Green takes centre stage in US presidential race

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Richard Heap
July 31, 2015
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This content is from our archive. Some formatting or links may be broken.
Green takes centre stage in US presidential race

If Hillary Clinton becomes US president in November 2016 then this should give a boost to investors in the country’s wind industry. She certainly looks better than the alternatives.

There is still a long way for Clinton to go in the race to succeed Barack Obama. She may be the leading presidential candidate for the Democrats but a nomination is not a foregone conclusion.

Then she would face fierce competition from the Republicans, whose leading candidates for a presidential nomination include former Florida governor Jeb Bush and the wind-hating billionaire property tycoon Donald Trump. Even so, she is a strong candidate.

In the last week Clinton has put renewable energy at the centre of her campaign.

She has said that, under her presidency, there would be 500million solar panels installed in the US by 2020; and that all homes in the US would be powered by renewable energy by 2024.

This would take renewables to 33% of the energy mix by 2027, compared with Obama’s 25% target over the same period, and quells the fears among green groups that she would roll back Obama’s policies. Clinton will reveal more on her plans this year.

Clinton is also looking to launch a Clean Energy Challenge to give states and communities financial incentives to exceed energy and climate change targets of the US Environmental Protection Agency. This is another move that would help investors in wind and solar.

The main concern from those in the wind industry will be that Clinton’s plan focuses more on solar than wind, but it seems churlish to complain about that. The fact is that she is the most pro-renewables of the leading 2016 presidential candidates.

We need only look more closely at the plans of a couple of her rivals to see there really is no other green choice.

For example, last week Jeb Bush said he wanted to scrap subsidies for oil and gas firms, which sounds like it should be good news for the renewable energy sector. In fact, it is the opposite. Bush actually wants to get rid of subsidies for all energy sectors, including wind, and this would make it much tougher for green energy companies to compete financially.

Effectively, he wants wind to compete on an even footing with a sector that has had a century's headstart. We could spend days debating what level of subsidies are appropriate, but expecting even competition here would clearly harm wind investors.

And then there is Donald Trump, whose hostility to wind farms — especially those near his golf resort in Aberdeenshire in Scotland— hardly needs stating. It is easy to dismiss his presidential run as a joke but, while he is running, we must be alive to the threat.

While Trump is highly unlikely to be president, his high-profile bid to become president has at least highlighted one thing: he owns shares in US wind investor NextEra Energy. It is good ammunition for the next wind developer who attracts Trump's ire.

His spokesman has denied accusations of hypocrisy because a proportion of Trump’s, money is managed by Deutsche Asset & Wealth Management A/C 1 Brokerage Acct Holdings.

But Trump is still a sideshow. It is the main battle between Bush and Clinton that we are watching with the most interest.

If Hillary Clinton becomes US president in November 2016 then this should give a boost to investors in the country’s wind industry. She certainly looks better than the alternatives.

There is still a long way for Clinton to go in the race to succeed Barack Obama. She may be the leading presidential candidate for the Democrats but a nomination is not a foregone conclusion.

Then she would face fierce competition from the Republicans, whose leading candidates for a presidential nomination include former Florida governor Jeb Bush and the wind-hating billionaire property tycoon Donald Trump. Even so, she is a strong candidate.

In the last week Clinton has put renewable energy at the centre of her campaign.

She has said that, under her presidency, there would be 500million solar panels installed in the US by 2020; and that all homes in the US would be powered by renewable energy by 2024.

This would take renewables to 33% of the energy mix by 2027, compared with Obama’s 25% target over the same period, and quells the fears among green groups that she would roll back Obama’s policies. Clinton will reveal more on her plans this year.

Clinton is also looking to launch a Clean Energy Challenge to give states and communities financial incentives to exceed energy and climate change targets of the US Environmental Protection Agency. This is another move that would help investors in wind and solar.

The main concern from those in the wind industry will be that Clinton’s plan focuses more on solar than wind, but it seems churlish to complain about that. The fact is that she is the most pro-renewables of the leading 2016 presidential candidates.

We need only look more closely at the plans of a couple of her rivals to see there really is no other green choice.

For example, last week Jeb Bush said he wanted to scrap subsidies for oil and gas firms, which sounds like it should be good news for the renewable energy sector. In fact, it is the opposite. Bush actually wants to get rid of subsidies for all energy sectors, including wind, and this would make it much tougher for green energy companies to compete financially.

Effectively, he wants wind to compete on an even footing with a sector that has had a century's headstart. We could spend days debating what level of subsidies are appropriate, but expecting even competition here would clearly harm wind investors.

And then there is Donald Trump, whose hostility to wind farms — especially those near his golf resort in Aberdeenshire in Scotland— hardly needs stating. It is easy to dismiss his presidential run as a joke but, while he is running, we must be alive to the threat.

While Trump is highly unlikely to be president, his high-profile bid to become president has at least highlighted one thing: he owns shares in US wind investor NextEra Energy. It is good ammunition for the next wind developer who attracts Trump's ire.

His spokesman has denied accusations of hypocrisy because a proportion of Trump’s, money is managed by Deutsche Asset & Wealth Management A/C 1 Brokerage Acct Holdings.

But Trump is still a sideshow. It is the main battle between Bush and Clinton that we are watching with the most interest.

If Hillary Clinton becomes US president in November 2016 then this should give a boost to investors in the country’s wind industry. She certainly looks better than the alternatives.

There is still a long way for Clinton to go in the race to succeed Barack Obama. She may be the leading presidential candidate for the Democrats but a nomination is not a foregone conclusion.

Then she would face fierce competition from the Republicans, whose leading candidates for a presidential nomination include former Florida governor Jeb Bush and the wind-hating billionaire property tycoon Donald Trump. Even so, she is a strong candidate.

In the last week Clinton has put renewable energy at the centre of her campaign.

She has said that, under her presidency, there would be 500million solar panels installed in the US by 2020; and that all homes in the US would be powered by renewable energy by 2024.

This would take renewables to 33% of the energy mix by 2027, compared with Obama’s 25% target over the same period, and quells the fears among green groups that she would roll back Obama’s policies. Clinton will reveal more on her plans this year.

Clinton is also looking to launch a Clean Energy Challenge to give states and communities financial incentives to exceed energy and climate change targets of the US Environmental Protection Agency. This is another move that would help investors in wind and solar.

The main concern from those in the wind industry will be that Clinton’s plan focuses more on solar than wind, but it seems churlish to complain about that. The fact is that she is the most pro-renewables of the leading 2016 presidential candidates.

We need only look more closely at the plans of a couple of her rivals to see there really is no other green choice.

For example, last week Jeb Bush said he wanted to scrap subsidies for oil and gas firms, which sounds like it should be good news for the renewable energy sector. In fact, it is the opposite. Bush actually wants to get rid of subsidies for all energy sectors, including wind, and this would make it much tougher for green energy companies to compete financially.

Effectively, he wants wind to compete on an even footing with a sector that has had a century's headstart. We could spend days debating what level of subsidies are appropriate, but expecting even competition here would clearly harm wind investors.

And then there is Donald Trump, whose hostility to wind farms — especially those near his golf resort in Aberdeenshire in Scotland— hardly needs stating. It is easy to dismiss his presidential run as a joke but, while he is running, we must be alive to the threat.

While Trump is highly unlikely to be president, his high-profile bid to become president has at least highlighted one thing: he owns shares in US wind investor NextEra Energy. It is good ammunition for the next wind developer who attracts Trump's ire.

His spokesman has denied accusations of hypocrisy because a proportion of Trump’s, money is managed by Deutsche Asset & Wealth Management A/C 1 Brokerage Acct Holdings.

But Trump is still a sideshow. It is the main battle between Bush and Clinton that we are watching with the most interest.

If Hillary Clinton becomes US president in November 2016 then this should give a boost to investors in the country’s wind industry. She certainly looks better than the alternatives.

There is still a long way for Clinton to go in the race to succeed Barack Obama. She may be the leading presidential candidate for the Democrats but a nomination is not a foregone conclusion.

Then she would face fierce competition from the Republicans, whose leading candidates for a presidential nomination include former Florida governor Jeb Bush and the wind-hating billionaire property tycoon Donald Trump. Even so, she is a strong candidate.

In the last week Clinton has put renewable energy at the centre of her campaign.

She has said that, under her presidency, there would be 500million solar panels installed in the US by 2020; and that all homes in the US would be powered by renewable energy by 2024.

This would take renewables to 33% of the energy mix by 2027, compared with Obama’s 25% target over the same period, and quells the fears among green groups that she would roll back Obama’s policies. Clinton will reveal more on her plans this year.

Clinton is also looking to launch a Clean Energy Challenge to give states and communities financial incentives to exceed energy and climate change targets of the US Environmental Protection Agency. This is another move that would help investors in wind and solar.

The main concern from those in the wind industry will be that Clinton’s plan focuses more on solar than wind, but it seems churlish to complain about that. The fact is that she is the most pro-renewables of the leading 2016 presidential candidates.

We need only look more closely at the plans of a couple of her rivals to see there really is no other green choice.

For example, last week Jeb Bush said he wanted to scrap subsidies for oil and gas firms, which sounds like it should be good news for the renewable energy sector. In fact, it is the opposite. Bush actually wants to get rid of subsidies for all energy sectors, including wind, and this would make it much tougher for green energy companies to compete financially.

Effectively, he wants wind to compete on an even footing with a sector that has had a century's headstart. We could spend days debating what level of subsidies are appropriate, but expecting even competition here would clearly harm wind investors.

And then there is Donald Trump, whose hostility to wind farms — especially those near his golf resort in Aberdeenshire in Scotland— hardly needs stating. It is easy to dismiss his presidential run as a joke but, while he is running, we must be alive to the threat.

While Trump is highly unlikely to be president, his high-profile bid to become president has at least highlighted one thing: he owns shares in US wind investor NextEra Energy. It is good ammunition for the next wind developer who attracts Trump's ire.

His spokesman has denied accusations of hypocrisy because a proportion of Trump’s, money is managed by Deutsche Asset & Wealth Management A/C 1 Brokerage Acct Holdings.

But Trump is still a sideshow. It is the main battle between Bush and Clinton that we are watching with the most interest.

If Hillary Clinton becomes US president in November 2016 then this should give a boost to investors in the country’s wind industry. She certainly looks better than the alternatives.

There is still a long way for Clinton to go in the race to succeed Barack Obama. She may be the leading presidential candidate for the Democrats but a nomination is not a foregone conclusion.

Then she would face fierce competition from the Republicans, whose leading candidates for a presidential nomination include former Florida governor Jeb Bush and the wind-hating billionaire property tycoon Donald Trump. Even so, she is a strong candidate.

In the last week Clinton has put renewable energy at the centre of her campaign.

She has said that, under her presidency, there would be 500million solar panels installed in the US by 2020; and that all homes in the US would be powered by renewable energy by 2024.

This would take renewables to 33% of the energy mix by 2027, compared with Obama’s 25% target over the same period, and quells the fears among green groups that she would roll back Obama’s policies. Clinton will reveal more on her plans this year.

Clinton is also looking to launch a Clean Energy Challenge to give states and communities financial incentives to exceed energy and climate change targets of the US Environmental Protection Agency. This is another move that would help investors in wind and solar.

The main concern from those in the wind industry will be that Clinton’s plan focuses more on solar than wind, but it seems churlish to complain about that. The fact is that she is the most pro-renewables of the leading 2016 presidential candidates.

We need only look more closely at the plans of a couple of her rivals to see there really is no other green choice.

For example, last week Jeb Bush said he wanted to scrap subsidies for oil and gas firms, which sounds like it should be good news for the renewable energy sector. In fact, it is the opposite. Bush actually wants to get rid of subsidies for all energy sectors, including wind, and this would make it much tougher for green energy companies to compete financially.

Effectively, he wants wind to compete on an even footing with a sector that has had a century's headstart. We could spend days debating what level of subsidies are appropriate, but expecting even competition here would clearly harm wind investors.

And then there is Donald Trump, whose hostility to wind farms — especially those near his golf resort in Aberdeenshire in Scotland— hardly needs stating. It is easy to dismiss his presidential run as a joke but, while he is running, we must be alive to the threat.

While Trump is highly unlikely to be president, his high-profile bid to become president has at least highlighted one thing: he owns shares in US wind investor NextEra Energy. It is good ammunition for the next wind developer who attracts Trump's ire.

His spokesman has denied accusations of hypocrisy because a proportion of Trump’s, money is managed by Deutsche Asset & Wealth Management A/C 1 Brokerage Acct Holdings.

But Trump is still a sideshow. It is the main battle between Bush and Clinton that we are watching with the most interest.

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Not a member yet?

Become a member of the 6,500-strong A Word About Wind community today, and gain access to our premium content, exclusive lead generation and investment opportunities.