MHI Vestas vs. Siemens Gamesa — the simulator showdown

We all know MHI Vestas and Siemens Gamesa are locked in a race to deliver the biggest and best offshore turbines — but who has the best offshore wind simulator? This is one of our big questions at this week’s Offshore Wind Energy 2017 conference in London, so we decided to try them both.

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A Word About Wind
June 6, 2017
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This content is from our archive. Some formatting or links may be broken.
MHI Vestas vs. Siemens Gamesa — the simulator showdown

We all know MHI Vestas and Siemens Gamesa are locked in a race to deliver the biggest and best offshore turbines — but who has the best offshore wind simulator? This is one of our big questions at this week’s Offshore Wind Energy 2017 conference in London, so we decided to try them both.

The MHI Vestas simulator and its red gantry has been an ubiquitous feature of recent events where we have seen the company exhibiting. We have not found time for it before, so there was an extra buzz as we put on the white safety vest, attached ourselves to the gantry and put on the VR headset.

It started confusingly as I was at first addressed by a young guy behind us and, at that point, my desire to not turn around in case I looked like a complete idiot was just too strong. When I did look at him, he was like a boring non-playable character from a video game — and with graphics that wouldn’t pass muster on my PS4. He didn’t even explain what special abilities I’ve got. Amateur!

But the content itself was interesting. Getting to see inside the nacelle and experience the realistic Liverpool Bay rain has increased my respect for the remoteness of the physically tough work that is undertaken by those tasked with maintaining these huge machines. Frankly, it also made me feel a bit ashamed that I needed to loosen the safety belt to squeeze into it before starting.

For the final scene I was among a forest of offshore turbine towers, and that’s when I really wanted the video game to kick in: “Wait! There are bad guys behind that tower. I need to take them out!” So great was my immersion that I managed to walk off with the white vest to listen to MHI Vestas launch its new 9.5MW turbine — and enjoy a glass of the complimentary Champagne, of course.

And then I headed straight to Siemens Gamesa, which had its sit-down simulator of offshore wind maintenance. I put on my VR headset and it hooked me immediately as Mr. Cool-Guy McAmerican — that’s probably his name — led me to a helicopter and flew me out to an maintenance vessel.

As we took a flythrough of the scheme, the weather was far better than the MHI Vestas simulator. I also saw a workboat at the base of one of the turbines with what I swear was my digital self in the MHI Vestas simulator. Unfortunately, Mr. McAmerican also hadn’t told me about my special abilities or weapons so I couldn’t take myself out with a virtual rocket launcher. Shame.

So which was better? I’d say MHI Vestas edged it. It’s always useful to get a sense of the scale of these machines ‘up close’, but they both taught me something important: if anyone makes a video game where I can fight around an offshore wind farm, I’ll be front of the queue — or probably the only one in the queue.

We all know MHI Vestas and Siemens Gamesa are locked in a race to deliver the biggest and best offshore turbines — but who has the best offshore wind simulator? This is one of our big questions at this week’s Offshore Wind Energy 2017 conference in London, so we decided to try them both.

The MHI Vestas simulator and its red gantry has been an ubiquitous feature of recent events where we have seen the company exhibiting. We have not found time for it before, so there was an extra buzz as we put on the white safety vest, attached ourselves to the gantry and put on the VR headset.

It started confusingly as I was at first addressed by a young guy behind us and, at that point, my desire to not turn around in case I looked like a complete idiot was just too strong. When I did look at him, he was like a boring non-playable character from a video game — and with graphics that wouldn’t pass muster on my PS4. He didn’t even explain what special abilities I’ve got. Amateur!

But the content itself was interesting. Getting to see inside the nacelle and experience the realistic Liverpool Bay rain has increased my respect for the remoteness of the physically tough work that is undertaken by those tasked with maintaining these huge machines. Frankly, it also made me feel a bit ashamed that I needed to loosen the safety belt to squeeze into it before starting.

For the final scene I was among a forest of offshore turbine towers, and that’s when I really wanted the video game to kick in: “Wait! There are bad guys behind that tower. I need to take them out!” So great was my immersion that I managed to walk off with the white vest to listen to MHI Vestas launch its new 9.5MW turbine — and enjoy a glass of the complimentary Champagne, of course.

And then I headed straight to Siemens Gamesa, which had its sit-down simulator of offshore wind maintenance. I put on my VR headset and it hooked me immediately as Mr. Cool-Guy McAmerican — that’s probably his name — led me to a helicopter and flew me out to an maintenance vessel.

As we took a flythrough of the scheme, the weather was far better than the MHI Vestas simulator. I also saw a workboat at the base of one of the turbines with what I swear was my digital self in the MHI Vestas simulator. Unfortunately, Mr. McAmerican also hadn’t told me about my special abilities or weapons so I couldn’t take myself out with a virtual rocket launcher. Shame.

So which was better? I’d say MHI Vestas edged it. It’s always useful to get a sense of the scale of these machines ‘up close’, but they both taught me something important: if anyone makes a video game where I can fight around an offshore wind farm, I’ll be front of the queue — or probably the only one in the queue.

We all know MHI Vestas and Siemens Gamesa are locked in a race to deliver the biggest and best offshore turbines — but who has the best offshore wind simulator? This is one of our big questions at this week’s Offshore Wind Energy 2017 conference in London, so we decided to try them both.

The MHI Vestas simulator and its red gantry has been an ubiquitous feature of recent events where we have seen the company exhibiting. We have not found time for it before, so there was an extra buzz as we put on the white safety vest, attached ourselves to the gantry and put on the VR headset.

It started confusingly as I was at first addressed by a young guy behind us and, at that point, my desire to not turn around in case I looked like a complete idiot was just too strong. When I did look at him, he was like a boring non-playable character from a video game — and with graphics that wouldn’t pass muster on my PS4. He didn’t even explain what special abilities I’ve got. Amateur!

But the content itself was interesting. Getting to see inside the nacelle and experience the realistic Liverpool Bay rain has increased my respect for the remoteness of the physically tough work that is undertaken by those tasked with maintaining these huge machines. Frankly, it also made me feel a bit ashamed that I needed to loosen the safety belt to squeeze into it before starting.

For the final scene I was among a forest of offshore turbine towers, and that’s when I really wanted the video game to kick in: “Wait! There are bad guys behind that tower. I need to take them out!” So great was my immersion that I managed to walk off with the white vest to listen to MHI Vestas launch its new 9.5MW turbine — and enjoy a glass of the complimentary Champagne, of course.

And then I headed straight to Siemens Gamesa, which had its sit-down simulator of offshore wind maintenance. I put on my VR headset and it hooked me immediately as Mr. Cool-Guy McAmerican — that’s probably his name — led me to a helicopter and flew me out to an maintenance vessel.

As we took a flythrough of the scheme, the weather was far better than the MHI Vestas simulator. I also saw a workboat at the base of one of the turbines with what I swear was my digital self in the MHI Vestas simulator. Unfortunately, Mr. McAmerican also hadn’t told me about my special abilities or weapons so I couldn’t take myself out with a virtual rocket launcher. Shame.

So which was better? I’d say MHI Vestas edged it. It’s always useful to get a sense of the scale of these machines ‘up close’, but they both taught me something important: if anyone makes a video game where I can fight around an offshore wind farm, I’ll be front of the queue — or probably the only one in the queue.

We all know MHI Vestas and Siemens Gamesa are locked in a race to deliver the biggest and best offshore turbines — but who has the best offshore wind simulator? This is one of our big questions at this week’s Offshore Wind Energy 2017 conference in London, so we decided to try them both.

The MHI Vestas simulator and its red gantry has been an ubiquitous feature of recent events where we have seen the company exhibiting. We have not found time for it before, so there was an extra buzz as we put on the white safety vest, attached ourselves to the gantry and put on the VR headset.

It started confusingly as I was at first addressed by a young guy behind us and, at that point, my desire to not turn around in case I looked like a complete idiot was just too strong. When I did look at him, he was like a boring non-playable character from a video game — and with graphics that wouldn’t pass muster on my PS4. He didn’t even explain what special abilities I’ve got. Amateur!

But the content itself was interesting. Getting to see inside the nacelle and experience the realistic Liverpool Bay rain has increased my respect for the remoteness of the physically tough work that is undertaken by those tasked with maintaining these huge machines. Frankly, it also made me feel a bit ashamed that I needed to loosen the safety belt to squeeze into it before starting.

For the final scene I was among a forest of offshore turbine towers, and that’s when I really wanted the video game to kick in: “Wait! There are bad guys behind that tower. I need to take them out!” So great was my immersion that I managed to walk off with the white vest to listen to MHI Vestas launch its new 9.5MW turbine — and enjoy a glass of the complimentary Champagne, of course.

And then I headed straight to Siemens Gamesa, which had its sit-down simulator of offshore wind maintenance. I put on my VR headset and it hooked me immediately as Mr. Cool-Guy McAmerican — that’s probably his name — led me to a helicopter and flew me out to an maintenance vessel.

As we took a flythrough of the scheme, the weather was far better than the MHI Vestas simulator. I also saw a workboat at the base of one of the turbines with what I swear was my digital self in the MHI Vestas simulator. Unfortunately, Mr. McAmerican also hadn’t told me about my special abilities or weapons so I couldn’t take myself out with a virtual rocket launcher. Shame.

So which was better? I’d say MHI Vestas edged it. It’s always useful to get a sense of the scale of these machines ‘up close’, but they both taught me something important: if anyone makes a video game where I can fight around an offshore wind farm, I’ll be front of the queue — or probably the only one in the queue.

We all know MHI Vestas and Siemens Gamesa are locked in a race to deliver the biggest and best offshore turbines — but who has the best offshore wind simulator? This is one of our big questions at this week’s Offshore Wind Energy 2017 conference in London, so we decided to try them both.

The MHI Vestas simulator and its red gantry has been an ubiquitous feature of recent events where we have seen the company exhibiting. We have not found time for it before, so there was an extra buzz as we put on the white safety vest, attached ourselves to the gantry and put on the VR headset.

It started confusingly as I was at first addressed by a young guy behind us and, at that point, my desire to not turn around in case I looked like a complete idiot was just too strong. When I did look at him, he was like a boring non-playable character from a video game — and with graphics that wouldn’t pass muster on my PS4. He didn’t even explain what special abilities I’ve got. Amateur!

But the content itself was interesting. Getting to see inside the nacelle and experience the realistic Liverpool Bay rain has increased my respect for the remoteness of the physically tough work that is undertaken by those tasked with maintaining these huge machines. Frankly, it also made me feel a bit ashamed that I needed to loosen the safety belt to squeeze into it before starting.

For the final scene I was among a forest of offshore turbine towers, and that’s when I really wanted the video game to kick in: “Wait! There are bad guys behind that tower. I need to take them out!” So great was my immersion that I managed to walk off with the white vest to listen to MHI Vestas launch its new 9.5MW turbine — and enjoy a glass of the complimentary Champagne, of course.

And then I headed straight to Siemens Gamesa, which had its sit-down simulator of offshore wind maintenance. I put on my VR headset and it hooked me immediately as Mr. Cool-Guy McAmerican — that’s probably his name — led me to a helicopter and flew me out to an maintenance vessel.

As we took a flythrough of the scheme, the weather was far better than the MHI Vestas simulator. I also saw a workboat at the base of one of the turbines with what I swear was my digital self in the MHI Vestas simulator. Unfortunately, Mr. McAmerican also hadn’t told me about my special abilities or weapons so I couldn’t take myself out with a virtual rocket launcher. Shame.

So which was better? I’d say MHI Vestas edged it. It’s always useful to get a sense of the scale of these machines ‘up close’, but they both taught me something important: if anyone makes a video game where I can fight around an offshore wind farm, I’ll be front of the queue — or probably the only one in the queue.

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Not a member yet?

Become a member of the 6,500-strong A Word About Wind community today, and gain access to our premium content, exclusive lead generation and investment opportunities.