US: When should wind worry about Trump?

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Richard Heap
February 29, 2016
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This content is from our archive. Some formatting or links may be broken.
US: When should wind worry about Trump?

When is the right time to start worrying about Donald Trump?

This time last year we thought the chance of Trump standing in the race to become the Republican candidate in the US presidential race was slim. He said he was “seriously thinking” about it as he has done before, so we dismissed it as publicity-seeking bravado.

How wrong we were. Not only did the brash billionaire enter the race, but he heads into tomorrow’s Super Tuesday leading it.

Twelve states are due to hold Republican primaries tomorrow and there are 595 delegates at stake. His supporters will hope that he confirms his status as the party’s presidential nominee, while his opponents will hope that Ted Cruz or Marco Rubio continue the fight with supporters from fallen rivals like Jeb Bush.

If we end up with President Trump after 8 November then it could be a disaster for wind. He is arguably the world’s most high-profile NIMBY because of his long legal battle against a 100MW scheme off the coast of Scotland. He lost a legal action against the project in the UK’s Supreme Court in December, and now plans to go to the European Court of Justice.

US wind investors should be worried too. Trump has repeatedly denied the science behind climate change, and says oil is the “lifeblood” of the US economy. In contrast, he says that wind turbines are ugly, inefficient bird-killers that harm human health. You know, the usual.

Trump appears to have thawed to wind a bit this campaign saying that he supports wind subsidies, particularly when oil prices are high, but he was being quizzed at the time by an Iowa voter whose husband works in wind. We won’t take his statement at face value.

So the prospects for wind do not look good under Trump, but here’s the thing: they do not look any better under Cruz or Rubio.

Cruz does not believe in man-made climate change; opposes wind and solar development; and sees no point creating jobs in green energy. He says wind should compete on a level playing field with other forms of energy — which really means wind should compete without any subsidies against heavily-subsidised fossil fuels firms.

And Rubio is no better. He does not believe in man-made climate change and wants more investment in fossil fuels. He has said that he wants the US to lead the world in everything, including wind and solar, but his plan for doing that is to remove renewable energy support and let the market decide. He isn’t going to lead the world in wind with a plan like that, but we don't believe he really wants to.

The other point worth noting here is that Trump is actually far more liberal that his rivals on a lot of issues. He has vowed to protect Medicare and Social Security Entitlements from cuts. As a result, for wind, Trump looks the best of a bad bunch.

But that is not to say that we want to see Trump in charge.

The Democrat candidates Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders are both more pro-renewables than any of the Republicans. Clinton wants the US to be a “clean energy superpower”, and Sanders wants to boost the investment in renewables while also repealing subsidies for the fossil fuels sector.

And, on balance, we do not want Trump as the Republican candidate either. He may be slightly more sympathetic to wind than his Republican rivals, but he is also a charismatic candidate who is more likely to take wavering voters away from the Democrats. And the best prospect for wind is a Democrat in the White House.

But what if he does win the presidency? Well, out of the five candidates still in the running, he looks like the third-best result for wind. If that does not give a sense of what is at stake for wind in this November's election, we don't know what will.

The wind industry should not worry about Trump just yet — but, if he dominates Super Tuesday, it will be fine to start getting jittery.

When is the right time to start worrying about Donald Trump?

This time last year we thought the chance of Trump standing in the race to become the Republican candidate in the US presidential race was slim. He said he was “seriously thinking” about it as he has done before, so we dismissed it as publicity-seeking bravado.

How wrong we were. Not only did the brash billionaire enter the race, but he heads into tomorrow’s Super Tuesday leading it.

Twelve states are due to hold Republican primaries tomorrow and there are 595 delegates at stake. His supporters will hope that he confirms his status as the party’s presidential nominee, while his opponents will hope that Ted Cruz or Marco Rubio continue the fight with supporters from fallen rivals like Jeb Bush.

If we end up with President Trump after 8 November then it could be a disaster for wind. He is arguably the world’s most high-profile NIMBY because of his long legal battle against a 100MW scheme off the coast of Scotland. He lost a legal action against the project in the UK’s Supreme Court in December, and now plans to go to the European Court of Justice.

US wind investors should be worried too. Trump has repeatedly denied the science behind climate change, and says oil is the “lifeblood” of the US economy. In contrast, he says that wind turbines are ugly, inefficient bird-killers that harm human health. You know, the usual.

Trump appears to have thawed to wind a bit this campaign saying that he supports wind subsidies, particularly when oil prices are high, but he was being quizzed at the time by an Iowa voter whose husband works in wind. We won’t take his statement at face value.

So the prospects for wind do not look good under Trump, but here’s the thing: they do not look any better under Cruz or Rubio.

Cruz does not believe in man-made climate change; opposes wind and solar development; and sees no point creating jobs in green energy. He says wind should compete on a level playing field with other forms of energy — which really means wind should compete without any subsidies against heavily-subsidised fossil fuels firms.

And Rubio is no better. He does not believe in man-made climate change and wants more investment in fossil fuels. He has said that he wants the US to lead the world in everything, including wind and solar, but his plan for doing that is to remove renewable energy support and let the market decide. He isn’t going to lead the world in wind with a plan like that, but we don't believe he really wants to.

The other point worth noting here is that Trump is actually far more liberal that his rivals on a lot of issues. He has vowed to protect Medicare and Social Security Entitlements from cuts. As a result, for wind, Trump looks the best of a bad bunch.

But that is not to say that we want to see Trump in charge.

The Democrat candidates Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders are both more pro-renewables than any of the Republicans. Clinton wants the US to be a “clean energy superpower”, and Sanders wants to boost the investment in renewables while also repealing subsidies for the fossil fuels sector.

And, on balance, we do not want Trump as the Republican candidate either. He may be slightly more sympathetic to wind than his Republican rivals, but he is also a charismatic candidate who is more likely to take wavering voters away from the Democrats. And the best prospect for wind is a Democrat in the White House.

But what if he does win the presidency? Well, out of the five candidates still in the running, he looks like the third-best result for wind. If that does not give a sense of what is at stake for wind in this November's election, we don't know what will.

The wind industry should not worry about Trump just yet — but, if he dominates Super Tuesday, it will be fine to start getting jittery.

When is the right time to start worrying about Donald Trump?

This time last year we thought the chance of Trump standing in the race to become the Republican candidate in the US presidential race was slim. He said he was “seriously thinking” about it as he has done before, so we dismissed it as publicity-seeking bravado.

How wrong we were. Not only did the brash billionaire enter the race, but he heads into tomorrow’s Super Tuesday leading it.

Twelve states are due to hold Republican primaries tomorrow and there are 595 delegates at stake. His supporters will hope that he confirms his status as the party’s presidential nominee, while his opponents will hope that Ted Cruz or Marco Rubio continue the fight with supporters from fallen rivals like Jeb Bush.

If we end up with President Trump after 8 November then it could be a disaster for wind. He is arguably the world’s most high-profile NIMBY because of his long legal battle against a 100MW scheme off the coast of Scotland. He lost a legal action against the project in the UK’s Supreme Court in December, and now plans to go to the European Court of Justice.

US wind investors should be worried too. Trump has repeatedly denied the science behind climate change, and says oil is the “lifeblood” of the US economy. In contrast, he says that wind turbines are ugly, inefficient bird-killers that harm human health. You know, the usual.

Trump appears to have thawed to wind a bit this campaign saying that he supports wind subsidies, particularly when oil prices are high, but he was being quizzed at the time by an Iowa voter whose husband works in wind. We won’t take his statement at face value.

So the prospects for wind do not look good under Trump, but here’s the thing: they do not look any better under Cruz or Rubio.

Cruz does not believe in man-made climate change; opposes wind and solar development; and sees no point creating jobs in green energy. He says wind should compete on a level playing field with other forms of energy — which really means wind should compete without any subsidies against heavily-subsidised fossil fuels firms.

And Rubio is no better. He does not believe in man-made climate change and wants more investment in fossil fuels. He has said that he wants the US to lead the world in everything, including wind and solar, but his plan for doing that is to remove renewable energy support and let the market decide. He isn’t going to lead the world in wind with a plan like that, but we don't believe he really wants to.

The other point worth noting here is that Trump is actually far more liberal that his rivals on a lot of issues. He has vowed to protect Medicare and Social Security Entitlements from cuts. As a result, for wind, Trump looks the best of a bad bunch.

But that is not to say that we want to see Trump in charge.

The Democrat candidates Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders are both more pro-renewables than any of the Republicans. Clinton wants the US to be a “clean energy superpower”, and Sanders wants to boost the investment in renewables while also repealing subsidies for the fossil fuels sector.

And, on balance, we do not want Trump as the Republican candidate either. He may be slightly more sympathetic to wind than his Republican rivals, but he is also a charismatic candidate who is more likely to take wavering voters away from the Democrats. And the best prospect for wind is a Democrat in the White House.

But what if he does win the presidency? Well, out of the five candidates still in the running, he looks like the third-best result for wind. If that does not give a sense of what is at stake for wind in this November's election, we don't know what will.

The wind industry should not worry about Trump just yet — but, if he dominates Super Tuesday, it will be fine to start getting jittery.

When is the right time to start worrying about Donald Trump?

This time last year we thought the chance of Trump standing in the race to become the Republican candidate in the US presidential race was slim. He said he was “seriously thinking” about it as he has done before, so we dismissed it as publicity-seeking bravado.

How wrong we were. Not only did the brash billionaire enter the race, but he heads into tomorrow’s Super Tuesday leading it.

Twelve states are due to hold Republican primaries tomorrow and there are 595 delegates at stake. His supporters will hope that he confirms his status as the party’s presidential nominee, while his opponents will hope that Ted Cruz or Marco Rubio continue the fight with supporters from fallen rivals like Jeb Bush.

If we end up with President Trump after 8 November then it could be a disaster for wind. He is arguably the world’s most high-profile NIMBY because of his long legal battle against a 100MW scheme off the coast of Scotland. He lost a legal action against the project in the UK’s Supreme Court in December, and now plans to go to the European Court of Justice.

US wind investors should be worried too. Trump has repeatedly denied the science behind climate change, and says oil is the “lifeblood” of the US economy. In contrast, he says that wind turbines are ugly, inefficient bird-killers that harm human health. You know, the usual.

Trump appears to have thawed to wind a bit this campaign saying that he supports wind subsidies, particularly when oil prices are high, but he was being quizzed at the time by an Iowa voter whose husband works in wind. We won’t take his statement at face value.

So the prospects for wind do not look good under Trump, but here’s the thing: they do not look any better under Cruz or Rubio.

Cruz does not believe in man-made climate change; opposes wind and solar development; and sees no point creating jobs in green energy. He says wind should compete on a level playing field with other forms of energy — which really means wind should compete without any subsidies against heavily-subsidised fossil fuels firms.

And Rubio is no better. He does not believe in man-made climate change and wants more investment in fossil fuels. He has said that he wants the US to lead the world in everything, including wind and solar, but his plan for doing that is to remove renewable energy support and let the market decide. He isn’t going to lead the world in wind with a plan like that, but we don't believe he really wants to.

The other point worth noting here is that Trump is actually far more liberal that his rivals on a lot of issues. He has vowed to protect Medicare and Social Security Entitlements from cuts. As a result, for wind, Trump looks the best of a bad bunch.

But that is not to say that we want to see Trump in charge.

The Democrat candidates Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders are both more pro-renewables than any of the Republicans. Clinton wants the US to be a “clean energy superpower”, and Sanders wants to boost the investment in renewables while also repealing subsidies for the fossil fuels sector.

And, on balance, we do not want Trump as the Republican candidate either. He may be slightly more sympathetic to wind than his Republican rivals, but he is also a charismatic candidate who is more likely to take wavering voters away from the Democrats. And the best prospect for wind is a Democrat in the White House.

But what if he does win the presidency? Well, out of the five candidates still in the running, he looks like the third-best result for wind. If that does not give a sense of what is at stake for wind in this November's election, we don't know what will.

The wind industry should not worry about Trump just yet — but, if he dominates Super Tuesday, it will be fine to start getting jittery.

When is the right time to start worrying about Donald Trump?

This time last year we thought the chance of Trump standing in the race to become the Republican candidate in the US presidential race was slim. He said he was “seriously thinking” about it as he has done before, so we dismissed it as publicity-seeking bravado.

How wrong we were. Not only did the brash billionaire enter the race, but he heads into tomorrow’s Super Tuesday leading it.

Twelve states are due to hold Republican primaries tomorrow and there are 595 delegates at stake. His supporters will hope that he confirms his status as the party’s presidential nominee, while his opponents will hope that Ted Cruz or Marco Rubio continue the fight with supporters from fallen rivals like Jeb Bush.

If we end up with President Trump after 8 November then it could be a disaster for wind. He is arguably the world’s most high-profile NIMBY because of his long legal battle against a 100MW scheme off the coast of Scotland. He lost a legal action against the project in the UK’s Supreme Court in December, and now plans to go to the European Court of Justice.

US wind investors should be worried too. Trump has repeatedly denied the science behind climate change, and says oil is the “lifeblood” of the US economy. In contrast, he says that wind turbines are ugly, inefficient bird-killers that harm human health. You know, the usual.

Trump appears to have thawed to wind a bit this campaign saying that he supports wind subsidies, particularly when oil prices are high, but he was being quizzed at the time by an Iowa voter whose husband works in wind. We won’t take his statement at face value.

So the prospects for wind do not look good under Trump, but here’s the thing: they do not look any better under Cruz or Rubio.

Cruz does not believe in man-made climate change; opposes wind and solar development; and sees no point creating jobs in green energy. He says wind should compete on a level playing field with other forms of energy — which really means wind should compete without any subsidies against heavily-subsidised fossil fuels firms.

And Rubio is no better. He does not believe in man-made climate change and wants more investment in fossil fuels. He has said that he wants the US to lead the world in everything, including wind and solar, but his plan for doing that is to remove renewable energy support and let the market decide. He isn’t going to lead the world in wind with a plan like that, but we don't believe he really wants to.

The other point worth noting here is that Trump is actually far more liberal that his rivals on a lot of issues. He has vowed to protect Medicare and Social Security Entitlements from cuts. As a result, for wind, Trump looks the best of a bad bunch.

But that is not to say that we want to see Trump in charge.

The Democrat candidates Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders are both more pro-renewables than any of the Republicans. Clinton wants the US to be a “clean energy superpower”, and Sanders wants to boost the investment in renewables while also repealing subsidies for the fossil fuels sector.

And, on balance, we do not want Trump as the Republican candidate either. He may be slightly more sympathetic to wind than his Republican rivals, but he is also a charismatic candidate who is more likely to take wavering voters away from the Democrats. And the best prospect for wind is a Democrat in the White House.

But what if he does win the presidency? Well, out of the five candidates still in the running, he looks like the third-best result for wind. If that does not give a sense of what is at stake for wind in this November's election, we don't know what will.

The wind industry should not worry about Trump just yet — but, if he dominates Super Tuesday, it will be fine to start getting jittery.

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Not a member yet?

Become a member of the 6,500-strong A Word About Wind community today, and gain access to our premium content, exclusive lead generation and investment opportunities.