Reports, promises & predictions

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Adam Barber
May 13, 2011
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Reports, promises & predictions

This week the markets have been awash with reports, promises and predictions.

Kicking off proceedings, we had a report from the government-established climate change committee, raising questions about the high cost of offshore wind.

Something that, when Soe-Jenson, Vestas’ chief executive announced a commitment to Sheerness dockyard – with the potential to create 2,000 jobs – was described as a development that, “…could not be worse for us.”

And then of course we had the United Nations, who, in a spectacular moment of bad timing, managed to let slip the findings of its major international study right in the middle of all of this. The result?

Few people have yet to truly digest the somewhat impressive suggestion that, were the conditions right, renewable energy could provide for 80% of the world’s needs after 2050.

Three major developments in just over three days. That’s a lot for everyone to digest. Particularly given Soe-Jensen’s barbed remark that while Vesta’s has obtained exclusive rights to develop the UK port, it was still a deal that was as much reliant on government policy, as it was on corporate intent.

To quote the man direct, it would be a, “shame”, if a great new job opportunity at Sheerness was lost. The offshore hub saga is far from over.

This week the markets have been awash with reports, promises and predictions.

Kicking off proceedings, we had a report from the government-established climate change committee, raising questions about the high cost of offshore wind.

Something that, when Soe-Jenson, Vestas’ chief executive announced a commitment to Sheerness dockyard – with the potential to create 2,000 jobs – was described as a development that, “…could not be worse for us.”

And then of course we had the United Nations, who, in a spectacular moment of bad timing, managed to let slip the findings of its major international study right in the middle of all of this. The result?

Few people have yet to truly digest the somewhat impressive suggestion that, were the conditions right, renewable energy could provide for 80% of the world’s needs after 2050.

Three major developments in just over three days. That’s a lot for everyone to digest. Particularly given Soe-Jensen’s barbed remark that while Vesta’s has obtained exclusive rights to develop the UK port, it was still a deal that was as much reliant on government policy, as it was on corporate intent.

To quote the man direct, it would be a, “shame”, if a great new job opportunity at Sheerness was lost. The offshore hub saga is far from over.

This week the markets have been awash with reports, promises and predictions.

Kicking off proceedings, we had a report from the government-established climate change committee, raising questions about the high cost of offshore wind.

Something that, when Soe-Jenson, Vestas’ chief executive announced a commitment to Sheerness dockyard – with the potential to create 2,000 jobs – was described as a development that, “…could not be worse for us.”

And then of course we had the United Nations, who, in a spectacular moment of bad timing, managed to let slip the findings of its major international study right in the middle of all of this. The result?

Few people have yet to truly digest the somewhat impressive suggestion that, were the conditions right, renewable energy could provide for 80% of the world’s needs after 2050.

Three major developments in just over three days. That’s a lot for everyone to digest. Particularly given Soe-Jensen’s barbed remark that while Vesta’s has obtained exclusive rights to develop the UK port, it was still a deal that was as much reliant on government policy, as it was on corporate intent.

To quote the man direct, it would be a, “shame”, if a great new job opportunity at Sheerness was lost. The offshore hub saga is far from over.

This week the markets have been awash with reports, promises and predictions.

Kicking off proceedings, we had a report from the government-established climate change committee, raising questions about the high cost of offshore wind.

Something that, when Soe-Jenson, Vestas’ chief executive announced a commitment to Sheerness dockyard – with the potential to create 2,000 jobs – was described as a development that, “…could not be worse for us.”

And then of course we had the United Nations, who, in a spectacular moment of bad timing, managed to let slip the findings of its major international study right in the middle of all of this. The result?

Few people have yet to truly digest the somewhat impressive suggestion that, were the conditions right, renewable energy could provide for 80% of the world’s needs after 2050.

Three major developments in just over three days. That’s a lot for everyone to digest. Particularly given Soe-Jensen’s barbed remark that while Vesta’s has obtained exclusive rights to develop the UK port, it was still a deal that was as much reliant on government policy, as it was on corporate intent.

To quote the man direct, it would be a, “shame”, if a great new job opportunity at Sheerness was lost. The offshore hub saga is far from over.

This week the markets have been awash with reports, promises and predictions.

Kicking off proceedings, we had a report from the government-established climate change committee, raising questions about the high cost of offshore wind.

Something that, when Soe-Jenson, Vestas’ chief executive announced a commitment to Sheerness dockyard – with the potential to create 2,000 jobs – was described as a development that, “…could not be worse for us.”

And then of course we had the United Nations, who, in a spectacular moment of bad timing, managed to let slip the findings of its major international study right in the middle of all of this. The result?

Few people have yet to truly digest the somewhat impressive suggestion that, were the conditions right, renewable energy could provide for 80% of the world’s needs after 2050.

Three major developments in just over three days. That’s a lot for everyone to digest. Particularly given Soe-Jensen’s barbed remark that while Vesta’s has obtained exclusive rights to develop the UK port, it was still a deal that was as much reliant on government policy, as it was on corporate intent.

To quote the man direct, it would be a, “shame”, if a great new job opportunity at Sheerness was lost. The offshore hub saga is far from over.

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Not a member yet?

Become a member of the 6,500-strong A Word About Wind community today, and gain access to our premium content, exclusive lead generation and investment opportunities.