Rising up through the ranks

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Adam Barber
September 16, 2012
This content is from our archive. Some formatting or links may be broken.
This content is from our archive. Some formatting or links may be broken.
Rising up through the ranks

For Northern Europe, September marks the end of summer and a return to the desk, as holidays fade into memories and as to do lists once again begin to grow.

However, while executives and their teams have taken time off for a break, it’s been business as usual for the project management, operations and construction personnel, who have been keen to take advantage of the weather window.

Of course, getting the kit on the ground, up and operational is an incessant challenge. However, for the Europeans, this year it’s been more so than most; given the temperamental summer and the unseasonal wet and windy weather.

For the already stretched support teams, that’s led to a huge ramp up in the hours worked and a situation in which resources are pushed to the limit.

But this situation need not always be the case. Moreover, it’s perhaps more a telling indictment of the state of the market and its growing pains, than a true indicator of things to come.

Nevertheless, with the hours worked continuing to ramp up, for the aspiring consultancies and the project teams rising up through the ranks, it’s easy to see this new world order as the new normal. Particularly when for these small, specialist units, the hours worked all too often equates into revenue earned.

However, while that might solve short-term cash concerns, in the medium to longer term, that’s a potentially dangerous scenario. Since while profitability is inevitably only one motivating element, for any emerging enterprise it can quickly cloud wider commercial judgement.

More worrying still, is that as the reliance from developers, utilities on these smaller support service operations grows, it’s difficult for all parties to make the switch.

Teams working on the ground find themselves with less and less time to take a step back from the daily operations and get a clearer steer on where the market is headed, while those firms that have come to rely on their support find themselves increasingly at risk.

And that’s a risk not just from an operational and delivery standpoint but moreover from a wider commercial growth perspective too.

Put bluntly, as developer ambitions grow, it’s a concern if the only limiting factor is the available resource of the partners working alongside them.

However, there’s a final twist. Since for all the while that this scenario holds court, there’s little room for other market players to win work and enter the room. Players that might have plenty more market muscle but that might lack the specifics of operational experience.

At some stage, this divide has to be bridged. Particularly as the industry continues to rapidly mature.

For the teams on the coalface, that means investing time now, in better understanding this switch and making plans to address it.

For developers meanwhile, it’s a timely reminder that longer term risk and resource planning, is paramount to future success.

For Northern Europe, September marks the end of summer and a return to the desk, as holidays fade into memories and as to do lists once again begin to grow.

However, while executives and their teams have taken time off for a break, it’s been business as usual for the project management, operations and construction personnel, who have been keen to take advantage of the weather window.

Of course, getting the kit on the ground, up and operational is an incessant challenge. However, for the Europeans, this year it’s been more so than most; given the temperamental summer and the unseasonal wet and windy weather.

For the already stretched support teams, that’s led to a huge ramp up in the hours worked and a situation in which resources are pushed to the limit.

But this situation need not always be the case. Moreover, it’s perhaps more a telling indictment of the state of the market and its growing pains, than a true indicator of things to come.

Nevertheless, with the hours worked continuing to ramp up, for the aspiring consultancies and the project teams rising up through the ranks, it’s easy to see this new world order as the new normal. Particularly when for these small, specialist units, the hours worked all too often equates into revenue earned.

However, while that might solve short-term cash concerns, in the medium to longer term, that’s a potentially dangerous scenario. Since while profitability is inevitably only one motivating element, for any emerging enterprise it can quickly cloud wider commercial judgement.

More worrying still, is that as the reliance from developers, utilities on these smaller support service operations grows, it’s difficult for all parties to make the switch.

Teams working on the ground find themselves with less and less time to take a step back from the daily operations and get a clearer steer on where the market is headed, while those firms that have come to rely on their support find themselves increasingly at risk.

And that’s a risk not just from an operational and delivery standpoint but moreover from a wider commercial growth perspective too.

Put bluntly, as developer ambitions grow, it’s a concern if the only limiting factor is the available resource of the partners working alongside them.

However, there’s a final twist. Since for all the while that this scenario holds court, there’s little room for other market players to win work and enter the room. Players that might have plenty more market muscle but that might lack the specifics of operational experience.

At some stage, this divide has to be bridged. Particularly as the industry continues to rapidly mature.

For the teams on the coalface, that means investing time now, in better understanding this switch and making plans to address it.

For developers meanwhile, it’s a timely reminder that longer term risk and resource planning, is paramount to future success.

For Northern Europe, September marks the end of summer and a return to the desk, as holidays fade into memories and as to do lists once again begin to grow.

However, while executives and their teams have taken time off for a break, it’s been business as usual for the project management, operations and construction personnel, who have been keen to take advantage of the weather window.

Of course, getting the kit on the ground, up and operational is an incessant challenge. However, for the Europeans, this year it’s been more so than most; given the temperamental summer and the unseasonal wet and windy weather.

For the already stretched support teams, that’s led to a huge ramp up in the hours worked and a situation in which resources are pushed to the limit.

But this situation need not always be the case. Moreover, it’s perhaps more a telling indictment of the state of the market and its growing pains, than a true indicator of things to come.

Nevertheless, with the hours worked continuing to ramp up, for the aspiring consultancies and the project teams rising up through the ranks, it’s easy to see this new world order as the new normal. Particularly when for these small, specialist units, the hours worked all too often equates into revenue earned.

However, while that might solve short-term cash concerns, in the medium to longer term, that’s a potentially dangerous scenario. Since while profitability is inevitably only one motivating element, for any emerging enterprise it can quickly cloud wider commercial judgement.

More worrying still, is that as the reliance from developers, utilities on these smaller support service operations grows, it’s difficult for all parties to make the switch.

Teams working on the ground find themselves with less and less time to take a step back from the daily operations and get a clearer steer on where the market is headed, while those firms that have come to rely on their support find themselves increasingly at risk.

And that’s a risk not just from an operational and delivery standpoint but moreover from a wider commercial growth perspective too.

Put bluntly, as developer ambitions grow, it’s a concern if the only limiting factor is the available resource of the partners working alongside them.

However, there’s a final twist. Since for all the while that this scenario holds court, there’s little room for other market players to win work and enter the room. Players that might have plenty more market muscle but that might lack the specifics of operational experience.

At some stage, this divide has to be bridged. Particularly as the industry continues to rapidly mature.

For the teams on the coalface, that means investing time now, in better understanding this switch and making plans to address it.

For developers meanwhile, it’s a timely reminder that longer term risk and resource planning, is paramount to future success.

For Northern Europe, September marks the end of summer and a return to the desk, as holidays fade into memories and as to do lists once again begin to grow.

However, while executives and their teams have taken time off for a break, it’s been business as usual for the project management, operations and construction personnel, who have been keen to take advantage of the weather window.

Of course, getting the kit on the ground, up and operational is an incessant challenge. However, for the Europeans, this year it’s been more so than most; given the temperamental summer and the unseasonal wet and windy weather.

For the already stretched support teams, that’s led to a huge ramp up in the hours worked and a situation in which resources are pushed to the limit.

But this situation need not always be the case. Moreover, it’s perhaps more a telling indictment of the state of the market and its growing pains, than a true indicator of things to come.

Nevertheless, with the hours worked continuing to ramp up, for the aspiring consultancies and the project teams rising up through the ranks, it’s easy to see this new world order as the new normal. Particularly when for these small, specialist units, the hours worked all too often equates into revenue earned.

However, while that might solve short-term cash concerns, in the medium to longer term, that’s a potentially dangerous scenario. Since while profitability is inevitably only one motivating element, for any emerging enterprise it can quickly cloud wider commercial judgement.

More worrying still, is that as the reliance from developers, utilities on these smaller support service operations grows, it’s difficult for all parties to make the switch.

Teams working on the ground find themselves with less and less time to take a step back from the daily operations and get a clearer steer on where the market is headed, while those firms that have come to rely on their support find themselves increasingly at risk.

And that’s a risk not just from an operational and delivery standpoint but moreover from a wider commercial growth perspective too.

Put bluntly, as developer ambitions grow, it’s a concern if the only limiting factor is the available resource of the partners working alongside them.

However, there’s a final twist. Since for all the while that this scenario holds court, there’s little room for other market players to win work and enter the room. Players that might have plenty more market muscle but that might lack the specifics of operational experience.

At some stage, this divide has to be bridged. Particularly as the industry continues to rapidly mature.

For the teams on the coalface, that means investing time now, in better understanding this switch and making plans to address it.

For developers meanwhile, it’s a timely reminder that longer term risk and resource planning, is paramount to future success.

For Northern Europe, September marks the end of summer and a return to the desk, as holidays fade into memories and as to do lists once again begin to grow.

However, while executives and their teams have taken time off for a break, it’s been business as usual for the project management, operations and construction personnel, who have been keen to take advantage of the weather window.

Of course, getting the kit on the ground, up and operational is an incessant challenge. However, for the Europeans, this year it’s been more so than most; given the temperamental summer and the unseasonal wet and windy weather.

For the already stretched support teams, that’s led to a huge ramp up in the hours worked and a situation in which resources are pushed to the limit.

But this situation need not always be the case. Moreover, it’s perhaps more a telling indictment of the state of the market and its growing pains, than a true indicator of things to come.

Nevertheless, with the hours worked continuing to ramp up, for the aspiring consultancies and the project teams rising up through the ranks, it’s easy to see this new world order as the new normal. Particularly when for these small, specialist units, the hours worked all too often equates into revenue earned.

However, while that might solve short-term cash concerns, in the medium to longer term, that’s a potentially dangerous scenario. Since while profitability is inevitably only one motivating element, for any emerging enterprise it can quickly cloud wider commercial judgement.

More worrying still, is that as the reliance from developers, utilities on these smaller support service operations grows, it’s difficult for all parties to make the switch.

Teams working on the ground find themselves with less and less time to take a step back from the daily operations and get a clearer steer on where the market is headed, while those firms that have come to rely on their support find themselves increasingly at risk.

And that’s a risk not just from an operational and delivery standpoint but moreover from a wider commercial growth perspective too.

Put bluntly, as developer ambitions grow, it’s a concern if the only limiting factor is the available resource of the partners working alongside them.

However, there’s a final twist. Since for all the while that this scenario holds court, there’s little room for other market players to win work and enter the room. Players that might have plenty more market muscle but that might lack the specifics of operational experience.

At some stage, this divide has to be bridged. Particularly as the industry continues to rapidly mature.

For the teams on the coalface, that means investing time now, in better understanding this switch and making plans to address it.

For developers meanwhile, it’s a timely reminder that longer term risk and resource planning, is paramount to future success.

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Not a member yet?

Become a member of the 6,500-strong A Word About Wind community today, and gain access to our premium content, exclusive lead generation and investment opportunities.