The Power of Surprise

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Adam Barber
February 1, 2013
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This content is from our archive. Some formatting or links may be broken.
The Power of Surprise

Never underestimate the power of surprise.

That’s certainly a trick that the management team at Arise Windpower have achieved over recent months, as its business continues to boom.

Having continued to steadily sign a series of deals, that have enabled them to quickly expand outside of their core domestic market, it’s evident that confidence and momentum grows.

And it’s with good reason.

In the space of just five years, the Swedish company’s local market investments have helped the firm to consolidate national wind power efforts and in return, build up a healthy portfolio of farms totalling 342MW.

Given this growth, it’s perfectly understandable therefore, to see the listed Scandinavian business begin to look to new markets overseas. It keeps the shareholders happy and it builds on lessons learnt closer to home.

The two January deals are a testament to this – with the firm buying a proposed 130MW Nordic, permit-pending project, together with exclusivity rights to develop and build with Argyll Estates within 24 months on the Scottish coast.

Coming just before the conference doors open for EWEA 2013, the deals speak volumes for where this aspiring Swedish developer places trust when working overseas.

And while eyes may roll for advocates within Eastern Europe who feel that they’ve lost out to such investment, for emerging states it’s not all bad news.

Rather, it’s an ever-present reminder of what developers are looking for when it comes to selecting a site on which to develop, build and invest.

As we discussed on Friday, Scotland has made big bets backing clean energy technology, something that’s helped in part by an eloquent political leader.

Similarly, Norway has recognised the benefits of working together with its neighbours to create s stable platform for investment and its ties with Sweden are now strong.

Combined, these partnerships, the firmly established political platform and the simple geography, make overseas investment less surprising than you’d think.

A salutary tale from an ambitious and aspiring developer, then. Particularly as an expected 10,000 delegates head to Vienna with thought of capitalising on new regions, territories and potential new revenue streams never far from their mind.

Never underestimate the power of surprise.

That’s certainly a trick that the management team at Arise Windpower have achieved over recent months, as its business continues to boom.

Having continued to steadily sign a series of deals, that have enabled them to quickly expand outside of their core domestic market, it’s evident that confidence and momentum grows.

And it’s with good reason.

In the space of just five years, the Swedish company’s local market investments have helped the firm to consolidate national wind power efforts and in return, build up a healthy portfolio of farms totalling 342MW.

Given this growth, it’s perfectly understandable therefore, to see the listed Scandinavian business begin to look to new markets overseas. It keeps the shareholders happy and it builds on lessons learnt closer to home.

The two January deals are a testament to this – with the firm buying a proposed 130MW Nordic, permit-pending project, together with exclusivity rights to develop and build with Argyll Estates within 24 months on the Scottish coast.

Coming just before the conference doors open for EWEA 2013, the deals speak volumes for where this aspiring Swedish developer places trust when working overseas.

And while eyes may roll for advocates within Eastern Europe who feel that they’ve lost out to such investment, for emerging states it’s not all bad news.

Rather, it’s an ever-present reminder of what developers are looking for when it comes to selecting a site on which to develop, build and invest.

As we discussed on Friday, Scotland has made big bets backing clean energy technology, something that’s helped in part by an eloquent political leader.

Similarly, Norway has recognised the benefits of working together with its neighbours to create s stable platform for investment and its ties with Sweden are now strong.

Combined, these partnerships, the firmly established political platform and the simple geography, make overseas investment less surprising than you’d think.

A salutary tale from an ambitious and aspiring developer, then. Particularly as an expected 10,000 delegates head to Vienna with thought of capitalising on new regions, territories and potential new revenue streams never far from their mind.

Never underestimate the power of surprise.

That’s certainly a trick that the management team at Arise Windpower have achieved over recent months, as its business continues to boom.

Having continued to steadily sign a series of deals, that have enabled them to quickly expand outside of their core domestic market, it’s evident that confidence and momentum grows.

And it’s with good reason.

In the space of just five years, the Swedish company’s local market investments have helped the firm to consolidate national wind power efforts and in return, build up a healthy portfolio of farms totalling 342MW.

Given this growth, it’s perfectly understandable therefore, to see the listed Scandinavian business begin to look to new markets overseas. It keeps the shareholders happy and it builds on lessons learnt closer to home.

The two January deals are a testament to this – with the firm buying a proposed 130MW Nordic, permit-pending project, together with exclusivity rights to develop and build with Argyll Estates within 24 months on the Scottish coast.

Coming just before the conference doors open for EWEA 2013, the deals speak volumes for where this aspiring Swedish developer places trust when working overseas.

And while eyes may roll for advocates within Eastern Europe who feel that they’ve lost out to such investment, for emerging states it’s not all bad news.

Rather, it’s an ever-present reminder of what developers are looking for when it comes to selecting a site on which to develop, build and invest.

As we discussed on Friday, Scotland has made big bets backing clean energy technology, something that’s helped in part by an eloquent political leader.

Similarly, Norway has recognised the benefits of working together with its neighbours to create s stable platform for investment and its ties with Sweden are now strong.

Combined, these partnerships, the firmly established political platform and the simple geography, make overseas investment less surprising than you’d think.

A salutary tale from an ambitious and aspiring developer, then. Particularly as an expected 10,000 delegates head to Vienna with thought of capitalising on new regions, territories and potential new revenue streams never far from their mind.

Never underestimate the power of surprise.

That’s certainly a trick that the management team at Arise Windpower have achieved over recent months, as its business continues to boom.

Having continued to steadily sign a series of deals, that have enabled them to quickly expand outside of their core domestic market, it’s evident that confidence and momentum grows.

And it’s with good reason.

In the space of just five years, the Swedish company’s local market investments have helped the firm to consolidate national wind power efforts and in return, build up a healthy portfolio of farms totalling 342MW.

Given this growth, it’s perfectly understandable therefore, to see the listed Scandinavian business begin to look to new markets overseas. It keeps the shareholders happy and it builds on lessons learnt closer to home.

The two January deals are a testament to this – with the firm buying a proposed 130MW Nordic, permit-pending project, together with exclusivity rights to develop and build with Argyll Estates within 24 months on the Scottish coast.

Coming just before the conference doors open for EWEA 2013, the deals speak volumes for where this aspiring Swedish developer places trust when working overseas.

And while eyes may roll for advocates within Eastern Europe who feel that they’ve lost out to such investment, for emerging states it’s not all bad news.

Rather, it’s an ever-present reminder of what developers are looking for when it comes to selecting a site on which to develop, build and invest.

As we discussed on Friday, Scotland has made big bets backing clean energy technology, something that’s helped in part by an eloquent political leader.

Similarly, Norway has recognised the benefits of working together with its neighbours to create s stable platform for investment and its ties with Sweden are now strong.

Combined, these partnerships, the firmly established political platform and the simple geography, make overseas investment less surprising than you’d think.

A salutary tale from an ambitious and aspiring developer, then. Particularly as an expected 10,000 delegates head to Vienna with thought of capitalising on new regions, territories and potential new revenue streams never far from their mind.

Never underestimate the power of surprise.

That’s certainly a trick that the management team at Arise Windpower have achieved over recent months, as its business continues to boom.

Having continued to steadily sign a series of deals, that have enabled them to quickly expand outside of their core domestic market, it’s evident that confidence and momentum grows.

And it’s with good reason.

In the space of just five years, the Swedish company’s local market investments have helped the firm to consolidate national wind power efforts and in return, build up a healthy portfolio of farms totalling 342MW.

Given this growth, it’s perfectly understandable therefore, to see the listed Scandinavian business begin to look to new markets overseas. It keeps the shareholders happy and it builds on lessons learnt closer to home.

The two January deals are a testament to this – with the firm buying a proposed 130MW Nordic, permit-pending project, together with exclusivity rights to develop and build with Argyll Estates within 24 months on the Scottish coast.

Coming just before the conference doors open for EWEA 2013, the deals speak volumes for where this aspiring Swedish developer places trust when working overseas.

And while eyes may roll for advocates within Eastern Europe who feel that they’ve lost out to such investment, for emerging states it’s not all bad news.

Rather, it’s an ever-present reminder of what developers are looking for when it comes to selecting a site on which to develop, build and invest.

As we discussed on Friday, Scotland has made big bets backing clean energy technology, something that’s helped in part by an eloquent political leader.

Similarly, Norway has recognised the benefits of working together with its neighbours to create s stable platform for investment and its ties with Sweden are now strong.

Combined, these partnerships, the firmly established political platform and the simple geography, make overseas investment less surprising than you’d think.

A salutary tale from an ambitious and aspiring developer, then. Particularly as an expected 10,000 delegates head to Vienna with thought of capitalising on new regions, territories and potential new revenue streams never far from their mind.

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Not a member yet?

Become a member of the 6,500-strong A Word About Wind community today, and gain access to our premium content, exclusive lead generation and investment opportunities.