The race to 2020

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Adam Barber
April 22, 2011
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The race to 2020

During a time when there is a great deal at stake, the ability to create a sense of certainty within the European wind energy market is critical. Perhaps then, policy makers should pay close attention to this week’s developments in California, where a state law has just been passed requiring that a third of its energy comes from renewable sources by 2020.

While the law is the most progressive of its kind within North America, its similarities to that of the existing European 2020 deadline are noteworthy. However, where it differs is in its rationale for coming into effect.

Californian policy makers have made no excuses about the fact that this is less about becoming green and more about diversifying its energy portfolio and fuelling future industry innovation. While the green ambition remains, it’s clear from the outset that it is by no means the primary policy driver – a substantially different approach to that of Europe.

Whatever the case, with both California and Europe racing towards a 2020 deadline, perhaps we’re about to see some healthy competition on our hands?

During a time when there is a great deal at stake, the ability to create a sense of certainty within the European wind energy market is critical. Perhaps then, policy makers should pay close attention to this week’s developments in California, where a state law has just been passed requiring that a third of its energy comes from renewable sources by 2020.

While the law is the most progressive of its kind within North America, its similarities to that of the existing European 2020 deadline are noteworthy. However, where it differs is in its rationale for coming into effect.

Californian policy makers have made no excuses about the fact that this is less about becoming green and more about diversifying its energy portfolio and fuelling future industry innovation. While the green ambition remains, it’s clear from the outset that it is by no means the primary policy driver – a substantially different approach to that of Europe.

Whatever the case, with both California and Europe racing towards a 2020 deadline, perhaps we’re about to see some healthy competition on our hands?

During a time when there is a great deal at stake, the ability to create a sense of certainty within the European wind energy market is critical. Perhaps then, policy makers should pay close attention to this week’s developments in California, where a state law has just been passed requiring that a third of its energy comes from renewable sources by 2020.

While the law is the most progressive of its kind within North America, its similarities to that of the existing European 2020 deadline are noteworthy. However, where it differs is in its rationale for coming into effect.

Californian policy makers have made no excuses about the fact that this is less about becoming green and more about diversifying its energy portfolio and fuelling future industry innovation. While the green ambition remains, it’s clear from the outset that it is by no means the primary policy driver – a substantially different approach to that of Europe.

Whatever the case, with both California and Europe racing towards a 2020 deadline, perhaps we’re about to see some healthy competition on our hands?

During a time when there is a great deal at stake, the ability to create a sense of certainty within the European wind energy market is critical. Perhaps then, policy makers should pay close attention to this week’s developments in California, where a state law has just been passed requiring that a third of its energy comes from renewable sources by 2020.

While the law is the most progressive of its kind within North America, its similarities to that of the existing European 2020 deadline are noteworthy. However, where it differs is in its rationale for coming into effect.

Californian policy makers have made no excuses about the fact that this is less about becoming green and more about diversifying its energy portfolio and fuelling future industry innovation. While the green ambition remains, it’s clear from the outset that it is by no means the primary policy driver – a substantially different approach to that of Europe.

Whatever the case, with both California and Europe racing towards a 2020 deadline, perhaps we’re about to see some healthy competition on our hands?

During a time when there is a great deal at stake, the ability to create a sense of certainty within the European wind energy market is critical. Perhaps then, policy makers should pay close attention to this week’s developments in California, where a state law has just been passed requiring that a third of its energy comes from renewable sources by 2020.

While the law is the most progressive of its kind within North America, its similarities to that of the existing European 2020 deadline are noteworthy. However, where it differs is in its rationale for coming into effect.

Californian policy makers have made no excuses about the fact that this is less about becoming green and more about diversifying its energy portfolio and fuelling future industry innovation. While the green ambition remains, it’s clear from the outset that it is by no means the primary policy driver – a substantially different approach to that of Europe.

Whatever the case, with both California and Europe racing towards a 2020 deadline, perhaps we’re about to see some healthy competition on our hands?

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