Strategic site selection

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Adam Barber
April 11, 2011
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Strategic site selection

Is the ability to build, manage and exploit renewable energy in the desert really so far fetched? And if it isn’t, what will it mean for the future of the European energy market?

It was a question that got me thinking after I’d spotted one of the HSBC adverts while passing through Dallas airport last week. It was the one where they suggest that, “…0.3% of Saharan solar energy could power Europe…

Okay, so it’s related to solar power as opposed to wind energy but nevertheless it’s a thought-provoking statistic that gets you thinking. Especially following Kenya’s ongoing efforts to install 375 turbines in the Chalbi Desert – a remote location that is said to provide a constant, steady wind.

And for Europe of course, the ability to select a site where the turbines never stop turning is proving to be an increasing challenge. New farms just can’t afford to have that much down time.

Which brings us to the deserts of North Africa and perhaps even, the Middle East. With engineers already working hard to crack the superconductivity challenge – and by proxy, tackle the issue of intermittent wind speeds – can we really expect the likes of the Middle East to look beyond oil, reap the benefits of renewables vie for the wind energy crown?

Is the ability to build, manage and exploit renewable energy in the desert really so far fetched? And if it isn’t, what will it mean for the future of the European energy market?

It was a question that got me thinking after I’d spotted one of the HSBC adverts while passing through Dallas airport last week. It was the one where they suggest that, “…0.3% of Saharan solar energy could power Europe…

Okay, so it’s related to solar power as opposed to wind energy but nevertheless it’s a thought-provoking statistic that gets you thinking. Especially following Kenya’s ongoing efforts to install 375 turbines in the Chalbi Desert – a remote location that is said to provide a constant, steady wind.

And for Europe of course, the ability to select a site where the turbines never stop turning is proving to be an increasing challenge. New farms just can’t afford to have that much down time.

Which brings us to the deserts of North Africa and perhaps even, the Middle East. With engineers already working hard to crack the superconductivity challenge – and by proxy, tackle the issue of intermittent wind speeds – can we really expect the likes of the Middle East to look beyond oil, reap the benefits of renewables vie for the wind energy crown?

Is the ability to build, manage and exploit renewable energy in the desert really so far fetched? And if it isn’t, what will it mean for the future of the European energy market?

It was a question that got me thinking after I’d spotted one of the HSBC adverts while passing through Dallas airport last week. It was the one where they suggest that, “…0.3% of Saharan solar energy could power Europe…

Okay, so it’s related to solar power as opposed to wind energy but nevertheless it’s a thought-provoking statistic that gets you thinking. Especially following Kenya’s ongoing efforts to install 375 turbines in the Chalbi Desert – a remote location that is said to provide a constant, steady wind.

And for Europe of course, the ability to select a site where the turbines never stop turning is proving to be an increasing challenge. New farms just can’t afford to have that much down time.

Which brings us to the deserts of North Africa and perhaps even, the Middle East. With engineers already working hard to crack the superconductivity challenge – and by proxy, tackle the issue of intermittent wind speeds – can we really expect the likes of the Middle East to look beyond oil, reap the benefits of renewables vie for the wind energy crown?

Is the ability to build, manage and exploit renewable energy in the desert really so far fetched? And if it isn’t, what will it mean for the future of the European energy market?

It was a question that got me thinking after I’d spotted one of the HSBC adverts while passing through Dallas airport last week. It was the one where they suggest that, “…0.3% of Saharan solar energy could power Europe…

Okay, so it’s related to solar power as opposed to wind energy but nevertheless it’s a thought-provoking statistic that gets you thinking. Especially following Kenya’s ongoing efforts to install 375 turbines in the Chalbi Desert – a remote location that is said to provide a constant, steady wind.

And for Europe of course, the ability to select a site where the turbines never stop turning is proving to be an increasing challenge. New farms just can’t afford to have that much down time.

Which brings us to the deserts of North Africa and perhaps even, the Middle East. With engineers already working hard to crack the superconductivity challenge – and by proxy, tackle the issue of intermittent wind speeds – can we really expect the likes of the Middle East to look beyond oil, reap the benefits of renewables vie for the wind energy crown?

Is the ability to build, manage and exploit renewable energy in the desert really so far fetched? And if it isn’t, what will it mean for the future of the European energy market?

It was a question that got me thinking after I’d spotted one of the HSBC adverts while passing through Dallas airport last week. It was the one where they suggest that, “…0.3% of Saharan solar energy could power Europe…

Okay, so it’s related to solar power as opposed to wind energy but nevertheless it’s a thought-provoking statistic that gets you thinking. Especially following Kenya’s ongoing efforts to install 375 turbines in the Chalbi Desert – a remote location that is said to provide a constant, steady wind.

And for Europe of course, the ability to select a site where the turbines never stop turning is proving to be an increasing challenge. New farms just can’t afford to have that much down time.

Which brings us to the deserts of North Africa and perhaps even, the Middle East. With engineers already working hard to crack the superconductivity challenge – and by proxy, tackle the issue of intermittent wind speeds – can we really expect the likes of the Middle East to look beyond oil, reap the benefits of renewables vie for the wind energy crown?

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Not a member yet?

Become a member of the 6,500-strong A Word About Wind community today, and gain access to our premium content, exclusive lead generation and investment opportunities.