The second hand market

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Adam Barber
January 24, 2011
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This content is from our archive. Some formatting or links may be broken.
The second hand market

What do you do with an ageing western European wind farm? Ship it east of course.

Although it’s an issue that has yet to truly be explored within the mainstream European media, the last six months has seen a growing trend for project developers to start upgrading wind farm sites with the latest technology and equipment. And with generous incentive packages on offer from the manufacturers, it’s not difficult to see why.

Naturally, as the upgrade begins to get underway, it’s not long before the question of what to do with the old stock comes up. And the straightforward solution is to resell it.

Within Europe, the obvious buyers are located in the east – as the likes of Poland and Latvia come online and begin to invest in the renewables market. In fact, this is exactly where the old Goonhilly turbines are headed and it’s where others will follow suit.

In practice, it’s a simple transaction that stands to benefits both parties. However, as the turbines come back online to enter the second phase of their operational life, questions are starting to be raised about the long term operations costs and risks associated with the initiative. And while the secondary market should be wholeheartedly encouraged, are there any drawbacks that are getting overlooked?

What do you do with an ageing western European wind farm? Ship it east of course.

Although it’s an issue that has yet to truly be explored within the mainstream European media, the last six months has seen a growing trend for project developers to start upgrading wind farm sites with the latest technology and equipment. And with generous incentive packages on offer from the manufacturers, it’s not difficult to see why.

Naturally, as the upgrade begins to get underway, it’s not long before the question of what to do with the old stock comes up. And the straightforward solution is to resell it.

Within Europe, the obvious buyers are located in the east – as the likes of Poland and Latvia come online and begin to invest in the renewables market. In fact, this is exactly where the old Goonhilly turbines are headed and it’s where others will follow suit.

In practice, it’s a simple transaction that stands to benefits both parties. However, as the turbines come back online to enter the second phase of their operational life, questions are starting to be raised about the long term operations costs and risks associated with the initiative. And while the secondary market should be wholeheartedly encouraged, are there any drawbacks that are getting overlooked?

What do you do with an ageing western European wind farm? Ship it east of course.

Although it’s an issue that has yet to truly be explored within the mainstream European media, the last six months has seen a growing trend for project developers to start upgrading wind farm sites with the latest technology and equipment. And with generous incentive packages on offer from the manufacturers, it’s not difficult to see why.

Naturally, as the upgrade begins to get underway, it’s not long before the question of what to do with the old stock comes up. And the straightforward solution is to resell it.

Within Europe, the obvious buyers are located in the east – as the likes of Poland and Latvia come online and begin to invest in the renewables market. In fact, this is exactly where the old Goonhilly turbines are headed and it’s where others will follow suit.

In practice, it’s a simple transaction that stands to benefits both parties. However, as the turbines come back online to enter the second phase of their operational life, questions are starting to be raised about the long term operations costs and risks associated with the initiative. And while the secondary market should be wholeheartedly encouraged, are there any drawbacks that are getting overlooked?

What do you do with an ageing western European wind farm? Ship it east of course.

Although it’s an issue that has yet to truly be explored within the mainstream European media, the last six months has seen a growing trend for project developers to start upgrading wind farm sites with the latest technology and equipment. And with generous incentive packages on offer from the manufacturers, it’s not difficult to see why.

Naturally, as the upgrade begins to get underway, it’s not long before the question of what to do with the old stock comes up. And the straightforward solution is to resell it.

Within Europe, the obvious buyers are located in the east – as the likes of Poland and Latvia come online and begin to invest in the renewables market. In fact, this is exactly where the old Goonhilly turbines are headed and it’s where others will follow suit.

In practice, it’s a simple transaction that stands to benefits both parties. However, as the turbines come back online to enter the second phase of their operational life, questions are starting to be raised about the long term operations costs and risks associated with the initiative. And while the secondary market should be wholeheartedly encouraged, are there any drawbacks that are getting overlooked?

What do you do with an ageing western European wind farm? Ship it east of course.

Although it’s an issue that has yet to truly be explored within the mainstream European media, the last six months has seen a growing trend for project developers to start upgrading wind farm sites with the latest technology and equipment. And with generous incentive packages on offer from the manufacturers, it’s not difficult to see why.

Naturally, as the upgrade begins to get underway, it’s not long before the question of what to do with the old stock comes up. And the straightforward solution is to resell it.

Within Europe, the obvious buyers are located in the east – as the likes of Poland and Latvia come online and begin to invest in the renewables market. In fact, this is exactly where the old Goonhilly turbines are headed and it’s where others will follow suit.

In practice, it’s a simple transaction that stands to benefits both parties. However, as the turbines come back online to enter the second phase of their operational life, questions are starting to be raised about the long term operations costs and risks associated with the initiative. And while the secondary market should be wholeheartedly encouraged, are there any drawbacks that are getting overlooked?

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Not a member yet?

Become a member of the 6,500-strong A Word About Wind community today, and gain access to our premium content, exclusive lead generation and investment opportunities.