Top 100 Power People 2014: Open for nominations

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Adam Barber
September 15, 2014
This content is from our archive. Some formatting or links may be broken.
This content is from our archive. Some formatting or links may be broken.
Top 100 Power People 2014: Open for nominations

Think you've got a busy week ahead? Spare a thought for the Scots. For when voters go to the polls on Thursday, they've got quite a decision to make.

Both the "Yes" and the "No" campaign have been fighting tooth and claw for voters attention for months now and leaders on both sides have been constantly looking for the upper hand.

Each side has been at pains to present their strategy as the answer to future success, prosperity and growth. They've been selling an idea and they're looking to garner widespread public support.

To do so, they've been seeking the confidence and trust of the public and they've been at pains to present a credible strategy for the future. Scottish economic growth may have been strong in recent years but in the future, it's still not a given. And questions remain.

And here's the thing. The answers to those questions are equally as important as the individual delivering the message. In others words, in politics as in business, this is when leadership really matters.

Now contrast the Scottish referendum with wind.

Global capacity is more than six times what it was a decade ago. Markets are opening up in Africa, eastern Europe, the Middle East and South America. And we're seeing investors gain confidence in wind farms as an asset class in it's own right. This is all pretty promising stuff.

And yet wind still accounts for just a small proportion of the energy used around the world; and in many countries is still beholden to friendly subsidies and the whims of politicians. In this respect, Australia, Germany, Spain and the US all show to varying degrees just how quickly things can change.

However, wind energy's growth cannot be measured in pure MW's alone. Rather, perhaps a more accurate measure can perhaps be better gained through taking a closer look at the people working within it.

For - just like in Scotland - it's individuals that steer people through the good and the bad, and it's these individuals that will continue to identify new opportunities to develop — providing the catalysts to act.

In short, it's why leadership really matters - irrespective of whether you're an aspirational nation or a growing part of the energy mix.

So it's because of all this talk of leadership that today, we'll once again begin the research for our annual Top 100 Power People, which we will publish in November. The report is a definitive wind industry who's who.

The concept is simple but it's a herculean task. Assembling an independent panel of experts, reinforced by our own market analysis we'll be ranking nominees based on their industry experience and track record; contacts; leadership; and their financial firepower.

So it's with this in mind, we're asking for your support. Between now and the end of September, we'll be first finalising the long list - working through all possible candidates and arguing the toss on why they ought to merit a listing. And to ensure that we're taking everyone into consideration, we want your view.

If you have nominations for us to consider - please, drop the team a quick note, jotting down your views. We can't promise a response to everyone but we guarantee to read every email nomination you send.

Think you've got a busy week ahead? Spare a thought for the Scots. For when voters go to the polls on Thursday, they've got quite a decision to make.

Both the "Yes" and the "No" campaign have been fighting tooth and claw for voters attention for months now and leaders on both sides have been constantly looking for the upper hand.

Each side has been at pains to present their strategy as the answer to future success, prosperity and growth. They've been selling an idea and they're looking to garner widespread public support.

To do so, they've been seeking the confidence and trust of the public and they've been at pains to present a credible strategy for the future. Scottish economic growth may have been strong in recent years but in the future, it's still not a given. And questions remain.

And here's the thing. The answers to those questions are equally as important as the individual delivering the message. In others words, in politics as in business, this is when leadership really matters.

Now contrast the Scottish referendum with wind.

Global capacity is more than six times what it was a decade ago. Markets are opening up in Africa, eastern Europe, the Middle East and South America. And we're seeing investors gain confidence in wind farms as an asset class in it's own right. This is all pretty promising stuff.

And yet wind still accounts for just a small proportion of the energy used around the world; and in many countries is still beholden to friendly subsidies and the whims of politicians. In this respect, Australia, Germany, Spain and the US all show to varying degrees just how quickly things can change.

However, wind energy's growth cannot be measured in pure MW's alone. Rather, perhaps a more accurate measure can perhaps be better gained through taking a closer look at the people working within it.

For - just like in Scotland - it's individuals that steer people through the good and the bad, and it's these individuals that will continue to identify new opportunities to develop — providing the catalysts to act.

In short, it's why leadership really matters - irrespective of whether you're an aspirational nation or a growing part of the energy mix.

So it's because of all this talk of leadership that today, we'll once again begin the research for our annual Top 100 Power People, which we will publish in November. The report is a definitive wind industry who's who.

The concept is simple but it's a herculean task. Assembling an independent panel of experts, reinforced by our own market analysis we'll be ranking nominees based on their industry experience and track record; contacts; leadership; and their financial firepower.

So it's with this in mind, we're asking for your support. Between now and the end of September, we'll be first finalising the long list - working through all possible candidates and arguing the toss on why they ought to merit a listing. And to ensure that we're taking everyone into consideration, we want your view.

If you have nominations for us to consider - please, drop the team a quick note, jotting down your views. We can't promise a response to everyone but we guarantee to read every email nomination you send.

Think you've got a busy week ahead? Spare a thought for the Scots. For when voters go to the polls on Thursday, they've got quite a decision to make.

Both the "Yes" and the "No" campaign have been fighting tooth and claw for voters attention for months now and leaders on both sides have been constantly looking for the upper hand.

Each side has been at pains to present their strategy as the answer to future success, prosperity and growth. They've been selling an idea and they're looking to garner widespread public support.

To do so, they've been seeking the confidence and trust of the public and they've been at pains to present a credible strategy for the future. Scottish economic growth may have been strong in recent years but in the future, it's still not a given. And questions remain.

And here's the thing. The answers to those questions are equally as important as the individual delivering the message. In others words, in politics as in business, this is when leadership really matters.

Now contrast the Scottish referendum with wind.

Global capacity is more than six times what it was a decade ago. Markets are opening up in Africa, eastern Europe, the Middle East and South America. And we're seeing investors gain confidence in wind farms as an asset class in it's own right. This is all pretty promising stuff.

And yet wind still accounts for just a small proportion of the energy used around the world; and in many countries is still beholden to friendly subsidies and the whims of politicians. In this respect, Australia, Germany, Spain and the US all show to varying degrees just how quickly things can change.

However, wind energy's growth cannot be measured in pure MW's alone. Rather, perhaps a more accurate measure can perhaps be better gained through taking a closer look at the people working within it.

For - just like in Scotland - it's individuals that steer people through the good and the bad, and it's these individuals that will continue to identify new opportunities to develop — providing the catalysts to act.

In short, it's why leadership really matters - irrespective of whether you're an aspirational nation or a growing part of the energy mix.

So it's because of all this talk of leadership that today, we'll once again begin the research for our annual Top 100 Power People, which we will publish in November. The report is a definitive wind industry who's who.

The concept is simple but it's a herculean task. Assembling an independent panel of experts, reinforced by our own market analysis we'll be ranking nominees based on their industry experience and track record; contacts; leadership; and their financial firepower.

So it's with this in mind, we're asking for your support. Between now and the end of September, we'll be first finalising the long list - working through all possible candidates and arguing the toss on why they ought to merit a listing. And to ensure that we're taking everyone into consideration, we want your view.

If you have nominations for us to consider - please, drop the team a quick note, jotting down your views. We can't promise a response to everyone but we guarantee to read every email nomination you send.

Think you've got a busy week ahead? Spare a thought for the Scots. For when voters go to the polls on Thursday, they've got quite a decision to make.

Both the "Yes" and the "No" campaign have been fighting tooth and claw for voters attention for months now and leaders on both sides have been constantly looking for the upper hand.

Each side has been at pains to present their strategy as the answer to future success, prosperity and growth. They've been selling an idea and they're looking to garner widespread public support.

To do so, they've been seeking the confidence and trust of the public and they've been at pains to present a credible strategy for the future. Scottish economic growth may have been strong in recent years but in the future, it's still not a given. And questions remain.

And here's the thing. The answers to those questions are equally as important as the individual delivering the message. In others words, in politics as in business, this is when leadership really matters.

Now contrast the Scottish referendum with wind.

Global capacity is more than six times what it was a decade ago. Markets are opening up in Africa, eastern Europe, the Middle East and South America. And we're seeing investors gain confidence in wind farms as an asset class in it's own right. This is all pretty promising stuff.

And yet wind still accounts for just a small proportion of the energy used around the world; and in many countries is still beholden to friendly subsidies and the whims of politicians. In this respect, Australia, Germany, Spain and the US all show to varying degrees just how quickly things can change.

However, wind energy's growth cannot be measured in pure MW's alone. Rather, perhaps a more accurate measure can perhaps be better gained through taking a closer look at the people working within it.

For - just like in Scotland - it's individuals that steer people through the good and the bad, and it's these individuals that will continue to identify new opportunities to develop — providing the catalysts to act.

In short, it's why leadership really matters - irrespective of whether you're an aspirational nation or a growing part of the energy mix.

So it's because of all this talk of leadership that today, we'll once again begin the research for our annual Top 100 Power People, which we will publish in November. The report is a definitive wind industry who's who.

The concept is simple but it's a herculean task. Assembling an independent panel of experts, reinforced by our own market analysis we'll be ranking nominees based on their industry experience and track record; contacts; leadership; and their financial firepower.

So it's with this in mind, we're asking for your support. Between now and the end of September, we'll be first finalising the long list - working through all possible candidates and arguing the toss on why they ought to merit a listing. And to ensure that we're taking everyone into consideration, we want your view.

If you have nominations for us to consider - please, drop the team a quick note, jotting down your views. We can't promise a response to everyone but we guarantee to read every email nomination you send.

Think you've got a busy week ahead? Spare a thought for the Scots. For when voters go to the polls on Thursday, they've got quite a decision to make.

Both the "Yes" and the "No" campaign have been fighting tooth and claw for voters attention for months now and leaders on both sides have been constantly looking for the upper hand.

Each side has been at pains to present their strategy as the answer to future success, prosperity and growth. They've been selling an idea and they're looking to garner widespread public support.

To do so, they've been seeking the confidence and trust of the public and they've been at pains to present a credible strategy for the future. Scottish economic growth may have been strong in recent years but in the future, it's still not a given. And questions remain.

And here's the thing. The answers to those questions are equally as important as the individual delivering the message. In others words, in politics as in business, this is when leadership really matters.

Now contrast the Scottish referendum with wind.

Global capacity is more than six times what it was a decade ago. Markets are opening up in Africa, eastern Europe, the Middle East and South America. And we're seeing investors gain confidence in wind farms as an asset class in it's own right. This is all pretty promising stuff.

And yet wind still accounts for just a small proportion of the energy used around the world; and in many countries is still beholden to friendly subsidies and the whims of politicians. In this respect, Australia, Germany, Spain and the US all show to varying degrees just how quickly things can change.

However, wind energy's growth cannot be measured in pure MW's alone. Rather, perhaps a more accurate measure can perhaps be better gained through taking a closer look at the people working within it.

For - just like in Scotland - it's individuals that steer people through the good and the bad, and it's these individuals that will continue to identify new opportunities to develop — providing the catalysts to act.

In short, it's why leadership really matters - irrespective of whether you're an aspirational nation or a growing part of the energy mix.

So it's because of all this talk of leadership that today, we'll once again begin the research for our annual Top 100 Power People, which we will publish in November. The report is a definitive wind industry who's who.

The concept is simple but it's a herculean task. Assembling an independent panel of experts, reinforced by our own market analysis we'll be ranking nominees based on their industry experience and track record; contacts; leadership; and their financial firepower.

So it's with this in mind, we're asking for your support. Between now and the end of September, we'll be first finalising the long list - working through all possible candidates and arguing the toss on why they ought to merit a listing. And to ensure that we're taking everyone into consideration, we want your view.

If you have nominations for us to consider - please, drop the team a quick note, jotting down your views. We can't promise a response to everyone but we guarantee to read every email nomination you send.

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Full archive access is available to members only

Not a member yet?

Become a member of the 6,500-strong A Word About Wind community today, and gain access to our premium content, exclusive lead generation and investment opportunities.