Learning lessons

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Adam Barber
February 15, 2013
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This content is from our archive. Some formatting or links may be broken.
Learning lessons

There’s been plenty of talk of late about the need for the wind industry to start learning lessons from other major manufacturing markets.

And increasingly, the automotive industry has been referenced as the most obvious choice.

It’s all perfectly understandable, of course.

For, ever since Sir Henry Ford started to mass-produce the famous Model T, the automotive sector has continually refined the way in which its production, testing, shipping and delivery cycle works.

It’s an evolution that’s taken shape over one hundred years and in the process, it’s created some significant engineering efficiencies.

The Jaguar Land Rover facility in Halewood is a case in point – with over 4,000 staff employed at the site and with production of the Range Rover Evoque having recently switched to run 24 hours, in order to meet demand.

However, that’s not the only thing that this constant period of manufacturing and engineering refinement has produced.

It’s also created some titans of industry. Powerful individuals. People who have learnt the trade from the ground up and that, in many cases, now sit behind some of the world’s most aspirational brands.

And these individuals are interesting. Since many of them are now in the process of looking for a new challenge.

True, the international automotive sector still offers some significant room for growth – with the Asian market in particular continuing to churn out some impressive statistics. Indeed, China’s annual car production has exceeded that of the European Union, or that of both the USA and Japan combined, since 2009.

Similarly, it’s also true that the automotive market has some serious innovating to do – particularly if it is to meet the challenge of rising oil prices and the demands of the cost conscious global consumer.

So in this respect, the potential within the automotive sector remains clear.

It’s just that for many individuals, this market doesn’t always feel like the only place where future manufacturing and engineering potential really lies.

And as major turbine makers look to tackle the combined challenges of expanding their existing range – tackling issues such as low wind speeds, as well as introducing top end technology capable of generating multi megawatts – the parallels to be drawn are difficult to avoid..

Sure, it’s not always particularly sexy stuff.

Nevertheless, the ability to streamline production output, diversify the global manufacturing footprint and reduce the time between factory output and sale is key.

And it’s already starting to play an increasingly important role in safeguarding future manufacturer success. Diversifying the customer base and mitigating against future risk.

Individuals like Dr Felix Ferlemann, Chief Executive Officer of the wind power division of Siemens Energy, have already made the switch. In 2013 many more are surely set to follow.

There’s been plenty of talk of late about the need for the wind industry to start learning lessons from other major manufacturing markets.

And increasingly, the automotive industry has been referenced as the most obvious choice.

It’s all perfectly understandable, of course.

For, ever since Sir Henry Ford started to mass-produce the famous Model T, the automotive sector has continually refined the way in which its production, testing, shipping and delivery cycle works.

It’s an evolution that’s taken shape over one hundred years and in the process, it’s created some significant engineering efficiencies.

The Jaguar Land Rover facility in Halewood is a case in point – with over 4,000 staff employed at the site and with production of the Range Rover Evoque having recently switched to run 24 hours, in order to meet demand.

However, that’s not the only thing that this constant period of manufacturing and engineering refinement has produced.

It’s also created some titans of industry. Powerful individuals. People who have learnt the trade from the ground up and that, in many cases, now sit behind some of the world’s most aspirational brands.

And these individuals are interesting. Since many of them are now in the process of looking for a new challenge.

True, the international automotive sector still offers some significant room for growth – with the Asian market in particular continuing to churn out some impressive statistics. Indeed, China’s annual car production has exceeded that of the European Union, or that of both the USA and Japan combined, since 2009.

Similarly, it’s also true that the automotive market has some serious innovating to do – particularly if it is to meet the challenge of rising oil prices and the demands of the cost conscious global consumer.

So in this respect, the potential within the automotive sector remains clear.

It’s just that for many individuals, this market doesn’t always feel like the only place where future manufacturing and engineering potential really lies.

And as major turbine makers look to tackle the combined challenges of expanding their existing range – tackling issues such as low wind speeds, as well as introducing top end technology capable of generating multi megawatts – the parallels to be drawn are difficult to avoid..

Sure, it’s not always particularly sexy stuff.

Nevertheless, the ability to streamline production output, diversify the global manufacturing footprint and reduce the time between factory output and sale is key.

And it’s already starting to play an increasingly important role in safeguarding future manufacturer success. Diversifying the customer base and mitigating against future risk.

Individuals like Dr Felix Ferlemann, Chief Executive Officer of the wind power division of Siemens Energy, have already made the switch. In 2013 many more are surely set to follow.

There’s been plenty of talk of late about the need for the wind industry to start learning lessons from other major manufacturing markets.

And increasingly, the automotive industry has been referenced as the most obvious choice.

It’s all perfectly understandable, of course.

For, ever since Sir Henry Ford started to mass-produce the famous Model T, the automotive sector has continually refined the way in which its production, testing, shipping and delivery cycle works.

It’s an evolution that’s taken shape over one hundred years and in the process, it’s created some significant engineering efficiencies.

The Jaguar Land Rover facility in Halewood is a case in point – with over 4,000 staff employed at the site and with production of the Range Rover Evoque having recently switched to run 24 hours, in order to meet demand.

However, that’s not the only thing that this constant period of manufacturing and engineering refinement has produced.

It’s also created some titans of industry. Powerful individuals. People who have learnt the trade from the ground up and that, in many cases, now sit behind some of the world’s most aspirational brands.

And these individuals are interesting. Since many of them are now in the process of looking for a new challenge.

True, the international automotive sector still offers some significant room for growth – with the Asian market in particular continuing to churn out some impressive statistics. Indeed, China’s annual car production has exceeded that of the European Union, or that of both the USA and Japan combined, since 2009.

Similarly, it’s also true that the automotive market has some serious innovating to do – particularly if it is to meet the challenge of rising oil prices and the demands of the cost conscious global consumer.

So in this respect, the potential within the automotive sector remains clear.

It’s just that for many individuals, this market doesn’t always feel like the only place where future manufacturing and engineering potential really lies.

And as major turbine makers look to tackle the combined challenges of expanding their existing range – tackling issues such as low wind speeds, as well as introducing top end technology capable of generating multi megawatts – the parallels to be drawn are difficult to avoid..

Sure, it’s not always particularly sexy stuff.

Nevertheless, the ability to streamline production output, diversify the global manufacturing footprint and reduce the time between factory output and sale is key.

And it’s already starting to play an increasingly important role in safeguarding future manufacturer success. Diversifying the customer base and mitigating against future risk.

Individuals like Dr Felix Ferlemann, Chief Executive Officer of the wind power division of Siemens Energy, have already made the switch. In 2013 many more are surely set to follow.

There’s been plenty of talk of late about the need for the wind industry to start learning lessons from other major manufacturing markets.

And increasingly, the automotive industry has been referenced as the most obvious choice.

It’s all perfectly understandable, of course.

For, ever since Sir Henry Ford started to mass-produce the famous Model T, the automotive sector has continually refined the way in which its production, testing, shipping and delivery cycle works.

It’s an evolution that’s taken shape over one hundred years and in the process, it’s created some significant engineering efficiencies.

The Jaguar Land Rover facility in Halewood is a case in point – with over 4,000 staff employed at the site and with production of the Range Rover Evoque having recently switched to run 24 hours, in order to meet demand.

However, that’s not the only thing that this constant period of manufacturing and engineering refinement has produced.

It’s also created some titans of industry. Powerful individuals. People who have learnt the trade from the ground up and that, in many cases, now sit behind some of the world’s most aspirational brands.

And these individuals are interesting. Since many of them are now in the process of looking for a new challenge.

True, the international automotive sector still offers some significant room for growth – with the Asian market in particular continuing to churn out some impressive statistics. Indeed, China’s annual car production has exceeded that of the European Union, or that of both the USA and Japan combined, since 2009.

Similarly, it’s also true that the automotive market has some serious innovating to do – particularly if it is to meet the challenge of rising oil prices and the demands of the cost conscious global consumer.

So in this respect, the potential within the automotive sector remains clear.

It’s just that for many individuals, this market doesn’t always feel like the only place where future manufacturing and engineering potential really lies.

And as major turbine makers look to tackle the combined challenges of expanding their existing range – tackling issues such as low wind speeds, as well as introducing top end technology capable of generating multi megawatts – the parallels to be drawn are difficult to avoid..

Sure, it’s not always particularly sexy stuff.

Nevertheless, the ability to streamline production output, diversify the global manufacturing footprint and reduce the time between factory output and sale is key.

And it’s already starting to play an increasingly important role in safeguarding future manufacturer success. Diversifying the customer base and mitigating against future risk.

Individuals like Dr Felix Ferlemann, Chief Executive Officer of the wind power division of Siemens Energy, have already made the switch. In 2013 many more are surely set to follow.

There’s been plenty of talk of late about the need for the wind industry to start learning lessons from other major manufacturing markets.

And increasingly, the automotive industry has been referenced as the most obvious choice.

It’s all perfectly understandable, of course.

For, ever since Sir Henry Ford started to mass-produce the famous Model T, the automotive sector has continually refined the way in which its production, testing, shipping and delivery cycle works.

It’s an evolution that’s taken shape over one hundred years and in the process, it’s created some significant engineering efficiencies.

The Jaguar Land Rover facility in Halewood is a case in point – with over 4,000 staff employed at the site and with production of the Range Rover Evoque having recently switched to run 24 hours, in order to meet demand.

However, that’s not the only thing that this constant period of manufacturing and engineering refinement has produced.

It’s also created some titans of industry. Powerful individuals. People who have learnt the trade from the ground up and that, in many cases, now sit behind some of the world’s most aspirational brands.

And these individuals are interesting. Since many of them are now in the process of looking for a new challenge.

True, the international automotive sector still offers some significant room for growth – with the Asian market in particular continuing to churn out some impressive statistics. Indeed, China’s annual car production has exceeded that of the European Union, or that of both the USA and Japan combined, since 2009.

Similarly, it’s also true that the automotive market has some serious innovating to do – particularly if it is to meet the challenge of rising oil prices and the demands of the cost conscious global consumer.

So in this respect, the potential within the automotive sector remains clear.

It’s just that for many individuals, this market doesn’t always feel like the only place where future manufacturing and engineering potential really lies.

And as major turbine makers look to tackle the combined challenges of expanding their existing range – tackling issues such as low wind speeds, as well as introducing top end technology capable of generating multi megawatts – the parallels to be drawn are difficult to avoid..

Sure, it’s not always particularly sexy stuff.

Nevertheless, the ability to streamline production output, diversify the global manufacturing footprint and reduce the time between factory output and sale is key.

And it’s already starting to play an increasingly important role in safeguarding future manufacturer success. Diversifying the customer base and mitigating against future risk.

Individuals like Dr Felix Ferlemann, Chief Executive Officer of the wind power division of Siemens Energy, have already made the switch. In 2013 many more are surely set to follow.

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Not a member yet?

Become a member of the 6,500-strong A Word About Wind community today, and gain access to our premium content, exclusive lead generation and investment opportunities.