Offshore Turbine Progress

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Adam Barber
July 5, 2013
This content is from our archive. Some formatting or links may be broken.
This content is from our archive. Some formatting or links may be broken.
Offshore Turbine Progress

Here’s another milestone for you to consider. Late last week, Vestas celebrated the eighth successful installation of its V112-3.0MW offshore turbine.

The kit is currently being installed at Kårehamn, the 48MW Swedish site. It’s an early-stage initiative that is being developed by E.ON.

But that’s not all. For the units also formed the first part of a shipment of equipment that left Vestas’ pre-assembly facility, in Esbjerg, Denmark.

And perhaps more important still – the shipment marks the start of many more that are expected to take place over the next 12 to 24 months, as the manufacturer delivers at least 145 V112-3.0MW units to expectant developers.

Little wonder then, that senior Vestas executives were in high spirits when it came to trumpeting the news.

And well they might. For the units have been a long while in the making and have been incubated during a torrid time for the European manufacturer.

Indeed, with earlier development costs having over run to the tune of €125 million and with the business having cycled through a number of senior offshore personnel in relatively quick succession, the past few years have seen Vestas conspicuously absent from the offshore wind energy space.

And all this while Siemens has steamed ahead; developing close working relationships with developers and the utilities, building out the footprint of its existing fleet and most recently, having successfully deployed two 6MW demonstration turbines to Gunfleet Sands.

A chance then, for Vestas to start shuffling the pack. And with further offshore momentum already being demonstrated by the Chinese, it’s well timed, too.

For, only last week, Ming Yang unveiled a 6.5MW super compact drive (SCD) machine that will be installed and tested over the next three months and that pushes engineering design further, all over again.

Sure, the Chinese turbine might be all-too quickly dismissed by many European developers – particularly with its two bladed design – however, the anticipated price alone will ensure that at least some will want to take a second look.

Of course, the irony that Ming Yang was once touted as a potential suitor to Vestas during its share price lows won’t be lost on the manufacturing community, here. And Vestas’ renewed manufacturer vigour is intended to draw a line under the previous takeover talk.

Irrespective, for Vestas the battle lines have once again been drawn. And the latest developments are undoubtedly intended to re-establish its commitment to working on wind initiatives in the water.

Setting aside the manufacturer’s retreat from establishing a new facility in Sheerness, Kent, early-stage planning for the 8MW offshore behemoth continues and the sales team are already calculating the commissions.

As the wider market keeps a close eye on cutting costs, let’s hope for everyone’s sake that the increased competition that this new kit facilitates brings about wider market benefits, over and above the need to hit individual sales goals.

Here’s another milestone for you to consider. Late last week, Vestas celebrated the eighth successful installation of its V112-3.0MW offshore turbine.

The kit is currently being installed at Kårehamn, the 48MW Swedish site. It’s an early-stage initiative that is being developed by E.ON.

But that’s not all. For the units also formed the first part of a shipment of equipment that left Vestas’ pre-assembly facility, in Esbjerg, Denmark.

And perhaps more important still – the shipment marks the start of many more that are expected to take place over the next 12 to 24 months, as the manufacturer delivers at least 145 V112-3.0MW units to expectant developers.

Little wonder then, that senior Vestas executives were in high spirits when it came to trumpeting the news.

And well they might. For the units have been a long while in the making and have been incubated during a torrid time for the European manufacturer.

Indeed, with earlier development costs having over run to the tune of €125 million and with the business having cycled through a number of senior offshore personnel in relatively quick succession, the past few years have seen Vestas conspicuously absent from the offshore wind energy space.

And all this while Siemens has steamed ahead; developing close working relationships with developers and the utilities, building out the footprint of its existing fleet and most recently, having successfully deployed two 6MW demonstration turbines to Gunfleet Sands.

A chance then, for Vestas to start shuffling the pack. And with further offshore momentum already being demonstrated by the Chinese, it’s well timed, too.

For, only last week, Ming Yang unveiled a 6.5MW super compact drive (SCD) machine that will be installed and tested over the next three months and that pushes engineering design further, all over again.

Sure, the Chinese turbine might be all-too quickly dismissed by many European developers – particularly with its two bladed design – however, the anticipated price alone will ensure that at least some will want to take a second look.

Of course, the irony that Ming Yang was once touted as a potential suitor to Vestas during its share price lows won’t be lost on the manufacturing community, here. And Vestas’ renewed manufacturer vigour is intended to draw a line under the previous takeover talk.

Irrespective, for Vestas the battle lines have once again been drawn. And the latest developments are undoubtedly intended to re-establish its commitment to working on wind initiatives in the water.

Setting aside the manufacturer’s retreat from establishing a new facility in Sheerness, Kent, early-stage planning for the 8MW offshore behemoth continues and the sales team are already calculating the commissions.

As the wider market keeps a close eye on cutting costs, let’s hope for everyone’s sake that the increased competition that this new kit facilitates brings about wider market benefits, over and above the need to hit individual sales goals.

Here’s another milestone for you to consider. Late last week, Vestas celebrated the eighth successful installation of its V112-3.0MW offshore turbine.

The kit is currently being installed at Kårehamn, the 48MW Swedish site. It’s an early-stage initiative that is being developed by E.ON.

But that’s not all. For the units also formed the first part of a shipment of equipment that left Vestas’ pre-assembly facility, in Esbjerg, Denmark.

And perhaps more important still – the shipment marks the start of many more that are expected to take place over the next 12 to 24 months, as the manufacturer delivers at least 145 V112-3.0MW units to expectant developers.

Little wonder then, that senior Vestas executives were in high spirits when it came to trumpeting the news.

And well they might. For the units have been a long while in the making and have been incubated during a torrid time for the European manufacturer.

Indeed, with earlier development costs having over run to the tune of €125 million and with the business having cycled through a number of senior offshore personnel in relatively quick succession, the past few years have seen Vestas conspicuously absent from the offshore wind energy space.

And all this while Siemens has steamed ahead; developing close working relationships with developers and the utilities, building out the footprint of its existing fleet and most recently, having successfully deployed two 6MW demonstration turbines to Gunfleet Sands.

A chance then, for Vestas to start shuffling the pack. And with further offshore momentum already being demonstrated by the Chinese, it’s well timed, too.

For, only last week, Ming Yang unveiled a 6.5MW super compact drive (SCD) machine that will be installed and tested over the next three months and that pushes engineering design further, all over again.

Sure, the Chinese turbine might be all-too quickly dismissed by many European developers – particularly with its two bladed design – however, the anticipated price alone will ensure that at least some will want to take a second look.

Of course, the irony that Ming Yang was once touted as a potential suitor to Vestas during its share price lows won’t be lost on the manufacturing community, here. And Vestas’ renewed manufacturer vigour is intended to draw a line under the previous takeover talk.

Irrespective, for Vestas the battle lines have once again been drawn. And the latest developments are undoubtedly intended to re-establish its commitment to working on wind initiatives in the water.

Setting aside the manufacturer’s retreat from establishing a new facility in Sheerness, Kent, early-stage planning for the 8MW offshore behemoth continues and the sales team are already calculating the commissions.

As the wider market keeps a close eye on cutting costs, let’s hope for everyone’s sake that the increased competition that this new kit facilitates brings about wider market benefits, over and above the need to hit individual sales goals.

Here’s another milestone for you to consider. Late last week, Vestas celebrated the eighth successful installation of its V112-3.0MW offshore turbine.

The kit is currently being installed at Kårehamn, the 48MW Swedish site. It’s an early-stage initiative that is being developed by E.ON.

But that’s not all. For the units also formed the first part of a shipment of equipment that left Vestas’ pre-assembly facility, in Esbjerg, Denmark.

And perhaps more important still – the shipment marks the start of many more that are expected to take place over the next 12 to 24 months, as the manufacturer delivers at least 145 V112-3.0MW units to expectant developers.

Little wonder then, that senior Vestas executives were in high spirits when it came to trumpeting the news.

And well they might. For the units have been a long while in the making and have been incubated during a torrid time for the European manufacturer.

Indeed, with earlier development costs having over run to the tune of €125 million and with the business having cycled through a number of senior offshore personnel in relatively quick succession, the past few years have seen Vestas conspicuously absent from the offshore wind energy space.

And all this while Siemens has steamed ahead; developing close working relationships with developers and the utilities, building out the footprint of its existing fleet and most recently, having successfully deployed two 6MW demonstration turbines to Gunfleet Sands.

A chance then, for Vestas to start shuffling the pack. And with further offshore momentum already being demonstrated by the Chinese, it’s well timed, too.

For, only last week, Ming Yang unveiled a 6.5MW super compact drive (SCD) machine that will be installed and tested over the next three months and that pushes engineering design further, all over again.

Sure, the Chinese turbine might be all-too quickly dismissed by many European developers – particularly with its two bladed design – however, the anticipated price alone will ensure that at least some will want to take a second look.

Of course, the irony that Ming Yang was once touted as a potential suitor to Vestas during its share price lows won’t be lost on the manufacturing community, here. And Vestas’ renewed manufacturer vigour is intended to draw a line under the previous takeover talk.

Irrespective, for Vestas the battle lines have once again been drawn. And the latest developments are undoubtedly intended to re-establish its commitment to working on wind initiatives in the water.

Setting aside the manufacturer’s retreat from establishing a new facility in Sheerness, Kent, early-stage planning for the 8MW offshore behemoth continues and the sales team are already calculating the commissions.

As the wider market keeps a close eye on cutting costs, let’s hope for everyone’s sake that the increased competition that this new kit facilitates brings about wider market benefits, over and above the need to hit individual sales goals.

Here’s another milestone for you to consider. Late last week, Vestas celebrated the eighth successful installation of its V112-3.0MW offshore turbine.

The kit is currently being installed at Kårehamn, the 48MW Swedish site. It’s an early-stage initiative that is being developed by E.ON.

But that’s not all. For the units also formed the first part of a shipment of equipment that left Vestas’ pre-assembly facility, in Esbjerg, Denmark.

And perhaps more important still – the shipment marks the start of many more that are expected to take place over the next 12 to 24 months, as the manufacturer delivers at least 145 V112-3.0MW units to expectant developers.

Little wonder then, that senior Vestas executives were in high spirits when it came to trumpeting the news.

And well they might. For the units have been a long while in the making and have been incubated during a torrid time for the European manufacturer.

Indeed, with earlier development costs having over run to the tune of €125 million and with the business having cycled through a number of senior offshore personnel in relatively quick succession, the past few years have seen Vestas conspicuously absent from the offshore wind energy space.

And all this while Siemens has steamed ahead; developing close working relationships with developers and the utilities, building out the footprint of its existing fleet and most recently, having successfully deployed two 6MW demonstration turbines to Gunfleet Sands.

A chance then, for Vestas to start shuffling the pack. And with further offshore momentum already being demonstrated by the Chinese, it’s well timed, too.

For, only last week, Ming Yang unveiled a 6.5MW super compact drive (SCD) machine that will be installed and tested over the next three months and that pushes engineering design further, all over again.

Sure, the Chinese turbine might be all-too quickly dismissed by many European developers – particularly with its two bladed design – however, the anticipated price alone will ensure that at least some will want to take a second look.

Of course, the irony that Ming Yang was once touted as a potential suitor to Vestas during its share price lows won’t be lost on the manufacturing community, here. And Vestas’ renewed manufacturer vigour is intended to draw a line under the previous takeover talk.

Irrespective, for Vestas the battle lines have once again been drawn. And the latest developments are undoubtedly intended to re-establish its commitment to working on wind initiatives in the water.

Setting aside the manufacturer’s retreat from establishing a new facility in Sheerness, Kent, early-stage planning for the 8MW offshore behemoth continues and the sales team are already calculating the commissions.

As the wider market keeps a close eye on cutting costs, let’s hope for everyone’s sake that the increased competition that this new kit facilitates brings about wider market benefits, over and above the need to hit individual sales goals.

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Become a member of the 6,500-strong A Word About Wind community today, and gain access to our premium content, exclusive lead generation and investment opportunities.