The Silent Majority

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Adam Barber
July 15, 2011
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The Silent Majority

Whilst writing last week that perhaps the likely second instance of a wind farm closure was an aberration, figures obtained this week by law firm, McGrigors, leave little doubt about the growing momentum behind the campaign to slow the development of onshore wind.

Starkly, the figures show that last year saw the lowest number of accepted wind farm proposals since 2005, with only 32 of 66 schemes accepted.

Significantly, under the forthcoming localism bill, with planning powers increasingly devolved back to provincial town halls, there is a strong likelihood of well orchestrated local campaigns continuing to successfully challenge planning applications. As an aside its interesting to note that many local councils refuse to act in disputes regarding reduced daylight, but are seemingly happy to cancel applications on the grounds of 'visual impact'.

And whilst the campaigners will be able to enjoy victory on a micro level, this does rather debase the national, and indeed European interest in meeting stringent climate change targets by 2020. It also fails to answer a number of questions regarding the important issue of energy security, as oil supplying countries look increasingly politically unstable. It also removes the possibility of local economic benefits through the use of the local supply chain.

The answer, then, must lie in winning hearts and minds. Often the naysayers are lead by a vocal minority and tend to silence those who believe in a green, sustainable and secure energy future. The key is encouraging the silent majority to get involved.

Whilst writing last week that perhaps the likely second instance of a wind farm closure was an aberration, figures obtained this week by law firm, McGrigors, leave little doubt about the growing momentum behind the campaign to slow the development of onshore wind.

Starkly, the figures show that last year saw the lowest number of accepted wind farm proposals since 2005, with only 32 of 66 schemes accepted.

Significantly, under the forthcoming localism bill, with planning powers increasingly devolved back to provincial town halls, there is a strong likelihood of well orchestrated local campaigns continuing to successfully challenge planning applications. As an aside its interesting to note that many local councils refuse to act in disputes regarding reduced daylight, but are seemingly happy to cancel applications on the grounds of 'visual impact'.

And whilst the campaigners will be able to enjoy victory on a micro level, this does rather debase the national, and indeed European interest in meeting stringent climate change targets by 2020. It also fails to answer a number of questions regarding the important issue of energy security, as oil supplying countries look increasingly politically unstable. It also removes the possibility of local economic benefits through the use of the local supply chain.

The answer, then, must lie in winning hearts and minds. Often the naysayers are lead by a vocal minority and tend to silence those who believe in a green, sustainable and secure energy future. The key is encouraging the silent majority to get involved.

Whilst writing last week that perhaps the likely second instance of a wind farm closure was an aberration, figures obtained this week by law firm, McGrigors, leave little doubt about the growing momentum behind the campaign to slow the development of onshore wind.

Starkly, the figures show that last year saw the lowest number of accepted wind farm proposals since 2005, with only 32 of 66 schemes accepted.

Significantly, under the forthcoming localism bill, with planning powers increasingly devolved back to provincial town halls, there is a strong likelihood of well orchestrated local campaigns continuing to successfully challenge planning applications. As an aside its interesting to note that many local councils refuse to act in disputes regarding reduced daylight, but are seemingly happy to cancel applications on the grounds of 'visual impact'.

And whilst the campaigners will be able to enjoy victory on a micro level, this does rather debase the national, and indeed European interest in meeting stringent climate change targets by 2020. It also fails to answer a number of questions regarding the important issue of energy security, as oil supplying countries look increasingly politically unstable. It also removes the possibility of local economic benefits through the use of the local supply chain.

The answer, then, must lie in winning hearts and minds. Often the naysayers are lead by a vocal minority and tend to silence those who believe in a green, sustainable and secure energy future. The key is encouraging the silent majority to get involved.

Whilst writing last week that perhaps the likely second instance of a wind farm closure was an aberration, figures obtained this week by law firm, McGrigors, leave little doubt about the growing momentum behind the campaign to slow the development of onshore wind.

Starkly, the figures show that last year saw the lowest number of accepted wind farm proposals since 2005, with only 32 of 66 schemes accepted.

Significantly, under the forthcoming localism bill, with planning powers increasingly devolved back to provincial town halls, there is a strong likelihood of well orchestrated local campaigns continuing to successfully challenge planning applications. As an aside its interesting to note that many local councils refuse to act in disputes regarding reduced daylight, but are seemingly happy to cancel applications on the grounds of 'visual impact'.

And whilst the campaigners will be able to enjoy victory on a micro level, this does rather debase the national, and indeed European interest in meeting stringent climate change targets by 2020. It also fails to answer a number of questions regarding the important issue of energy security, as oil supplying countries look increasingly politically unstable. It also removes the possibility of local economic benefits through the use of the local supply chain.

The answer, then, must lie in winning hearts and minds. Often the naysayers are lead by a vocal minority and tend to silence those who believe in a green, sustainable and secure energy future. The key is encouraging the silent majority to get involved.

Whilst writing last week that perhaps the likely second instance of a wind farm closure was an aberration, figures obtained this week by law firm, McGrigors, leave little doubt about the growing momentum behind the campaign to slow the development of onshore wind.

Starkly, the figures show that last year saw the lowest number of accepted wind farm proposals since 2005, with only 32 of 66 schemes accepted.

Significantly, under the forthcoming localism bill, with planning powers increasingly devolved back to provincial town halls, there is a strong likelihood of well orchestrated local campaigns continuing to successfully challenge planning applications. As an aside its interesting to note that many local councils refuse to act in disputes regarding reduced daylight, but are seemingly happy to cancel applications on the grounds of 'visual impact'.

And whilst the campaigners will be able to enjoy victory on a micro level, this does rather debase the national, and indeed European interest in meeting stringent climate change targets by 2020. It also fails to answer a number of questions regarding the important issue of energy security, as oil supplying countries look increasingly politically unstable. It also removes the possibility of local economic benefits through the use of the local supply chain.

The answer, then, must lie in winning hearts and minds. Often the naysayers are lead by a vocal minority and tend to silence those who believe in a green, sustainable and secure energy future. The key is encouraging the silent majority to get involved.

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Not a member yet?

Become a member of the 6,500-strong A Word About Wind community today, and gain access to our premium content, exclusive lead generation and investment opportunities.