Power People

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Adam Barber
August 29, 2012
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This content is from our archive. Some formatting or links may be broken.
Power People

As an emerging market expands, so too does the multitude of businesses that have grown with it. It’s not rocket science, but then again, it’s not child’s play either.

What’s more, as industry ambitions escalate, some of the more entrepreneurial companies gain an early leader advantage and, in the subsequent feeding frenzy, forget to keep one eye on the road ahead.

Staff get hired. Teams get built. And new briefs roll in.

Great news for business and great news for senior management too – who all too quickly become focused on margins, efficiencies and incremental refinements – while product innovation and expansion into new territories is left to play second fiddle.

It’s a familiar pattern. And it’s one in which the wind energy sector has been by no means immune.

Only that’s not where the story ends, because as the market begins to self-regulate and as businesses cut overheads, fall back into line and reshuffle the executive pack, there’s a wider industry dynamic that comes into play.

And it’s something that makes many senior executives squirm.

Particularly those who might be confident in their ability to offer specialist sector expertise but that might not be so comfortable when it comes to managing the complex dynamic of the company’s wider industry reputation, influence and brand.

Yes, influence and brand. In a rapidly expanding market, they’re two words that are loved and loathed in equal measure. And for the vast majority, are concepts that are tucked neatly under the carpet; left to the reserve of the dedicated few.

Only that’s not really how it’s meant to be.

What’s more, despite the legacy and the market noise, it’s often not a genuine reflection of exactly where the true power, innovation and leadership really sits.

So it’s with this in mind that today I’m very pleased to launch a project that we’re calling, the Top 100 Power People.

It’s an entirely independent report that will unearth some of the as yet unsung market heroes and that will assess and quantify where the power lies and perhaps most importantly, who really calls the shots.

The report will be published in December and between now and then, we’ll be asking for your input and views. Who do you think will be the next generation of leaders – the as yet unsung heroes and the industry influencers of tomorrow?

As an emerging market expands, so too does the multitude of businesses that have grown with it. It’s not rocket science, but then again, it’s not child’s play either.

What’s more, as industry ambitions escalate, some of the more entrepreneurial companies gain an early leader advantage and, in the subsequent feeding frenzy, forget to keep one eye on the road ahead.

Staff get hired. Teams get built. And new briefs roll in.

Great news for business and great news for senior management too – who all too quickly become focused on margins, efficiencies and incremental refinements – while product innovation and expansion into new territories is left to play second fiddle.

It’s a familiar pattern. And it’s one in which the wind energy sector has been by no means immune.

Only that’s not where the story ends, because as the market begins to self-regulate and as businesses cut overheads, fall back into line and reshuffle the executive pack, there’s a wider industry dynamic that comes into play.

And it’s something that makes many senior executives squirm.

Particularly those who might be confident in their ability to offer specialist sector expertise but that might not be so comfortable when it comes to managing the complex dynamic of the company’s wider industry reputation, influence and brand.

Yes, influence and brand. In a rapidly expanding market, they’re two words that are loved and loathed in equal measure. And for the vast majority, are concepts that are tucked neatly under the carpet; left to the reserve of the dedicated few.

Only that’s not really how it’s meant to be.

What’s more, despite the legacy and the market noise, it’s often not a genuine reflection of exactly where the true power, innovation and leadership really sits.

So it’s with this in mind that today I’m very pleased to launch a project that we’re calling, the Top 100 Power People.

It’s an entirely independent report that will unearth some of the as yet unsung market heroes and that will assess and quantify where the power lies and perhaps most importantly, who really calls the shots.

The report will be published in December and between now and then, we’ll be asking for your input and views. Who do you think will be the next generation of leaders – the as yet unsung heroes and the industry influencers of tomorrow?

As an emerging market expands, so too does the multitude of businesses that have grown with it. It’s not rocket science, but then again, it’s not child’s play either.

What’s more, as industry ambitions escalate, some of the more entrepreneurial companies gain an early leader advantage and, in the subsequent feeding frenzy, forget to keep one eye on the road ahead.

Staff get hired. Teams get built. And new briefs roll in.

Great news for business and great news for senior management too – who all too quickly become focused on margins, efficiencies and incremental refinements – while product innovation and expansion into new territories is left to play second fiddle.

It’s a familiar pattern. And it’s one in which the wind energy sector has been by no means immune.

Only that’s not where the story ends, because as the market begins to self-regulate and as businesses cut overheads, fall back into line and reshuffle the executive pack, there’s a wider industry dynamic that comes into play.

And it’s something that makes many senior executives squirm.

Particularly those who might be confident in their ability to offer specialist sector expertise but that might not be so comfortable when it comes to managing the complex dynamic of the company’s wider industry reputation, influence and brand.

Yes, influence and brand. In a rapidly expanding market, they’re two words that are loved and loathed in equal measure. And for the vast majority, are concepts that are tucked neatly under the carpet; left to the reserve of the dedicated few.

Only that’s not really how it’s meant to be.

What’s more, despite the legacy and the market noise, it’s often not a genuine reflection of exactly where the true power, innovation and leadership really sits.

So it’s with this in mind that today I’m very pleased to launch a project that we’re calling, the Top 100 Power People.

It’s an entirely independent report that will unearth some of the as yet unsung market heroes and that will assess and quantify where the power lies and perhaps most importantly, who really calls the shots.

The report will be published in December and between now and then, we’ll be asking for your input and views. Who do you think will be the next generation of leaders – the as yet unsung heroes and the industry influencers of tomorrow?

As an emerging market expands, so too does the multitude of businesses that have grown with it. It’s not rocket science, but then again, it’s not child’s play either.

What’s more, as industry ambitions escalate, some of the more entrepreneurial companies gain an early leader advantage and, in the subsequent feeding frenzy, forget to keep one eye on the road ahead.

Staff get hired. Teams get built. And new briefs roll in.

Great news for business and great news for senior management too – who all too quickly become focused on margins, efficiencies and incremental refinements – while product innovation and expansion into new territories is left to play second fiddle.

It’s a familiar pattern. And it’s one in which the wind energy sector has been by no means immune.

Only that’s not where the story ends, because as the market begins to self-regulate and as businesses cut overheads, fall back into line and reshuffle the executive pack, there’s a wider industry dynamic that comes into play.

And it’s something that makes many senior executives squirm.

Particularly those who might be confident in their ability to offer specialist sector expertise but that might not be so comfortable when it comes to managing the complex dynamic of the company’s wider industry reputation, influence and brand.

Yes, influence and brand. In a rapidly expanding market, they’re two words that are loved and loathed in equal measure. And for the vast majority, are concepts that are tucked neatly under the carpet; left to the reserve of the dedicated few.

Only that’s not really how it’s meant to be.

What’s more, despite the legacy and the market noise, it’s often not a genuine reflection of exactly where the true power, innovation and leadership really sits.

So it’s with this in mind that today I’m very pleased to launch a project that we’re calling, the Top 100 Power People.

It’s an entirely independent report that will unearth some of the as yet unsung market heroes and that will assess and quantify where the power lies and perhaps most importantly, who really calls the shots.

The report will be published in December and between now and then, we’ll be asking for your input and views. Who do you think will be the next generation of leaders – the as yet unsung heroes and the industry influencers of tomorrow?

As an emerging market expands, so too does the multitude of businesses that have grown with it. It’s not rocket science, but then again, it’s not child’s play either.

What’s more, as industry ambitions escalate, some of the more entrepreneurial companies gain an early leader advantage and, in the subsequent feeding frenzy, forget to keep one eye on the road ahead.

Staff get hired. Teams get built. And new briefs roll in.

Great news for business and great news for senior management too – who all too quickly become focused on margins, efficiencies and incremental refinements – while product innovation and expansion into new territories is left to play second fiddle.

It’s a familiar pattern. And it’s one in which the wind energy sector has been by no means immune.

Only that’s not where the story ends, because as the market begins to self-regulate and as businesses cut overheads, fall back into line and reshuffle the executive pack, there’s a wider industry dynamic that comes into play.

And it’s something that makes many senior executives squirm.

Particularly those who might be confident in their ability to offer specialist sector expertise but that might not be so comfortable when it comes to managing the complex dynamic of the company’s wider industry reputation, influence and brand.

Yes, influence and brand. In a rapidly expanding market, they’re two words that are loved and loathed in equal measure. And for the vast majority, are concepts that are tucked neatly under the carpet; left to the reserve of the dedicated few.

Only that’s not really how it’s meant to be.

What’s more, despite the legacy and the market noise, it’s often not a genuine reflection of exactly where the true power, innovation and leadership really sits.

So it’s with this in mind that today I’m very pleased to launch a project that we’re calling, the Top 100 Power People.

It’s an entirely independent report that will unearth some of the as yet unsung market heroes and that will assess and quantify where the power lies and perhaps most importantly, who really calls the shots.

The report will be published in December and between now and then, we’ll be asking for your input and views. Who do you think will be the next generation of leaders – the as yet unsung heroes and the industry influencers of tomorrow?

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Not a member yet?

Become a member of the 6,500-strong A Word About Wind community today, and gain access to our premium content, exclusive lead generation and investment opportunities.