Oil and Gas firms: Caught napping?

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Adam Barber
September 23, 2012
This content is from our archive. Some formatting or links may be broken.
This content is from our archive. Some formatting or links may be broken.
Oil and Gas firms: Caught napping?

Okay, so picture this. You’re a traditional oil and gas based support service business that has, over the past twenty or so years done rather well for yourself.

You’ve grown your market share and you’ve developed a solid and steady customer base. You’ve diversified the business so that you’ve got operations and officers located all over the world and you’re selling your services and experience into one of the most profitable and dependable markets on the planet.

All in all, it’s not bad work. And yes, while you’ve been watching the oil price rise with some element of caution, you remain pretty confident that in the grand scheme of things, a price hike isn’t about to upset the status quo.

Nevertheless, there’s this new energy economy that’s arrived on the scene.

A market that at first was very easy to ignore. Particularly with all the diligent talk of sustainability and climate change. Issues that, while noble causes, aren’t exactly going to start generating the base electricity load and power that the western world has come to depend on so fundamentally. At least, they’re not going to be able to do so overnight.

And so because of this – and despite all the greenwash – as a support service business focused on what have always been traditionally stable and growing markets, you’ve turned your back on renewable energy. And you’ve left it to the die-hard fans and to those truly committed individuals.

But here’s the thing. Suddenly those individuals have switched from baggy trousers to sharp suits. And they’ve changed their tune too.

For the truly ambitious, no longer are they talking up the benefits that such power generating technology has on climate change and the planet. Instead, that’s become a secondary benefit.

And it’s become secondary to two fundamental issues – energy security and economic independence.

Big issues. And issues that have caught the oil and gas markets napping.

Particularly when it comes to the increasingly delicate matter of intercontinental energy transmission, future fuel imports and a steadily rising cost, to boot.

So it’s with this in mind, that these businesses begin to take a second look. And begin to see the world of renewable energy in a new light.

In Husum last week, there was a growing exhibitor presence of companies that have already made their mark within oil and gas and are now looking to repeat the trick.

However, contrary to popular belief, their success is as much dependent on the ability to listen and learn from this emerging market, as it is to educate and teach.

Success then for these firms, is first and foremost about finding a credible and commercially relevant position, from which to pitch, not preach.

Okay, so picture this. You’re a traditional oil and gas based support service business that has, over the past twenty or so years done rather well for yourself.

You’ve grown your market share and you’ve developed a solid and steady customer base. You’ve diversified the business so that you’ve got operations and officers located all over the world and you’re selling your services and experience into one of the most profitable and dependable markets on the planet.

All in all, it’s not bad work. And yes, while you’ve been watching the oil price rise with some element of caution, you remain pretty confident that in the grand scheme of things, a price hike isn’t about to upset the status quo.

Nevertheless, there’s this new energy economy that’s arrived on the scene.

A market that at first was very easy to ignore. Particularly with all the diligent talk of sustainability and climate change. Issues that, while noble causes, aren’t exactly going to start generating the base electricity load and power that the western world has come to depend on so fundamentally. At least, they’re not going to be able to do so overnight.

And so because of this – and despite all the greenwash – as a support service business focused on what have always been traditionally stable and growing markets, you’ve turned your back on renewable energy. And you’ve left it to the die-hard fans and to those truly committed individuals.

But here’s the thing. Suddenly those individuals have switched from baggy trousers to sharp suits. And they’ve changed their tune too.

For the truly ambitious, no longer are they talking up the benefits that such power generating technology has on climate change and the planet. Instead, that’s become a secondary benefit.

And it’s become secondary to two fundamental issues – energy security and economic independence.

Big issues. And issues that have caught the oil and gas markets napping.

Particularly when it comes to the increasingly delicate matter of intercontinental energy transmission, future fuel imports and a steadily rising cost, to boot.

So it’s with this in mind, that these businesses begin to take a second look. And begin to see the world of renewable energy in a new light.

In Husum last week, there was a growing exhibitor presence of companies that have already made their mark within oil and gas and are now looking to repeat the trick.

However, contrary to popular belief, their success is as much dependent on the ability to listen and learn from this emerging market, as it is to educate and teach.

Success then for these firms, is first and foremost about finding a credible and commercially relevant position, from which to pitch, not preach.

Okay, so picture this. You’re a traditional oil and gas based support service business that has, over the past twenty or so years done rather well for yourself.

You’ve grown your market share and you’ve developed a solid and steady customer base. You’ve diversified the business so that you’ve got operations and officers located all over the world and you’re selling your services and experience into one of the most profitable and dependable markets on the planet.

All in all, it’s not bad work. And yes, while you’ve been watching the oil price rise with some element of caution, you remain pretty confident that in the grand scheme of things, a price hike isn’t about to upset the status quo.

Nevertheless, there’s this new energy economy that’s arrived on the scene.

A market that at first was very easy to ignore. Particularly with all the diligent talk of sustainability and climate change. Issues that, while noble causes, aren’t exactly going to start generating the base electricity load and power that the western world has come to depend on so fundamentally. At least, they’re not going to be able to do so overnight.

And so because of this – and despite all the greenwash – as a support service business focused on what have always been traditionally stable and growing markets, you’ve turned your back on renewable energy. And you’ve left it to the die-hard fans and to those truly committed individuals.

But here’s the thing. Suddenly those individuals have switched from baggy trousers to sharp suits. And they’ve changed their tune too.

For the truly ambitious, no longer are they talking up the benefits that such power generating technology has on climate change and the planet. Instead, that’s become a secondary benefit.

And it’s become secondary to two fundamental issues – energy security and economic independence.

Big issues. And issues that have caught the oil and gas markets napping.

Particularly when it comes to the increasingly delicate matter of intercontinental energy transmission, future fuel imports and a steadily rising cost, to boot.

So it’s with this in mind, that these businesses begin to take a second look. And begin to see the world of renewable energy in a new light.

In Husum last week, there was a growing exhibitor presence of companies that have already made their mark within oil and gas and are now looking to repeat the trick.

However, contrary to popular belief, their success is as much dependent on the ability to listen and learn from this emerging market, as it is to educate and teach.

Success then for these firms, is first and foremost about finding a credible and commercially relevant position, from which to pitch, not preach.

Okay, so picture this. You’re a traditional oil and gas based support service business that has, over the past twenty or so years done rather well for yourself.

You’ve grown your market share and you’ve developed a solid and steady customer base. You’ve diversified the business so that you’ve got operations and officers located all over the world and you’re selling your services and experience into one of the most profitable and dependable markets on the planet.

All in all, it’s not bad work. And yes, while you’ve been watching the oil price rise with some element of caution, you remain pretty confident that in the grand scheme of things, a price hike isn’t about to upset the status quo.

Nevertheless, there’s this new energy economy that’s arrived on the scene.

A market that at first was very easy to ignore. Particularly with all the diligent talk of sustainability and climate change. Issues that, while noble causes, aren’t exactly going to start generating the base electricity load and power that the western world has come to depend on so fundamentally. At least, they’re not going to be able to do so overnight.

And so because of this – and despite all the greenwash – as a support service business focused on what have always been traditionally stable and growing markets, you’ve turned your back on renewable energy. And you’ve left it to the die-hard fans and to those truly committed individuals.

But here’s the thing. Suddenly those individuals have switched from baggy trousers to sharp suits. And they’ve changed their tune too.

For the truly ambitious, no longer are they talking up the benefits that such power generating technology has on climate change and the planet. Instead, that’s become a secondary benefit.

And it’s become secondary to two fundamental issues – energy security and economic independence.

Big issues. And issues that have caught the oil and gas markets napping.

Particularly when it comes to the increasingly delicate matter of intercontinental energy transmission, future fuel imports and a steadily rising cost, to boot.

So it’s with this in mind, that these businesses begin to take a second look. And begin to see the world of renewable energy in a new light.

In Husum last week, there was a growing exhibitor presence of companies that have already made their mark within oil and gas and are now looking to repeat the trick.

However, contrary to popular belief, their success is as much dependent on the ability to listen and learn from this emerging market, as it is to educate and teach.

Success then for these firms, is first and foremost about finding a credible and commercially relevant position, from which to pitch, not preach.

Okay, so picture this. You’re a traditional oil and gas based support service business that has, over the past twenty or so years done rather well for yourself.

You’ve grown your market share and you’ve developed a solid and steady customer base. You’ve diversified the business so that you’ve got operations and officers located all over the world and you’re selling your services and experience into one of the most profitable and dependable markets on the planet.

All in all, it’s not bad work. And yes, while you’ve been watching the oil price rise with some element of caution, you remain pretty confident that in the grand scheme of things, a price hike isn’t about to upset the status quo.

Nevertheless, there’s this new energy economy that’s arrived on the scene.

A market that at first was very easy to ignore. Particularly with all the diligent talk of sustainability and climate change. Issues that, while noble causes, aren’t exactly going to start generating the base electricity load and power that the western world has come to depend on so fundamentally. At least, they’re not going to be able to do so overnight.

And so because of this – and despite all the greenwash – as a support service business focused on what have always been traditionally stable and growing markets, you’ve turned your back on renewable energy. And you’ve left it to the die-hard fans and to those truly committed individuals.

But here’s the thing. Suddenly those individuals have switched from baggy trousers to sharp suits. And they’ve changed their tune too.

For the truly ambitious, no longer are they talking up the benefits that such power generating technology has on climate change and the planet. Instead, that’s become a secondary benefit.

And it’s become secondary to two fundamental issues – energy security and economic independence.

Big issues. And issues that have caught the oil and gas markets napping.

Particularly when it comes to the increasingly delicate matter of intercontinental energy transmission, future fuel imports and a steadily rising cost, to boot.

So it’s with this in mind, that these businesses begin to take a second look. And begin to see the world of renewable energy in a new light.

In Husum last week, there was a growing exhibitor presence of companies that have already made their mark within oil and gas and are now looking to repeat the trick.

However, contrary to popular belief, their success is as much dependent on the ability to listen and learn from this emerging market, as it is to educate and teach.

Success then for these firms, is first and foremost about finding a credible and commercially relevant position, from which to pitch, not preach.

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