2017: Reflections on the first day
By Richard Heap

In our newsletter on Monday we highlighted five of the major talking points we expected to see at the Offshore Wind Energy 2017 conference, run by WindEurope and RenewableUK, in London this week.

And, at the end of the first day, all have featured heavily. Here are our thoughts on what we have heard on these topics so far:

Zero-subsidy developments: These were always going to be a big talking point, and it was great to hear Dong Energy’s offshore CEO Samuel Leupold give more rationale on how its three winning projects in Germany’s offshore wind auction were possible.

In short, it is a combination of faith in the evolution of turbines; long-term support offered by the German government; and the direction of power prices across Europe.

However, it is clear that, for the time being, zero-subsidy projects in Germany are the result of a unique set of circumstances and we should not expect them to be a general feature of the market by 2020. There will need to be more innovation across the supply chain if these projects are to be financially viable – and the industry’s plan to build 60GW of offshore wind farms in Europe in the 2020s would help with that.

RSPB eyes 2.3GW Supreme Court fight

Bird charity RSPB is looking to take its fight against four projects totalling 2.3GW in Scotland's waters to the Supreme Court.

The charity is set to appeal a judgment last month by the Scottish Court of Session that construction could start on the four projects, which overturned a decision last July in favour of the charity. RSPB is concerned about the impact of the projects on birdlife.

The four affected schemes are Mainstream Renewable Power’s 450MW Neart na Gaoithe; Chinese Red Rock Power’s 784MW Inch Cape; and Seagreen Alpha and Bravo of 525MW each, to be developed by a joint venture of Fluor and SSE. The schemes were originally granted planning permission in October 2014.

Shell in frame for Adwen buyout

Shell is reportedly considering a bid to buy offshore turbine maker Adwen to add to its project pipeline and technology offer.

The oil and gas giant is one of a number of companies said to be mulling a bid for Adwen, which is developing an 8MW turbine and has a 1.5GW portfolio of projects in French waters. It is part of Siemens Gamesa Renewable Energy and currently restructuring. None of the parties has commented on the reports.

Shell led a group that won the right in December to develop the 700MW Borssele 3 and 4 projects in Dutch waters.

Want more? Read our blog for up-to-date offshore wind analysis

Estonians win 1.1GW offshore backing

Estonian duo Nelja Energia and Hiiumaa Offshore Tuulepark are set to work with a local municipality on a 1.1GW offshore project.

The Estonian municipality of Hiiu has agreed to cooperate with the pair on the scheme. Nelja and Hiiumaa signed a letter of intent three years ago to develop a wind farm off the coast of the island of Hiiumaa. The region said this is now “a binding agreement”.

No further details about the project have been disclosed but the residents of Hiiu municipality will be able to invest in the wind farm by buying shares or bonds with a fixed annual interest of 15%.

Tennet in new €1bn green bond issue

Dutch grid firm Tennet has issued €1bn more green bonds so it can invest in Germany's offshore wind transmission network.

The issue consists of two €500m tranches, maturing in eight years and 12 years respectively. With the proceeds, the company plans to finance the transmission lines for eight offshore wind projects in the German North Sea, with total capacity of over 6GW.

Tennet expects to realise over 7GW of connection capacity for offshore wind by 2019; and to invest up to €11bn in offshore wind projects in Germany and the Netherlands in the next ten years.

RES places 429MW order with Senvion

RES Australia has chosen Senvion to supply 116 turbines to its 429MW Murra Warra wind farm in Victoria, Australia.

Senvion is set to supply 116 of its 3.7M144 turbine, which has been designed specifically for the project. The German turbine maker has also agreed to partner with Australian firm Downer on early works for the project, which has not reached financial close.

The Murra Warra wind farm was granted planning consent by
the Victorian government in December 2016. Victoria state has set renewable energy targets of 25% by 2020 and 40% by 2025.

Wind Watch

Wind Watch is published every Monday and Friday.

In the meantime, have you checked out the latest posts on our blog? If not, you should. This is where we put the analysis that we can't fit in our newsletters and special reports.


You can read all of our blog posts for free, including our exclusive online insight into last week's Offshore Wind Energy conference!

Here is a taste of our post with the reflections on the first day of the conference. Find out more here.

OWE 2017: Reflections on the first day
By Richard Heap

In our newsletter on Monday we highlighted five of the major talking points we expected to see at the Offshore Wind Energy 2017 conference, run by WindEurope and RenewableUK, in London this week.

And, at the end of the first day, all have featured heavily. Here are our thoughts on what we have heard on these topics so far:

Zero-subsidy developments: These were always going to be a big talking point, and it was great to hear Dong Energy’s offshore CEO Samuel Leupold give more rationale on how its three winning projects in Germany’s offshore wind auction were possible.

In short, it is a combination of faith in the evolution of turbines; long-term support offered by the German government; and the direction of power prices across Europe.

However, it is clear that, for the time being, zero-subsidy projects in Germany are the result of a unique set of circumstances and we should not expect them to be a general feature of the market by 2020. There will need to be more innovation across the supply chain if these projects are to be financially viable – and the industry’s plan to build 60GW of offshore wind farms in Europe in the 2020s would help with that.

RSPB eyes 2.3GW Supreme Court fight

Bird charity RSPB is looking to take its fight against four projects totalling 2.3GW in Scotland's waters to the Supreme Court.

The charity is set to appeal a judgment last month by the Scottish Court of Session that construction could start on the four projects, which overturned a decision last July in favour of the charity. RSPB is concerned about the impact of the projects on birdlife.

The four affected schemes are Mainstream Renewable Power’s 450MW Neart na Gaoithe; Chinese Red Rock Power’s 784MW Inch Cape; and Seagreen Alpha and Bravo of 525MW each, to be developed by a joint venture of Fluor and SSE. The schemes were originally granted planning permission in October 2014.

Shell in frame for Adwen buyout

Shell is reportedly considering a bid to buy offshore turbine maker Adwen to add to its project pipeline and technology offer.

The oil and gas giant is one of a number of companies said to be mulling a bid for Adwen, which is developing an 8MW turbine and has a 1.5GW portfolio of projects in French waters. It is part of Siemens Gamesa Renewable Energy and currently restructuring. None of the parties has commented on the reports.

Shell led a group that won the right in December to develop the 700MW Borssele 3 and 4 projects in Dutch waters.

Want more? Read our blog for up-to-date offshore wind analysis

Estonians win 1.1GW offshore backing

Estonian duo Nelja Energia and Hiiumaa Offshore Tuulepark are set to work with a local municipality on a 1.1GW offshore project.

The Estonian municipality of Hiiu has agreed to cooperate with the pair on the scheme. Nelja and Hiiumaa signed a letter of intent three years ago to develop a wind farm off the coast of the island of Hiiumaa. The region said this is now “a binding agreement”.

No further details about the project have been disclosed but the residents of Hiiu municipality will be able to invest in the wind farm by buying shares or bonds with a fixed annual interest of 15%.

Tennet in new €1bn green bond issue

Dutch grid firm Tennet has issued €1bn more green bonds so it can invest in Germany's offshore wind transmission network.

The issue consists of two €500m tranches, maturing in eight years and 12 years respectively. With the proceeds, the company plans to finance the transmission lines for eight offshore wind projects in the German North Sea, with total capacity of over 6GW.

Tennet expects to realise over 7GW of connection capacity for offshore wind by 2019; and to invest up to €11bn in offshore wind projects in Germany and the Netherlands in the next ten years.

RES places 429MW order with Senvion

RES Australia has chosen Senvion to supply 116 turbines to its 429MW Murra Warra wind farm in Victoria, Australia.

Senvion is set to supply 116 of its 3.7M144 turbine, which has been designed specifically for the project. The German turbine maker has also agreed to partner with Australian firm Downer on early works for the project, which has not reached financial close.

The Murra Warra wind farm was granted planning consent by
the Victorian government in December 2016. Victoria state has set renewable energy targets of 25% by 2020 and 40% by 2025.

Wind Watch

Wind Watch is published every Monday and Friday.

In the meantime, have you checked out the latest posts on our blog? If not, you should. This is where we put the analysis that we can't fit in our newsletters and special reports.


You can read all of our blog posts for free, including our exclusive online insight into last week's Offshore Wind Energy conference!

Here is a taste of our post with the reflections on the first day of the conference. Find out more here.

OWE 2017: Reflections on the first day
By Richard Heap

In our newsletter on Monday we highlighted five of the major talking points we expected to see at the Offshore Wind Energy 2017 conference, run by WindEurope and RenewableUK, in London this week.

And, at the end of the first day, all have featured heavily. Here are our thoughts on what we have heard on these topics so far:

Zero-subsidy developments: These were always going to be a big talking point, and it was great to hear Dong Energy’s offshore CEO Samuel Leupold give more rationale on how its three winning projects in Germany’s offshore wind auction were possible.

In short, it is a combination of faith in the evolution of turbines; long-term support offered by the German government; and the direction of power prices across Europe.

However, it is clear that, for the time being, zero-subsidy projects in Germany are the result of a unique set of circumstances and we should not expect them to be a general feature of the market by 2020. There will need to be more innovation across the supply chain if these projects are to be financially viable – and the industry’s plan to build 60GW of offshore wind farms in Europe in the 2020s would help with that.

RSPB eyes 2.3GW Supreme Court fight

Bird charity RSPB is looking to take its fight against four projects totalling 2.3GW in Scotland's waters to the Supreme Court.

The charity is set to appeal a judgment last month by the Scottish Court of Session that construction could start on the four projects, which overturned a decision last July in favour of the charity. RSPB is concerned about the impact of the projects on birdlife.

The four affected schemes are Mainstream Renewable Power’s 450MW Neart na Gaoithe; Chinese Red Rock Power’s 784MW Inch Cape; and Seagreen Alpha and Bravo of 525MW each, to be developed by a joint venture of Fluor and SSE. The schemes were originally granted planning permission in October 2014.

Shell in frame for Adwen buyout

Shell is reportedly considering a bid to buy offshore turbine maker Adwen to add to its project pipeline and technology offer.

The oil and gas giant is one of a number of companies said to be mulling a bid for Adwen, which is developing an 8MW turbine and has a 1.5GW portfolio of projects in French waters. It is part of Siemens Gamesa Renewable Energy and currently restructuring. None of the parties has commented on the reports.

Shell led a group that won the right in December to develop the 700MW Borssele 3 and 4 projects in Dutch waters.

Want more? Read our blog for up-to-date offshore wind analysis

Estonians win 1.1GW offshore backing

Estonian duo Nelja Energia and Hiiumaa Offshore Tuulepark are set to work with a local municipality on a 1.1GW offshore project.

The Estonian municipality of Hiiu has agreed to cooperate with the pair on the scheme. Nelja and Hiiumaa signed a letter of intent three years ago to develop a wind farm off the coast of the island of Hiiumaa. The region said this is now “a binding agreement”.

No further details about the project have been disclosed but the residents of Hiiu municipality will be able to invest in the wind farm by buying shares or bonds with a fixed annual interest of 15%.

Tennet in new €1bn green bond issue

Dutch grid firm Tennet has issued €1bn more green bonds so it can invest in Germany's offshore wind transmission network.

The issue consists of two €500m tranches, maturing in eight years and 12 years respectively. With the proceeds, the company plans to finance the transmission lines for eight offshore wind projects in the German North Sea, with total capacity of over 6GW.

Tennet expects to realise over 7GW of connection capacity for offshore wind by 2019; and to invest up to €11bn in offshore wind projects in Germany and the Netherlands in the next ten years.

RES places 429MW order with Senvion

RES Australia has chosen Senvion to supply 116 turbines to its 429MW Murra Warra wind farm in Victoria, Australia.

Senvion is set to supply 116 of its 3.7M144 turbine, which has been designed specifically for the project. The German turbine maker has also agreed to partner with Australian firm Downer on early works for the project, which has not reached financial close.

The Murra Warra wind farm was granted planning consent by
the Victorian government in December 2016. Victoria state has set renewable energy targets of 25% by 2020 and 40% by 2025.

Wind Watch

Wind Watch is published every Monday and Friday.

In the meantime, have you checked out the latest posts on our blog? If not, you should. This is where we put the analysis that we can't fit in our newsletters and special reports.


You can read all of our blog posts for free, including our exclusive online insight into last week's Offshore Wind Energy conference!

Here is a taste of our post with the reflections on the first day of the conference. Find out more here.

OWE 2017: Reflections on the first day
By Richard Heap

In our newsletter on Monday we highlighted five of the major talking points we expected to see at the Offshore Wind Energy 2017 conference, run by WindEurope and RenewableUK, in London this week.

And, at the end of the first day, all have featured heavily. Here are our thoughts on what we have heard on these topics so far:

Zero-subsidy developments: These were always going to be a big talking point, and it was great to hear Dong Energy’s offshore CEO Samuel Leupold give more rationale on how its three winning projects in Germany’s offshore wind auction were possible.

In short, it is a combination of faith in the evolution of turbines; long-term support offered by the German government; and the direction of power prices across Europe.

However, it is clear that, for the time being, zero-subsidy projects in Germany are the result of a unique set of circumstances and we should not expect them to be a general feature of the market by 2020. There will need to be more innovation across the supply chain if these projects are to be financially viable – and the industry’s plan to build 60GW of offshore wind farms in Europe in the 2020s would help with that.

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Full archive access is available to members only

Not a member yet?

Become a member of the 6,500-strong A Word About Wind community today, and gain access to our premium content, exclusive lead generation and investment opportunities.