Unlikely friendships

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Adam Barber
March 8, 2013
This content is from our archive. Some formatting or links may be broken.
This content is from our archive. Some formatting or links may be broken.
Unlikely friendships

Bernardo O’Higgins had nothing to do with wind energy.

He did, however, know a thing or too about fighting the Spanish. Something that was to prove critical when it came to securing Chilean independence, all the way back in 1826.

And perhaps most crucially – not least to the viability of this opening link – the man had strong Irish ancestry.

Something that was to become a key part of his modern day legacy and that remains key to the modern-day political and economic Chilean-Irish ties.

Need proof?

Then look no further than the announcement from Mainstream Renewable Power a little over a month ago, following the commercial close of a 33MW wind farm, in southern Chile – the developer’s latest local win.

Here, the $70 million project, that is 100% owned by the business, is already under construction and is due to enter operations in September this year.

What’s more, the need for Power Purchase Agreements has been deftly sidestepped, as the developer seeks to sell the electricity direct into the spot market.

That’s a neat trick. And something that has undoubtedly come about as a result of working closely with Andes Energy, its local developer who can act as Mainstream’s eyes and ears, out there on the ground.

As a result, it’s no surprise that the business now has over 3,300MW of Chilean wind and solar power under development, with many of the early sites already operational.

But here’s the thing. For many western utilities and developers, the thought of chasing down deals far from home, let alone on South American soil, remains quite the risk.

The fragility of local economies can be worrisome, they’ll say. And the need to invest in expensive transport links and early-phase infrastructure too great.

And it’s true. The risks do remain high.

However, as some of the more entrepreneurial sorts begin to push the edge of the envelope and capitalise on old world connections and ties, it’s evident that the relative comfort of domestic markets are quickly coming to a close.

And what’s more, many of the emerging energy economies are already looking for leaders.

There’s no promise that your name plastered all over a bank, or a football team of course. However, on the flipside you might just find that future market growth.

Bernardo O’Higgins had nothing to do with wind energy.

He did, however, know a thing or too about fighting the Spanish. Something that was to prove critical when it came to securing Chilean independence, all the way back in 1826.

And perhaps most crucially – not least to the viability of this opening link – the man had strong Irish ancestry.

Something that was to become a key part of his modern day legacy and that remains key to the modern-day political and economic Chilean-Irish ties.

Need proof?

Then look no further than the announcement from Mainstream Renewable Power a little over a month ago, following the commercial close of a 33MW wind farm, in southern Chile – the developer’s latest local win.

Here, the $70 million project, that is 100% owned by the business, is already under construction and is due to enter operations in September this year.

What’s more, the need for Power Purchase Agreements has been deftly sidestepped, as the developer seeks to sell the electricity direct into the spot market.

That’s a neat trick. And something that has undoubtedly come about as a result of working closely with Andes Energy, its local developer who can act as Mainstream’s eyes and ears, out there on the ground.

As a result, it’s no surprise that the business now has over 3,300MW of Chilean wind and solar power under development, with many of the early sites already operational.

But here’s the thing. For many western utilities and developers, the thought of chasing down deals far from home, let alone on South American soil, remains quite the risk.

The fragility of local economies can be worrisome, they’ll say. And the need to invest in expensive transport links and early-phase infrastructure too great.

And it’s true. The risks do remain high.

However, as some of the more entrepreneurial sorts begin to push the edge of the envelope and capitalise on old world connections and ties, it’s evident that the relative comfort of domestic markets are quickly coming to a close.

And what’s more, many of the emerging energy economies are already looking for leaders.

There’s no promise that your name plastered all over a bank, or a football team of course. However, on the flipside you might just find that future market growth.

Bernardo O’Higgins had nothing to do with wind energy.

He did, however, know a thing or too about fighting the Spanish. Something that was to prove critical when it came to securing Chilean independence, all the way back in 1826.

And perhaps most crucially – not least to the viability of this opening link – the man had strong Irish ancestry.

Something that was to become a key part of his modern day legacy and that remains key to the modern-day political and economic Chilean-Irish ties.

Need proof?

Then look no further than the announcement from Mainstream Renewable Power a little over a month ago, following the commercial close of a 33MW wind farm, in southern Chile – the developer’s latest local win.

Here, the $70 million project, that is 100% owned by the business, is already under construction and is due to enter operations in September this year.

What’s more, the need for Power Purchase Agreements has been deftly sidestepped, as the developer seeks to sell the electricity direct into the spot market.

That’s a neat trick. And something that has undoubtedly come about as a result of working closely with Andes Energy, its local developer who can act as Mainstream’s eyes and ears, out there on the ground.

As a result, it’s no surprise that the business now has over 3,300MW of Chilean wind and solar power under development, with many of the early sites already operational.

But here’s the thing. For many western utilities and developers, the thought of chasing down deals far from home, let alone on South American soil, remains quite the risk.

The fragility of local economies can be worrisome, they’ll say. And the need to invest in expensive transport links and early-phase infrastructure too great.

And it’s true. The risks do remain high.

However, as some of the more entrepreneurial sorts begin to push the edge of the envelope and capitalise on old world connections and ties, it’s evident that the relative comfort of domestic markets are quickly coming to a close.

And what’s more, many of the emerging energy economies are already looking for leaders.

There’s no promise that your name plastered all over a bank, or a football team of course. However, on the flipside you might just find that future market growth.

Bernardo O’Higgins had nothing to do with wind energy.

He did, however, know a thing or too about fighting the Spanish. Something that was to prove critical when it came to securing Chilean independence, all the way back in 1826.

And perhaps most crucially – not least to the viability of this opening link – the man had strong Irish ancestry.

Something that was to become a key part of his modern day legacy and that remains key to the modern-day political and economic Chilean-Irish ties.

Need proof?

Then look no further than the announcement from Mainstream Renewable Power a little over a month ago, following the commercial close of a 33MW wind farm, in southern Chile – the developer’s latest local win.

Here, the $70 million project, that is 100% owned by the business, is already under construction and is due to enter operations in September this year.

What’s more, the need for Power Purchase Agreements has been deftly sidestepped, as the developer seeks to sell the electricity direct into the spot market.

That’s a neat trick. And something that has undoubtedly come about as a result of working closely with Andes Energy, its local developer who can act as Mainstream’s eyes and ears, out there on the ground.

As a result, it’s no surprise that the business now has over 3,300MW of Chilean wind and solar power under development, with many of the early sites already operational.

But here’s the thing. For many western utilities and developers, the thought of chasing down deals far from home, let alone on South American soil, remains quite the risk.

The fragility of local economies can be worrisome, they’ll say. And the need to invest in expensive transport links and early-phase infrastructure too great.

And it’s true. The risks do remain high.

However, as some of the more entrepreneurial sorts begin to push the edge of the envelope and capitalise on old world connections and ties, it’s evident that the relative comfort of domestic markets are quickly coming to a close.

And what’s more, many of the emerging energy economies are already looking for leaders.

There’s no promise that your name plastered all over a bank, or a football team of course. However, on the flipside you might just find that future market growth.

Bernardo O’Higgins had nothing to do with wind energy.

He did, however, know a thing or too about fighting the Spanish. Something that was to prove critical when it came to securing Chilean independence, all the way back in 1826.

And perhaps most crucially – not least to the viability of this opening link – the man had strong Irish ancestry.

Something that was to become a key part of his modern day legacy and that remains key to the modern-day political and economic Chilean-Irish ties.

Need proof?

Then look no further than the announcement from Mainstream Renewable Power a little over a month ago, following the commercial close of a 33MW wind farm, in southern Chile – the developer’s latest local win.

Here, the $70 million project, that is 100% owned by the business, is already under construction and is due to enter operations in September this year.

What’s more, the need for Power Purchase Agreements has been deftly sidestepped, as the developer seeks to sell the electricity direct into the spot market.

That’s a neat trick. And something that has undoubtedly come about as a result of working closely with Andes Energy, its local developer who can act as Mainstream’s eyes and ears, out there on the ground.

As a result, it’s no surprise that the business now has over 3,300MW of Chilean wind and solar power under development, with many of the early sites already operational.

But here’s the thing. For many western utilities and developers, the thought of chasing down deals far from home, let alone on South American soil, remains quite the risk.

The fragility of local economies can be worrisome, they’ll say. And the need to invest in expensive transport links and early-phase infrastructure too great.

And it’s true. The risks do remain high.

However, as some of the more entrepreneurial sorts begin to push the edge of the envelope and capitalise on old world connections and ties, it’s evident that the relative comfort of domestic markets are quickly coming to a close.

And what’s more, many of the emerging energy economies are already looking for leaders.

There’s no promise that your name plastered all over a bank, or a football team of course. However, on the flipside you might just find that future market growth.

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Not a member yet?

Become a member of the 6,500-strong A Word About Wind community today, and gain access to our premium content, exclusive lead generation and investment opportunities.