Legal Power List: Lawyers key to investment flows

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Richard Heap
June 6, 2016
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This content is from our archive. Some formatting or links may be broken.
Legal Power List: Lawyers key to investment flows

Tomorrow, we are due to publish our Legal Power List, which profiles the 100 most influential lawyers in the global wind sector. This is a spin-off from our main Top 100 Power People, which we publish in November, and has been months in the making.

We have explained elsewhere why we have chosen to focus on lawyers so will not do that again here. Instead, we will look at an unrelated piece of research that came out in the last week and shows the investment flows in the renewable energy sector over the last year. In this, we see the crucial role that lawyers play in keeping deals moving in the wind sector.

This research is the ‘Renewables 2016: Global Status Report’published last week by the renewables non-profit REN21, which gives a wide-ranging view on the state of wind and other types of clean energy. This reports that global investment in renewables was $286bn in 2015, which is up 5% year-on-year and beat the previous record of $279bn in 2011.

This 2015 figure is also very revealing because it shows that, for the first time, investment in renewables in developing countries outstripped investment in developed nations. Of that $286bn, there was $130bn invested in renewables in developed countries and $156bn in developing nations including China, India and Brazil. This is a significant shift.

And, for wind specifically, we saw $109bn invested in utility-scale projects worldwide, of which $42bn was in developed countries and $67bn was in developing nations.

These will keep changing. So far this year, for example, we have seen a wind investment slowdown in China, but a rise in activity in Europe, North America and some markets in Asia. Lawyers play a key role in helping firms keep a stable footing as these sands shift.

And the changes are not just between different global regions. There are also shifts in the ways that deals are being funded. Asset finance of utility-scale developments accounts for the vast majority of investment going into renewables, and most of that is in the form of non-recourse loans, bonds or leasing at project level; or borrowing at corporate level.

However, the report also shows that bonds are increasingly being used as an alternative to conventional bank project finance, with $48bn coming from this source in 2015, which is a 28% rise year-on-year. In addition, it covers the fact that institutional investors have been setting up platforms to buy equity in renewable projects. These are similar to unquoted funds, but the manager is an investment bank that is investing its own capital in schemes.

This shows many things, and one is the importance of lawyers.

We keep seeing new ways that different types of investors want to invest in the sector, and it is up to the lawyers to respond to that by helping to protect these investors and reduce their risks.

The legal profession is not the only reason why we have just seen a record year for investing in renewables, but lawyers working in the background have played a key role. They help investors to manage their risks so that they can invest money where they want.

This could be in a new country with a developing legal system, or it could be in a major country where systems are more established. But either way, in any of these markets, we see lawyers playing the same basic role. Solving problems and making deals happen.

It is these top problem-solvers and deal-enablers that we will recognise tomorrow in the Legal Power List.

Tomorrow, we are due to publish our Legal Power List, which profiles the 100 most influential lawyers in the global wind sector. This is a spin-off from our main Top 100 Power People, which we publish in November, and has been months in the making.

We have explained elsewhere why we have chosen to focus on lawyers so will not do that again here. Instead, we will look at an unrelated piece of research that came out in the last week and shows the investment flows in the renewable energy sector over the last year. In this, we see the crucial role that lawyers play in keeping deals moving in the wind sector.

This research is the ‘Renewables 2016: Global Status Report’published last week by the renewables non-profit REN21, which gives a wide-ranging view on the state of wind and other types of clean energy. This reports that global investment in renewables was $286bn in 2015, which is up 5% year-on-year and beat the previous record of $279bn in 2011.

This 2015 figure is also very revealing because it shows that, for the first time, investment in renewables in developing countries outstripped investment in developed nations. Of that $286bn, there was $130bn invested in renewables in developed countries and $156bn in developing nations including China, India and Brazil. This is a significant shift.

And, for wind specifically, we saw $109bn invested in utility-scale projects worldwide, of which $42bn was in developed countries and $67bn was in developing nations.

These will keep changing. So far this year, for example, we have seen a wind investment slowdown in China, but a rise in activity in Europe, North America and some markets in Asia. Lawyers play a key role in helping firms keep a stable footing as these sands shift.

And the changes are not just between different global regions. There are also shifts in the ways that deals are being funded. Asset finance of utility-scale developments accounts for the vast majority of investment going into renewables, and most of that is in the form of non-recourse loans, bonds or leasing at project level; or borrowing at corporate level.

However, the report also shows that bonds are increasingly being used as an alternative to conventional bank project finance, with $48bn coming from this source in 2015, which is a 28% rise year-on-year. In addition, it covers the fact that institutional investors have been setting up platforms to buy equity in renewable projects. These are similar to unquoted funds, but the manager is an investment bank that is investing its own capital in schemes.

This shows many things, and one is the importance of lawyers.

We keep seeing new ways that different types of investors want to invest in the sector, and it is up to the lawyers to respond to that by helping to protect these investors and reduce their risks.

The legal profession is not the only reason why we have just seen a record year for investing in renewables, but lawyers working in the background have played a key role. They help investors to manage their risks so that they can invest money where they want.

This could be in a new country with a developing legal system, or it could be in a major country where systems are more established. But either way, in any of these markets, we see lawyers playing the same basic role. Solving problems and making deals happen.

It is these top problem-solvers and deal-enablers that we will recognise tomorrow in the Legal Power List.

Tomorrow, we are due to publish our Legal Power List, which profiles the 100 most influential lawyers in the global wind sector. This is a spin-off from our main Top 100 Power People, which we publish in November, and has been months in the making.

We have explained elsewhere why we have chosen to focus on lawyers so will not do that again here. Instead, we will look at an unrelated piece of research that came out in the last week and shows the investment flows in the renewable energy sector over the last year. In this, we see the crucial role that lawyers play in keeping deals moving in the wind sector.

This research is the ‘Renewables 2016: Global Status Report’published last week by the renewables non-profit REN21, which gives a wide-ranging view on the state of wind and other types of clean energy. This reports that global investment in renewables was $286bn in 2015, which is up 5% year-on-year and beat the previous record of $279bn in 2011.

This 2015 figure is also very revealing because it shows that, for the first time, investment in renewables in developing countries outstripped investment in developed nations. Of that $286bn, there was $130bn invested in renewables in developed countries and $156bn in developing nations including China, India and Brazil. This is a significant shift.

And, for wind specifically, we saw $109bn invested in utility-scale projects worldwide, of which $42bn was in developed countries and $67bn was in developing nations.

These will keep changing. So far this year, for example, we have seen a wind investment slowdown in China, but a rise in activity in Europe, North America and some markets in Asia. Lawyers play a key role in helping firms keep a stable footing as these sands shift.

And the changes are not just between different global regions. There are also shifts in the ways that deals are being funded. Asset finance of utility-scale developments accounts for the vast majority of investment going into renewables, and most of that is in the form of non-recourse loans, bonds or leasing at project level; or borrowing at corporate level.

However, the report also shows that bonds are increasingly being used as an alternative to conventional bank project finance, with $48bn coming from this source in 2015, which is a 28% rise year-on-year. In addition, it covers the fact that institutional investors have been setting up platforms to buy equity in renewable projects. These are similar to unquoted funds, but the manager is an investment bank that is investing its own capital in schemes.

This shows many things, and one is the importance of lawyers.

We keep seeing new ways that different types of investors want to invest in the sector, and it is up to the lawyers to respond to that by helping to protect these investors and reduce their risks.

The legal profession is not the only reason why we have just seen a record year for investing in renewables, but lawyers working in the background have played a key role. They help investors to manage their risks so that they can invest money where they want.

This could be in a new country with a developing legal system, or it could be in a major country where systems are more established. But either way, in any of these markets, we see lawyers playing the same basic role. Solving problems and making deals happen.

It is these top problem-solvers and deal-enablers that we will recognise tomorrow in the Legal Power List.

Tomorrow, we are due to publish our Legal Power List, which profiles the 100 most influential lawyers in the global wind sector. This is a spin-off from our main Top 100 Power People, which we publish in November, and has been months in the making.

We have explained elsewhere why we have chosen to focus on lawyers so will not do that again here. Instead, we will look at an unrelated piece of research that came out in the last week and shows the investment flows in the renewable energy sector over the last year. In this, we see the crucial role that lawyers play in keeping deals moving in the wind sector.

This research is the ‘Renewables 2016: Global Status Report’published last week by the renewables non-profit REN21, which gives a wide-ranging view on the state of wind and other types of clean energy. This reports that global investment in renewables was $286bn in 2015, which is up 5% year-on-year and beat the previous record of $279bn in 2011.

This 2015 figure is also very revealing because it shows that, for the first time, investment in renewables in developing countries outstripped investment in developed nations. Of that $286bn, there was $130bn invested in renewables in developed countries and $156bn in developing nations including China, India and Brazil. This is a significant shift.

And, for wind specifically, we saw $109bn invested in utility-scale projects worldwide, of which $42bn was in developed countries and $67bn was in developing nations.

These will keep changing. So far this year, for example, we have seen a wind investment slowdown in China, but a rise in activity in Europe, North America and some markets in Asia. Lawyers play a key role in helping firms keep a stable footing as these sands shift.

And the changes are not just between different global regions. There are also shifts in the ways that deals are being funded. Asset finance of utility-scale developments accounts for the vast majority of investment going into renewables, and most of that is in the form of non-recourse loans, bonds or leasing at project level; or borrowing at corporate level.

However, the report also shows that bonds are increasingly being used as an alternative to conventional bank project finance, with $48bn coming from this source in 2015, which is a 28% rise year-on-year. In addition, it covers the fact that institutional investors have been setting up platforms to buy equity in renewable projects. These are similar to unquoted funds, but the manager is an investment bank that is investing its own capital in schemes.

This shows many things, and one is the importance of lawyers.

We keep seeing new ways that different types of investors want to invest in the sector, and it is up to the lawyers to respond to that by helping to protect these investors and reduce their risks.

The legal profession is not the only reason why we have just seen a record year for investing in renewables, but lawyers working in the background have played a key role. They help investors to manage their risks so that they can invest money where they want.

This could be in a new country with a developing legal system, or it could be in a major country where systems are more established. But either way, in any of these markets, we see lawyers playing the same basic role. Solving problems and making deals happen.

It is these top problem-solvers and deal-enablers that we will recognise tomorrow in the Legal Power List.

Tomorrow, we are due to publish our Legal Power List, which profiles the 100 most influential lawyers in the global wind sector. This is a spin-off from our main Top 100 Power People, which we publish in November, and has been months in the making.

We have explained elsewhere why we have chosen to focus on lawyers so will not do that again here. Instead, we will look at an unrelated piece of research that came out in the last week and shows the investment flows in the renewable energy sector over the last year. In this, we see the crucial role that lawyers play in keeping deals moving in the wind sector.

This research is the ‘Renewables 2016: Global Status Report’published last week by the renewables non-profit REN21, which gives a wide-ranging view on the state of wind and other types of clean energy. This reports that global investment in renewables was $286bn in 2015, which is up 5% year-on-year and beat the previous record of $279bn in 2011.

This 2015 figure is also very revealing because it shows that, for the first time, investment in renewables in developing countries outstripped investment in developed nations. Of that $286bn, there was $130bn invested in renewables in developed countries and $156bn in developing nations including China, India and Brazil. This is a significant shift.

And, for wind specifically, we saw $109bn invested in utility-scale projects worldwide, of which $42bn was in developed countries and $67bn was in developing nations.

These will keep changing. So far this year, for example, we have seen a wind investment slowdown in China, but a rise in activity in Europe, North America and some markets in Asia. Lawyers play a key role in helping firms keep a stable footing as these sands shift.

And the changes are not just between different global regions. There are also shifts in the ways that deals are being funded. Asset finance of utility-scale developments accounts for the vast majority of investment going into renewables, and most of that is in the form of non-recourse loans, bonds or leasing at project level; or borrowing at corporate level.

However, the report also shows that bonds are increasingly being used as an alternative to conventional bank project finance, with $48bn coming from this source in 2015, which is a 28% rise year-on-year. In addition, it covers the fact that institutional investors have been setting up platforms to buy equity in renewable projects. These are similar to unquoted funds, but the manager is an investment bank that is investing its own capital in schemes.

This shows many things, and one is the importance of lawyers.

We keep seeing new ways that different types of investors want to invest in the sector, and it is up to the lawyers to respond to that by helping to protect these investors and reduce their risks.

The legal profession is not the only reason why we have just seen a record year for investing in renewables, but lawyers working in the background have played a key role. They help investors to manage their risks so that they can invest money where they want.

This could be in a new country with a developing legal system, or it could be in a major country where systems are more established. But either way, in any of these markets, we see lawyers playing the same basic role. Solving problems and making deals happen.

It is these top problem-solvers and deal-enablers that we will recognise tomorrow in the Legal Power List.

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Full archive access is available to members only

Not a member yet?

Become a member of the 6,500-strong A Word About Wind community today, and gain access to our premium content, exclusive lead generation and investment opportunities.