Musk grabs headlines with Aussie wind-and-storage

“Tesla will get the system installed and working 100 days from contract signature or it is free. That serious enough for you?”

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A Word About Wind
July 10, 2017
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Musk grabs headlines with Aussie wind-and-storage

“Tesla will get the system installed and working 100 days from contract signature or it is free. That serious enough for you?”

This is how, in March, the billionaire co-founder of electric car giant Tesla, Elon Musk, promised on Twitter to build an electricity storage system that would help to prevent blackouts in the Australian state of South Australia.

And four months later, he’s set to maintain his promise.

Late last week Tesla won the rights to build a 100MW (129MWh) lithium-ion battery storage facility, which is to be paired with Neoen’s 309MW Hornsdale wind farm in South Australia. The project is set to be up and running within 100 working days of the contract being signed or it will be for free. It is understandable that Musk’s promise has drawn most attention.

But, for us, the biggest news is seeing Musk turning again his attention to wind after a period where it looked like he would focus almost exclusively on solar.

In 2015, Musk unveiled the Tesla Powerpack, a storage system intended to help businesses and public utility companies to manage intermittent production from wind and solar. The system comes in 100kWh battery blocks that can scale from 500kWH up to 10MWh.

After that, he opted to concentrate his attention on solar energy. In 2016, Musk announced that Tesla had acquired one of his other firms, solar power company SolarCity, for $2bn to merge Tesla’s home battery storage system Powerwall and electric cars with SolarCity’s solar panels. It made sense to match the technology where there are obvious synergies.

However, this deal in South Australia suggests that Musk could yet be a major figure in the development of storage systems for wind farms. That is not to say that he is alone in doing so. Far from it. A recent example of this is Spain's Acciona completing a hybrid scheme that combines a battery storage system with a grid-connected wind farm, and plenty of other utilities and manufacturers are looking too.

The wind sector should benefit from having someone with Musk’s ambition and financial clout looking at this challenge. At Hornsdale, he could help to deliver a high-profile turning point for wind-and-storage that the industry has been long waiting for – and, if successful, his ability to grab a headline will ensure that everybody knows about this.

Of course, if this high-profile project does not succeed then everyone will know about that too, and the current positive PR will quickly turn sour. There is a lot riding on Musk’s pledge!

“Tesla will get the system installed and working 100 days from contract signature or it is free. That serious enough for you?”

This is how, in March, the billionaire co-founder of electric car giant Tesla, Elon Musk, promised on Twitter to build an electricity storage system that would help to prevent blackouts in the Australian state of South Australia.

And four months later, he’s set to maintain his promise.

Late last week Tesla won the rights to build a 100MW (129MWh) lithium-ion battery storage facility, which is to be paired with Neoen’s 309MW Hornsdale wind farm in South Australia. The project is set to be up and running within 100 working days of the contract being signed or it will be for free. It is understandable that Musk’s promise has drawn most attention.

But, for us, the biggest news is seeing Musk turning again his attention to wind after a period where it looked like he would focus almost exclusively on solar.

In 2015, Musk unveiled the Tesla Powerpack, a storage system intended to help businesses and public utility companies to manage intermittent production from wind and solar. The system comes in 100kWh battery blocks that can scale from 500kWH up to 10MWh.

After that, he opted to concentrate his attention on solar energy. In 2016, Musk announced that Tesla had acquired one of his other firms, solar power company SolarCity, for $2bn to merge Tesla’s home battery storage system Powerwall and electric cars with SolarCity’s solar panels. It made sense to match the technology where there are obvious synergies.

However, this deal in South Australia suggests that Musk could yet be a major figure in the development of storage systems for wind farms. That is not to say that he is alone in doing so. Far from it. A recent example of this is Spain's Acciona completing a hybrid scheme that combines a battery storage system with a grid-connected wind farm, and plenty of other utilities and manufacturers are looking too.

The wind sector should benefit from having someone with Musk’s ambition and financial clout looking at this challenge. At Hornsdale, he could help to deliver a high-profile turning point for wind-and-storage that the industry has been long waiting for – and, if successful, his ability to grab a headline will ensure that everybody knows about this.

Of course, if this high-profile project does not succeed then everyone will know about that too, and the current positive PR will quickly turn sour. There is a lot riding on Musk’s pledge!

“Tesla will get the system installed and working 100 days from contract signature or it is free. That serious enough for you?”

This is how, in March, the billionaire co-founder of electric car giant Tesla, Elon Musk, promised on Twitter to build an electricity storage system that would help to prevent blackouts in the Australian state of South Australia.

And four months later, he’s set to maintain his promise.

Late last week Tesla won the rights to build a 100MW (129MWh) lithium-ion battery storage facility, which is to be paired with Neoen’s 309MW Hornsdale wind farm in South Australia. The project is set to be up and running within 100 working days of the contract being signed or it will be for free. It is understandable that Musk’s promise has drawn most attention.

But, for us, the biggest news is seeing Musk turning again his attention to wind after a period where it looked like he would focus almost exclusively on solar.

In 2015, Musk unveiled the Tesla Powerpack, a storage system intended to help businesses and public utility companies to manage intermittent production from wind and solar. The system comes in 100kWh battery blocks that can scale from 500kWH up to 10MWh.

After that, he opted to concentrate his attention on solar energy. In 2016, Musk announced that Tesla had acquired one of his other firms, solar power company SolarCity, for $2bn to merge Tesla’s home battery storage system Powerwall and electric cars with SolarCity’s solar panels. It made sense to match the technology where there are obvious synergies.

However, this deal in South Australia suggests that Musk could yet be a major figure in the development of storage systems for wind farms. That is not to say that he is alone in doing so. Far from it. A recent example of this is Spain's Acciona completing a hybrid scheme that combines a battery storage system with a grid-connected wind farm, and plenty of other utilities and manufacturers are looking too.

The wind sector should benefit from having someone with Musk’s ambition and financial clout looking at this challenge. At Hornsdale, he could help to deliver a high-profile turning point for wind-and-storage that the industry has been long waiting for – and, if successful, his ability to grab a headline will ensure that everybody knows about this.

Of course, if this high-profile project does not succeed then everyone will know about that too, and the current positive PR will quickly turn sour. There is a lot riding on Musk’s pledge!

“Tesla will get the system installed and working 100 days from contract signature or it is free. That serious enough for you?”

This is how, in March, the billionaire co-founder of electric car giant Tesla, Elon Musk, promised on Twitter to build an electricity storage system that would help to prevent blackouts in the Australian state of South Australia.

And four months later, he’s set to maintain his promise.

Late last week Tesla won the rights to build a 100MW (129MWh) lithium-ion battery storage facility, which is to be paired with Neoen’s 309MW Hornsdale wind farm in South Australia. The project is set to be up and running within 100 working days of the contract being signed or it will be for free. It is understandable that Musk’s promise has drawn most attention.

But, for us, the biggest news is seeing Musk turning again his attention to wind after a period where it looked like he would focus almost exclusively on solar.

In 2015, Musk unveiled the Tesla Powerpack, a storage system intended to help businesses and public utility companies to manage intermittent production from wind and solar. The system comes in 100kWh battery blocks that can scale from 500kWH up to 10MWh.

After that, he opted to concentrate his attention on solar energy. In 2016, Musk announced that Tesla had acquired one of his other firms, solar power company SolarCity, for $2bn to merge Tesla’s home battery storage system Powerwall and electric cars with SolarCity’s solar panels. It made sense to match the technology where there are obvious synergies.

However, this deal in South Australia suggests that Musk could yet be a major figure in the development of storage systems for wind farms. That is not to say that he is alone in doing so. Far from it. A recent example of this is Spain's Acciona completing a hybrid scheme that combines a battery storage system with a grid-connected wind farm, and plenty of other utilities and manufacturers are looking too.

The wind sector should benefit from having someone with Musk’s ambition and financial clout looking at this challenge. At Hornsdale, he could help to deliver a high-profile turning point for wind-and-storage that the industry has been long waiting for – and, if successful, his ability to grab a headline will ensure that everybody knows about this.

Of course, if this high-profile project does not succeed then everyone will know about that too, and the current positive PR will quickly turn sour. There is a lot riding on Musk’s pledge!

“Tesla will get the system installed and working 100 days from contract signature or it is free. That serious enough for you?”

This is how, in March, the billionaire co-founder of electric car giant Tesla, Elon Musk, promised on Twitter to build an electricity storage system that would help to prevent blackouts in the Australian state of South Australia.

And four months later, he’s set to maintain his promise.

Late last week Tesla won the rights to build a 100MW (129MWh) lithium-ion battery storage facility, which is to be paired with Neoen’s 309MW Hornsdale wind farm in South Australia. The project is set to be up and running within 100 working days of the contract being signed or it will be for free. It is understandable that Musk’s promise has drawn most attention.

But, for us, the biggest news is seeing Musk turning again his attention to wind after a period where it looked like he would focus almost exclusively on solar.

In 2015, Musk unveiled the Tesla Powerpack, a storage system intended to help businesses and public utility companies to manage intermittent production from wind and solar. The system comes in 100kWh battery blocks that can scale from 500kWH up to 10MWh.

After that, he opted to concentrate his attention on solar energy. In 2016, Musk announced that Tesla had acquired one of his other firms, solar power company SolarCity, for $2bn to merge Tesla’s home battery storage system Powerwall and electric cars with SolarCity’s solar panels. It made sense to match the technology where there are obvious synergies.

However, this deal in South Australia suggests that Musk could yet be a major figure in the development of storage systems for wind farms. That is not to say that he is alone in doing so. Far from it. A recent example of this is Spain's Acciona completing a hybrid scheme that combines a battery storage system with a grid-connected wind farm, and plenty of other utilities and manufacturers are looking too.

The wind sector should benefit from having someone with Musk’s ambition and financial clout looking at this challenge. At Hornsdale, he could help to deliver a high-profile turning point for wind-and-storage that the industry has been long waiting for – and, if successful, his ability to grab a headline will ensure that everybody knows about this.

Of course, if this high-profile project does not succeed then everyone will know about that too, and the current positive PR will quickly turn sour. There is a lot riding on Musk’s pledge!

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Become a member of the 6,500-strong A Word About Wind community today, and gain access to our premium content, exclusive lead generation and investment opportunities.