Keeping the Industry in Good Health

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Adam Barber
August 13, 2012
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This content is from our archive. Some formatting or links may be broken.
Keeping the Industry in Good Health

In the aftermath of the Second World War, in a practice that became known as the cargo cult, Micronesian tribes would clear landing strips in the hope of attracting overflying aircraft that they believed would bring wealth and prosperity to their communities.

In a somewhat crude analogy, it was something that was bought to mind following recent UK Government announcements regarding wind energy supply chain and industrial policy.

No one is under any doubt of the potential and the possibilities that the market presents. And there’s certainly no shortage of opportunities to track down chase (and to pour money into), either.

Rather, it’s that complex issue of delivering against targets, promises and plans – while all the while ensuring that an operation turns a profit – that’s get’s people scratching heads.

In its most simplistic state, this is of course capitalism at its best. After all, the multitude of new market entrants that continue to flood the market demonstrate one the clearest indicators yet that the entrepreneurial spirit remains alive and well, despite the economic gloom.

However, as the market diversifies and as the wind energy sector in particular fights battles on multiple fronts, it’s sometimes too easy to be busy, for the sake of being busy. And being busy doesn’t always necessarily mean that what we’re doing is right.

It’s because of this that the most ambitious market movers won’t have given much time to yet another letter calling for greater clarity in the sector – judging instead that if the incentives aren’t already in place, then there are easier paths to follow.

Lobbying for an improvement in incentives certainly has its place and is vital if we are to keep the wind industry in good health. However, for the canny entrepreneur, that’s looking for early advantage, it’s an area where attention quickly starts to wane.

And that’s where the real danger lies. Because as the market diversifies and as the disconnect grows between those early pioneers and the wider industry and its supporting supply chain, there’s the very real possibility that the focus shifts from what the industry needs, to what people think the industry needs.

That’s why the news late last week that Narec, the UK’s national renewable energy centre, has completed construction on its new 100 metre blade testing facility is of interest.

The facility, that is part of an £80 million government investment on the Northumberland site, is the second of three structures to be completed at Blyth.

It’s a site that offers much potential. And provided it’s addressing the precise challenges that the manufacturers and the market face, then the deals will surely follow.

Unlike those Micronesian tribes, an investment of this nature means that Narec has had the opportunity and foresight to truly understand exactly what it’s getting involved in.

The landing strip has been cleared and the red carpet is being rolled out. In a year where the UK has a laser focus on infrastructure legacy and longevity, let’s hope that the team at Narec truly understand who’ll be setting foot on the tarmac.

In the aftermath of the Second World War, in a practice that became known as the cargo cult, Micronesian tribes would clear landing strips in the hope of attracting overflying aircraft that they believed would bring wealth and prosperity to their communities.

In a somewhat crude analogy, it was something that was bought to mind following recent UK Government announcements regarding wind energy supply chain and industrial policy.

No one is under any doubt of the potential and the possibilities that the market presents. And there’s certainly no shortage of opportunities to track down chase (and to pour money into), either.

Rather, it’s that complex issue of delivering against targets, promises and plans – while all the while ensuring that an operation turns a profit – that’s get’s people scratching heads.

In its most simplistic state, this is of course capitalism at its best. After all, the multitude of new market entrants that continue to flood the market demonstrate one the clearest indicators yet that the entrepreneurial spirit remains alive and well, despite the economic gloom.

However, as the market diversifies and as the wind energy sector in particular fights battles on multiple fronts, it’s sometimes too easy to be busy, for the sake of being busy. And being busy doesn’t always necessarily mean that what we’re doing is right.

It’s because of this that the most ambitious market movers won’t have given much time to yet another letter calling for greater clarity in the sector – judging instead that if the incentives aren’t already in place, then there are easier paths to follow.

Lobbying for an improvement in incentives certainly has its place and is vital if we are to keep the wind industry in good health. However, for the canny entrepreneur, that’s looking for early advantage, it’s an area where attention quickly starts to wane.

And that’s where the real danger lies. Because as the market diversifies and as the disconnect grows between those early pioneers and the wider industry and its supporting supply chain, there’s the very real possibility that the focus shifts from what the industry needs, to what people think the industry needs.

That’s why the news late last week that Narec, the UK’s national renewable energy centre, has completed construction on its new 100 metre blade testing facility is of interest.

The facility, that is part of an £80 million government investment on the Northumberland site, is the second of three structures to be completed at Blyth.

It’s a site that offers much potential. And provided it’s addressing the precise challenges that the manufacturers and the market face, then the deals will surely follow.

Unlike those Micronesian tribes, an investment of this nature means that Narec has had the opportunity and foresight to truly understand exactly what it’s getting involved in.

The landing strip has been cleared and the red carpet is being rolled out. In a year where the UK has a laser focus on infrastructure legacy and longevity, let’s hope that the team at Narec truly understand who’ll be setting foot on the tarmac.

In the aftermath of the Second World War, in a practice that became known as the cargo cult, Micronesian tribes would clear landing strips in the hope of attracting overflying aircraft that they believed would bring wealth and prosperity to their communities.

In a somewhat crude analogy, it was something that was bought to mind following recent UK Government announcements regarding wind energy supply chain and industrial policy.

No one is under any doubt of the potential and the possibilities that the market presents. And there’s certainly no shortage of opportunities to track down chase (and to pour money into), either.

Rather, it’s that complex issue of delivering against targets, promises and plans – while all the while ensuring that an operation turns a profit – that’s get’s people scratching heads.

In its most simplistic state, this is of course capitalism at its best. After all, the multitude of new market entrants that continue to flood the market demonstrate one the clearest indicators yet that the entrepreneurial spirit remains alive and well, despite the economic gloom.

However, as the market diversifies and as the wind energy sector in particular fights battles on multiple fronts, it’s sometimes too easy to be busy, for the sake of being busy. And being busy doesn’t always necessarily mean that what we’re doing is right.

It’s because of this that the most ambitious market movers won’t have given much time to yet another letter calling for greater clarity in the sector – judging instead that if the incentives aren’t already in place, then there are easier paths to follow.

Lobbying for an improvement in incentives certainly has its place and is vital if we are to keep the wind industry in good health. However, for the canny entrepreneur, that’s looking for early advantage, it’s an area where attention quickly starts to wane.

And that’s where the real danger lies. Because as the market diversifies and as the disconnect grows between those early pioneers and the wider industry and its supporting supply chain, there’s the very real possibility that the focus shifts from what the industry needs, to what people think the industry needs.

That’s why the news late last week that Narec, the UK’s national renewable energy centre, has completed construction on its new 100 metre blade testing facility is of interest.

The facility, that is part of an £80 million government investment on the Northumberland site, is the second of three structures to be completed at Blyth.

It’s a site that offers much potential. And provided it’s addressing the precise challenges that the manufacturers and the market face, then the deals will surely follow.

Unlike those Micronesian tribes, an investment of this nature means that Narec has had the opportunity and foresight to truly understand exactly what it’s getting involved in.

The landing strip has been cleared and the red carpet is being rolled out. In a year where the UK has a laser focus on infrastructure legacy and longevity, let’s hope that the team at Narec truly understand who’ll be setting foot on the tarmac.

In the aftermath of the Second World War, in a practice that became known as the cargo cult, Micronesian tribes would clear landing strips in the hope of attracting overflying aircraft that they believed would bring wealth and prosperity to their communities.

In a somewhat crude analogy, it was something that was bought to mind following recent UK Government announcements regarding wind energy supply chain and industrial policy.

No one is under any doubt of the potential and the possibilities that the market presents. And there’s certainly no shortage of opportunities to track down chase (and to pour money into), either.

Rather, it’s that complex issue of delivering against targets, promises and plans – while all the while ensuring that an operation turns a profit – that’s get’s people scratching heads.

In its most simplistic state, this is of course capitalism at its best. After all, the multitude of new market entrants that continue to flood the market demonstrate one the clearest indicators yet that the entrepreneurial spirit remains alive and well, despite the economic gloom.

However, as the market diversifies and as the wind energy sector in particular fights battles on multiple fronts, it’s sometimes too easy to be busy, for the sake of being busy. And being busy doesn’t always necessarily mean that what we’re doing is right.

It’s because of this that the most ambitious market movers won’t have given much time to yet another letter calling for greater clarity in the sector – judging instead that if the incentives aren’t already in place, then there are easier paths to follow.

Lobbying for an improvement in incentives certainly has its place and is vital if we are to keep the wind industry in good health. However, for the canny entrepreneur, that’s looking for early advantage, it’s an area where attention quickly starts to wane.

And that’s where the real danger lies. Because as the market diversifies and as the disconnect grows between those early pioneers and the wider industry and its supporting supply chain, there’s the very real possibility that the focus shifts from what the industry needs, to what people think the industry needs.

That’s why the news late last week that Narec, the UK’s national renewable energy centre, has completed construction on its new 100 metre blade testing facility is of interest.

The facility, that is part of an £80 million government investment on the Northumberland site, is the second of three structures to be completed at Blyth.

It’s a site that offers much potential. And provided it’s addressing the precise challenges that the manufacturers and the market face, then the deals will surely follow.

Unlike those Micronesian tribes, an investment of this nature means that Narec has had the opportunity and foresight to truly understand exactly what it’s getting involved in.

The landing strip has been cleared and the red carpet is being rolled out. In a year where the UK has a laser focus on infrastructure legacy and longevity, let’s hope that the team at Narec truly understand who’ll be setting foot on the tarmac.

In the aftermath of the Second World War, in a practice that became known as the cargo cult, Micronesian tribes would clear landing strips in the hope of attracting overflying aircraft that they believed would bring wealth and prosperity to their communities.

In a somewhat crude analogy, it was something that was bought to mind following recent UK Government announcements regarding wind energy supply chain and industrial policy.

No one is under any doubt of the potential and the possibilities that the market presents. And there’s certainly no shortage of opportunities to track down chase (and to pour money into), either.

Rather, it’s that complex issue of delivering against targets, promises and plans – while all the while ensuring that an operation turns a profit – that’s get’s people scratching heads.

In its most simplistic state, this is of course capitalism at its best. After all, the multitude of new market entrants that continue to flood the market demonstrate one the clearest indicators yet that the entrepreneurial spirit remains alive and well, despite the economic gloom.

However, as the market diversifies and as the wind energy sector in particular fights battles on multiple fronts, it’s sometimes too easy to be busy, for the sake of being busy. And being busy doesn’t always necessarily mean that what we’re doing is right.

It’s because of this that the most ambitious market movers won’t have given much time to yet another letter calling for greater clarity in the sector – judging instead that if the incentives aren’t already in place, then there are easier paths to follow.

Lobbying for an improvement in incentives certainly has its place and is vital if we are to keep the wind industry in good health. However, for the canny entrepreneur, that’s looking for early advantage, it’s an area where attention quickly starts to wane.

And that’s where the real danger lies. Because as the market diversifies and as the disconnect grows between those early pioneers and the wider industry and its supporting supply chain, there’s the very real possibility that the focus shifts from what the industry needs, to what people think the industry needs.

That’s why the news late last week that Narec, the UK’s national renewable energy centre, has completed construction on its new 100 metre blade testing facility is of interest.

The facility, that is part of an £80 million government investment on the Northumberland site, is the second of three structures to be completed at Blyth.

It’s a site that offers much potential. And provided it’s addressing the precise challenges that the manufacturers and the market face, then the deals will surely follow.

Unlike those Micronesian tribes, an investment of this nature means that Narec has had the opportunity and foresight to truly understand exactly what it’s getting involved in.

The landing strip has been cleared and the red carpet is being rolled out. In a year where the UK has a laser focus on infrastructure legacy and longevity, let’s hope that the team at Narec truly understand who’ll be setting foot on the tarmac.

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Full archive access is available to members only

Not a member yet?

Become a member of the 6,500-strong A Word About Wind community today, and gain access to our premium content, exclusive lead generation and investment opportunities.