Is bigger really better?

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Adam Barber
February 28, 2011
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This content is from our archive. Some formatting or links may be broken.
Is bigger really better?

With the focus on operating costs and profit margins set to escalate, perhaps it was only a matter of time before turbines got bigger. A lot bigger.

And if last Friday’s deals announced by the likes of GE and Alstrom are anything to go by, then the next swathe of supersized turbines is only just the start.

From a construction and manufacturing perspective it certainly makes sense – and the argument only grows stronger once you begin to factor in the anticipated growth within the European offshore market. (And let’s face it, if you’re sticking a turbine in some pretty rough seas – you might as well make it as solid as possible!)

However, what’s particularly interesting about all the talk of supersized turbines, is the serious logistical challenge that comes with it. Sure, the actual construction phase isn’t exactly easy but what happens when it comes to shipping, installing and servicing them? Are we about to see the support services begin to go supersized too?

With the focus on operating costs and profit margins set to escalate, perhaps it was only a matter of time before turbines got bigger. A lot bigger.

And if last Friday’s deals announced by the likes of GE and Alstrom are anything to go by, then the next swathe of supersized turbines is only just the start.

From a construction and manufacturing perspective it certainly makes sense – and the argument only grows stronger once you begin to factor in the anticipated growth within the European offshore market. (And let’s face it, if you’re sticking a turbine in some pretty rough seas – you might as well make it as solid as possible!)

However, what’s particularly interesting about all the talk of supersized turbines, is the serious logistical challenge that comes with it. Sure, the actual construction phase isn’t exactly easy but what happens when it comes to shipping, installing and servicing them? Are we about to see the support services begin to go supersized too?

With the focus on operating costs and profit margins set to escalate, perhaps it was only a matter of time before turbines got bigger. A lot bigger.

And if last Friday’s deals announced by the likes of GE and Alstrom are anything to go by, then the next swathe of supersized turbines is only just the start.

From a construction and manufacturing perspective it certainly makes sense – and the argument only grows stronger once you begin to factor in the anticipated growth within the European offshore market. (And let’s face it, if you’re sticking a turbine in some pretty rough seas – you might as well make it as solid as possible!)

However, what’s particularly interesting about all the talk of supersized turbines, is the serious logistical challenge that comes with it. Sure, the actual construction phase isn’t exactly easy but what happens when it comes to shipping, installing and servicing them? Are we about to see the support services begin to go supersized too?

With the focus on operating costs and profit margins set to escalate, perhaps it was only a matter of time before turbines got bigger. A lot bigger.

And if last Friday’s deals announced by the likes of GE and Alstrom are anything to go by, then the next swathe of supersized turbines is only just the start.

From a construction and manufacturing perspective it certainly makes sense – and the argument only grows stronger once you begin to factor in the anticipated growth within the European offshore market. (And let’s face it, if you’re sticking a turbine in some pretty rough seas – you might as well make it as solid as possible!)

However, what’s particularly interesting about all the talk of supersized turbines, is the serious logistical challenge that comes with it. Sure, the actual construction phase isn’t exactly easy but what happens when it comes to shipping, installing and servicing them? Are we about to see the support services begin to go supersized too?

With the focus on operating costs and profit margins set to escalate, perhaps it was only a matter of time before turbines got bigger. A lot bigger.

And if last Friday’s deals announced by the likes of GE and Alstrom are anything to go by, then the next swathe of supersized turbines is only just the start.

From a construction and manufacturing perspective it certainly makes sense – and the argument only grows stronger once you begin to factor in the anticipated growth within the European offshore market. (And let’s face it, if you’re sticking a turbine in some pretty rough seas – you might as well make it as solid as possible!)

However, what’s particularly interesting about all the talk of supersized turbines, is the serious logistical challenge that comes with it. Sure, the actual construction phase isn’t exactly easy but what happens when it comes to shipping, installing and servicing them? Are we about to see the support services begin to go supersized too?

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Become a member of the 6,500-strong A Word About Wind community today, and gain access to our premium content, exclusive lead generation and investment opportunities.