Industry Collaboration

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Adam Barber
November 4, 2012
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This content is from our archive. Some formatting or links may be broken.
Industry Collaboration

It’s very easy when, as an industry, you live and breathe renewable energy every day to become a bit inward looking. To narrow the focus too much, and not to listen to other cogent arguments from outsiders.

Of course many industry firms may only have one area of interest that keeps them focused on the minutiae, but that shouldn’t necessarily be a barrier to considering other opinions.

It’s something that was brought to mind by an announcement from Dong last week. You might have spotted it. It was the one that confirmed the firm was set to join other industry heavyweights in founding something called “The Energy Partnership – The European Coalition for Renewable Energy And Gas”. The aim of which is to create the conditions for a European energy market based upon the complementary use of renewable energy and gas.

To some in the industry, the idea of working with other energy sectors is anachronistic, particularly those based on fossil fuels. After all, the green credentials of some of these firms are a little thin.

But in the short term, it’s inevitable. Not only can the wind industry, particularly its offshore realm, learn a lot from the gas sector, but there are a number of energy firms, like Dong, which are certainly doing excellent work in wind energy, but still have feet in both camps.

In many respects, the sector needs to be a little less ideological and a little more commercially focused.

Realistically, nobody in the wind industry should expect 100% wind energy generation, or even 100% renewable energy generation. The energy mix will always be exactly that, a mix. In some countries it will involve nuclear and coal, in others it will involve shale gas. It is better, surely, to have a realistic focus on what is achievable. Otherwise it is all too easy for critics to dismiss the industry as populated by pipe-dreamers.

Indeed, a strength that the wind industry could really foster, and one that isn’t normally found in its traditional energy counterparts, is a spirit of collaboration.

It’s a sign of maturity that should demonstrate confidence and the self-belief that it is around to stay.

It’s very easy when, as an industry, you live and breathe renewable energy every day to become a bit inward looking. To narrow the focus too much, and not to listen to other cogent arguments from outsiders.

Of course many industry firms may only have one area of interest that keeps them focused on the minutiae, but that shouldn’t necessarily be a barrier to considering other opinions.

It’s something that was brought to mind by an announcement from Dong last week. You might have spotted it. It was the one that confirmed the firm was set to join other industry heavyweights in founding something called “The Energy Partnership – The European Coalition for Renewable Energy And Gas”. The aim of which is to create the conditions for a European energy market based upon the complementary use of renewable energy and gas.

To some in the industry, the idea of working with other energy sectors is anachronistic, particularly those based on fossil fuels. After all, the green credentials of some of these firms are a little thin.

But in the short term, it’s inevitable. Not only can the wind industry, particularly its offshore realm, learn a lot from the gas sector, but there are a number of energy firms, like Dong, which are certainly doing excellent work in wind energy, but still have feet in both camps.

In many respects, the sector needs to be a little less ideological and a little more commercially focused.

Realistically, nobody in the wind industry should expect 100% wind energy generation, or even 100% renewable energy generation. The energy mix will always be exactly that, a mix. In some countries it will involve nuclear and coal, in others it will involve shale gas. It is better, surely, to have a realistic focus on what is achievable. Otherwise it is all too easy for critics to dismiss the industry as populated by pipe-dreamers.

Indeed, a strength that the wind industry could really foster, and one that isn’t normally found in its traditional energy counterparts, is a spirit of collaboration.

It’s a sign of maturity that should demonstrate confidence and the self-belief that it is around to stay.

It’s very easy when, as an industry, you live and breathe renewable energy every day to become a bit inward looking. To narrow the focus too much, and not to listen to other cogent arguments from outsiders.

Of course many industry firms may only have one area of interest that keeps them focused on the minutiae, but that shouldn’t necessarily be a barrier to considering other opinions.

It’s something that was brought to mind by an announcement from Dong last week. You might have spotted it. It was the one that confirmed the firm was set to join other industry heavyweights in founding something called “The Energy Partnership – The European Coalition for Renewable Energy And Gas”. The aim of which is to create the conditions for a European energy market based upon the complementary use of renewable energy and gas.

To some in the industry, the idea of working with other energy sectors is anachronistic, particularly those based on fossil fuels. After all, the green credentials of some of these firms are a little thin.

But in the short term, it’s inevitable. Not only can the wind industry, particularly its offshore realm, learn a lot from the gas sector, but there are a number of energy firms, like Dong, which are certainly doing excellent work in wind energy, but still have feet in both camps.

In many respects, the sector needs to be a little less ideological and a little more commercially focused.

Realistically, nobody in the wind industry should expect 100% wind energy generation, or even 100% renewable energy generation. The energy mix will always be exactly that, a mix. In some countries it will involve nuclear and coal, in others it will involve shale gas. It is better, surely, to have a realistic focus on what is achievable. Otherwise it is all too easy for critics to dismiss the industry as populated by pipe-dreamers.

Indeed, a strength that the wind industry could really foster, and one that isn’t normally found in its traditional energy counterparts, is a spirit of collaboration.

It’s a sign of maturity that should demonstrate confidence and the self-belief that it is around to stay.

It’s very easy when, as an industry, you live and breathe renewable energy every day to become a bit inward looking. To narrow the focus too much, and not to listen to other cogent arguments from outsiders.

Of course many industry firms may only have one area of interest that keeps them focused on the minutiae, but that shouldn’t necessarily be a barrier to considering other opinions.

It’s something that was brought to mind by an announcement from Dong last week. You might have spotted it. It was the one that confirmed the firm was set to join other industry heavyweights in founding something called “The Energy Partnership – The European Coalition for Renewable Energy And Gas”. The aim of which is to create the conditions for a European energy market based upon the complementary use of renewable energy and gas.

To some in the industry, the idea of working with other energy sectors is anachronistic, particularly those based on fossil fuels. After all, the green credentials of some of these firms are a little thin.

But in the short term, it’s inevitable. Not only can the wind industry, particularly its offshore realm, learn a lot from the gas sector, but there are a number of energy firms, like Dong, which are certainly doing excellent work in wind energy, but still have feet in both camps.

In many respects, the sector needs to be a little less ideological and a little more commercially focused.

Realistically, nobody in the wind industry should expect 100% wind energy generation, or even 100% renewable energy generation. The energy mix will always be exactly that, a mix. In some countries it will involve nuclear and coal, in others it will involve shale gas. It is better, surely, to have a realistic focus on what is achievable. Otherwise it is all too easy for critics to dismiss the industry as populated by pipe-dreamers.

Indeed, a strength that the wind industry could really foster, and one that isn’t normally found in its traditional energy counterparts, is a spirit of collaboration.

It’s a sign of maturity that should demonstrate confidence and the self-belief that it is around to stay.

It’s very easy when, as an industry, you live and breathe renewable energy every day to become a bit inward looking. To narrow the focus too much, and not to listen to other cogent arguments from outsiders.

Of course many industry firms may only have one area of interest that keeps them focused on the minutiae, but that shouldn’t necessarily be a barrier to considering other opinions.

It’s something that was brought to mind by an announcement from Dong last week. You might have spotted it. It was the one that confirmed the firm was set to join other industry heavyweights in founding something called “The Energy Partnership – The European Coalition for Renewable Energy And Gas”. The aim of which is to create the conditions for a European energy market based upon the complementary use of renewable energy and gas.

To some in the industry, the idea of working with other energy sectors is anachronistic, particularly those based on fossil fuels. After all, the green credentials of some of these firms are a little thin.

But in the short term, it’s inevitable. Not only can the wind industry, particularly its offshore realm, learn a lot from the gas sector, but there are a number of energy firms, like Dong, which are certainly doing excellent work in wind energy, but still have feet in both camps.

In many respects, the sector needs to be a little less ideological and a little more commercially focused.

Realistically, nobody in the wind industry should expect 100% wind energy generation, or even 100% renewable energy generation. The energy mix will always be exactly that, a mix. In some countries it will involve nuclear and coal, in others it will involve shale gas. It is better, surely, to have a realistic focus on what is achievable. Otherwise it is all too easy for critics to dismiss the industry as populated by pipe-dreamers.

Indeed, a strength that the wind industry could really foster, and one that isn’t normally found in its traditional energy counterparts, is a spirit of collaboration.

It’s a sign of maturity that should demonstrate confidence and the self-belief that it is around to stay.

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Not a member yet?

Become a member of the 6,500-strong A Word About Wind community today, and gain access to our premium content, exclusive lead generation and investment opportunities.