German storage progress must hearten investors

Topics
No items found.
Richard Heap
September 22, 2014
This content is from our archive. Some formatting or links may be broken.
This content is from our archive. Some formatting or links may be broken.
German storage progress must hearten investors

Thousands of wind professionals are set to attend the WindEnergy Hamburg conference in Germany this week. They will spend four days discussing the new trends and innovations.

And we expect some of that chat to focus on a new project just 100km east of Hamburg. It is the size of a school gymnasium. It cost €6m. And it gives us a vision of wind’s future.

Last Wednesday, north German utility Wemag opened what it claims is Europe’s first grid-scale battery plant to help store energy from renewable power sources, including wind.

This is an important development for wind investors as such technology is set to make it easier for them to maximise the value of their wind farms; and enable the wind sector to provide a growing percentage of total energy use in countries all over the world.

It should also quell complaints that wind farms are only useful when the wind blows.

The Wemag facility has a capacity of 5MW and was built by German battery storage firm Younicos. It runs on 35,600 Samsung lithium ion batteries. And it serves an area of 8,600 sq km around the city of Schwerin. These are all impressive numbers.

But the aspects that intrigue us most are those we referred to in the introduction. This plant cost €6m and is the size of a school gym. These make the project look almost humdrum and, seriously, that’s a good thing. This shows battery storage is not an expensive luxury, but something that investors and developers can do now.

The theory is that this means that wind farm operators can store excess energy and sell it to the grid when there is demand.

This helps grid operators to smooth out the peaks and troughs in demand caused by intermittent sources such as wind and solar; and helps the wind farm operators to make money by selling energy that would otherwise be wasted.

We need to see how it works in practice, of course, but irrespective, it is good that the technology is at the stage where that analysis can be carried out.

The Wemag development also sends a message to investors that Germany wants to stay at the forefront of renewable energy innovation. Last month, chancellor Angela Merkel’s government brought in changes to the Renewable Energy Sources Act that are seeking to drive down the cost of wind subsidies. Yes, this imposes tougher rules on wind developers. However, it also sets out a clear path towards a more certain future. The industry has accepted these changes and it’s these details that help satisfy investors.

For remember, Germany intends to source 60% of its energy from renewable mean by 2035. That’s a big jump from the 25% that’s sourced right now and it simply underscores the increasingly critical role that technological innovation simply has to play to achieve this.

If successful, it will help Germany retain pole position within wind, while at the same time having huge ramifications for more mainstream adoption around the world.

Energy storage with grid innovation is imperative. And it may put paid to that old question about what happens when there's no wind.

Thousands of wind professionals are set to attend the WindEnergy Hamburg conference in Germany this week. They will spend four days discussing the new trends and innovations.

And we expect some of that chat to focus on a new project just 100km east of Hamburg. It is the size of a school gymnasium. It cost €6m. And it gives us a vision of wind’s future.

Last Wednesday, north German utility Wemag opened what it claims is Europe’s first grid-scale battery plant to help store energy from renewable power sources, including wind.

This is an important development for wind investors as such technology is set to make it easier for them to maximise the value of their wind farms; and enable the wind sector to provide a growing percentage of total energy use in countries all over the world.

It should also quell complaints that wind farms are only useful when the wind blows.

The Wemag facility has a capacity of 5MW and was built by German battery storage firm Younicos. It runs on 35,600 Samsung lithium ion batteries. And it serves an area of 8,600 sq km around the city of Schwerin. These are all impressive numbers.

But the aspects that intrigue us most are those we referred to in the introduction. This plant cost €6m and is the size of a school gym. These make the project look almost humdrum and, seriously, that’s a good thing. This shows battery storage is not an expensive luxury, but something that investors and developers can do now.

The theory is that this means that wind farm operators can store excess energy and sell it to the grid when there is demand.

This helps grid operators to smooth out the peaks and troughs in demand caused by intermittent sources such as wind and solar; and helps the wind farm operators to make money by selling energy that would otherwise be wasted.

We need to see how it works in practice, of course, but irrespective, it is good that the technology is at the stage where that analysis can be carried out.

The Wemag development also sends a message to investors that Germany wants to stay at the forefront of renewable energy innovation. Last month, chancellor Angela Merkel’s government brought in changes to the Renewable Energy Sources Act that are seeking to drive down the cost of wind subsidies. Yes, this imposes tougher rules on wind developers. However, it also sets out a clear path towards a more certain future. The industry has accepted these changes and it’s these details that help satisfy investors.

For remember, Germany intends to source 60% of its energy from renewable mean by 2035. That’s a big jump from the 25% that’s sourced right now and it simply underscores the increasingly critical role that technological innovation simply has to play to achieve this.

If successful, it will help Germany retain pole position within wind, while at the same time having huge ramifications for more mainstream adoption around the world.

Energy storage with grid innovation is imperative. And it may put paid to that old question about what happens when there's no wind.

Thousands of wind professionals are set to attend the WindEnergy Hamburg conference in Germany this week. They will spend four days discussing the new trends and innovations.

And we expect some of that chat to focus on a new project just 100km east of Hamburg. It is the size of a school gymnasium. It cost €6m. And it gives us a vision of wind’s future.

Last Wednesday, north German utility Wemag opened what it claims is Europe’s first grid-scale battery plant to help store energy from renewable power sources, including wind.

This is an important development for wind investors as such technology is set to make it easier for them to maximise the value of their wind farms; and enable the wind sector to provide a growing percentage of total energy use in countries all over the world.

It should also quell complaints that wind farms are only useful when the wind blows.

The Wemag facility has a capacity of 5MW and was built by German battery storage firm Younicos. It runs on 35,600 Samsung lithium ion batteries. And it serves an area of 8,600 sq km around the city of Schwerin. These are all impressive numbers.

But the aspects that intrigue us most are those we referred to in the introduction. This plant cost €6m and is the size of a school gym. These make the project look almost humdrum and, seriously, that’s a good thing. This shows battery storage is not an expensive luxury, but something that investors and developers can do now.

The theory is that this means that wind farm operators can store excess energy and sell it to the grid when there is demand.

This helps grid operators to smooth out the peaks and troughs in demand caused by intermittent sources such as wind and solar; and helps the wind farm operators to make money by selling energy that would otherwise be wasted.

We need to see how it works in practice, of course, but irrespective, it is good that the technology is at the stage where that analysis can be carried out.

The Wemag development also sends a message to investors that Germany wants to stay at the forefront of renewable energy innovation. Last month, chancellor Angela Merkel’s government brought in changes to the Renewable Energy Sources Act that are seeking to drive down the cost of wind subsidies. Yes, this imposes tougher rules on wind developers. However, it also sets out a clear path towards a more certain future. The industry has accepted these changes and it’s these details that help satisfy investors.

For remember, Germany intends to source 60% of its energy from renewable mean by 2035. That’s a big jump from the 25% that’s sourced right now and it simply underscores the increasingly critical role that technological innovation simply has to play to achieve this.

If successful, it will help Germany retain pole position within wind, while at the same time having huge ramifications for more mainstream adoption around the world.

Energy storage with grid innovation is imperative. And it may put paid to that old question about what happens when there's no wind.

Thousands of wind professionals are set to attend the WindEnergy Hamburg conference in Germany this week. They will spend four days discussing the new trends and innovations.

And we expect some of that chat to focus on a new project just 100km east of Hamburg. It is the size of a school gymnasium. It cost €6m. And it gives us a vision of wind’s future.

Last Wednesday, north German utility Wemag opened what it claims is Europe’s first grid-scale battery plant to help store energy from renewable power sources, including wind.

This is an important development for wind investors as such technology is set to make it easier for them to maximise the value of their wind farms; and enable the wind sector to provide a growing percentage of total energy use in countries all over the world.

It should also quell complaints that wind farms are only useful when the wind blows.

The Wemag facility has a capacity of 5MW and was built by German battery storage firm Younicos. It runs on 35,600 Samsung lithium ion batteries. And it serves an area of 8,600 sq km around the city of Schwerin. These are all impressive numbers.

But the aspects that intrigue us most are those we referred to in the introduction. This plant cost €6m and is the size of a school gym. These make the project look almost humdrum and, seriously, that’s a good thing. This shows battery storage is not an expensive luxury, but something that investors and developers can do now.

The theory is that this means that wind farm operators can store excess energy and sell it to the grid when there is demand.

This helps grid operators to smooth out the peaks and troughs in demand caused by intermittent sources such as wind and solar; and helps the wind farm operators to make money by selling energy that would otherwise be wasted.

We need to see how it works in practice, of course, but irrespective, it is good that the technology is at the stage where that analysis can be carried out.

The Wemag development also sends a message to investors that Germany wants to stay at the forefront of renewable energy innovation. Last month, chancellor Angela Merkel’s government brought in changes to the Renewable Energy Sources Act that are seeking to drive down the cost of wind subsidies. Yes, this imposes tougher rules on wind developers. However, it also sets out a clear path towards a more certain future. The industry has accepted these changes and it’s these details that help satisfy investors.

For remember, Germany intends to source 60% of its energy from renewable mean by 2035. That’s a big jump from the 25% that’s sourced right now and it simply underscores the increasingly critical role that technological innovation simply has to play to achieve this.

If successful, it will help Germany retain pole position within wind, while at the same time having huge ramifications for more mainstream adoption around the world.

Energy storage with grid innovation is imperative. And it may put paid to that old question about what happens when there's no wind.

Thousands of wind professionals are set to attend the WindEnergy Hamburg conference in Germany this week. They will spend four days discussing the new trends and innovations.

And we expect some of that chat to focus on a new project just 100km east of Hamburg. It is the size of a school gymnasium. It cost €6m. And it gives us a vision of wind’s future.

Last Wednesday, north German utility Wemag opened what it claims is Europe’s first grid-scale battery plant to help store energy from renewable power sources, including wind.

This is an important development for wind investors as such technology is set to make it easier for them to maximise the value of their wind farms; and enable the wind sector to provide a growing percentage of total energy use in countries all over the world.

It should also quell complaints that wind farms are only useful when the wind blows.

The Wemag facility has a capacity of 5MW and was built by German battery storage firm Younicos. It runs on 35,600 Samsung lithium ion batteries. And it serves an area of 8,600 sq km around the city of Schwerin. These are all impressive numbers.

But the aspects that intrigue us most are those we referred to in the introduction. This plant cost €6m and is the size of a school gym. These make the project look almost humdrum and, seriously, that’s a good thing. This shows battery storage is not an expensive luxury, but something that investors and developers can do now.

The theory is that this means that wind farm operators can store excess energy and sell it to the grid when there is demand.

This helps grid operators to smooth out the peaks and troughs in demand caused by intermittent sources such as wind and solar; and helps the wind farm operators to make money by selling energy that would otherwise be wasted.

We need to see how it works in practice, of course, but irrespective, it is good that the technology is at the stage where that analysis can be carried out.

The Wemag development also sends a message to investors that Germany wants to stay at the forefront of renewable energy innovation. Last month, chancellor Angela Merkel’s government brought in changes to the Renewable Energy Sources Act that are seeking to drive down the cost of wind subsidies. Yes, this imposes tougher rules on wind developers. However, it also sets out a clear path towards a more certain future. The industry has accepted these changes and it’s these details that help satisfy investors.

For remember, Germany intends to source 60% of its energy from renewable mean by 2035. That’s a big jump from the 25% that’s sourced right now and it simply underscores the increasingly critical role that technological innovation simply has to play to achieve this.

If successful, it will help Germany retain pole position within wind, while at the same time having huge ramifications for more mainstream adoption around the world.

Energy storage with grid innovation is imperative. And it may put paid to that old question about what happens when there's no wind.

Full archive access is available to members only

Not a member yet?

Become a member of the 6,500-strong A Word About Wind community today, and gain access to our premium content, exclusive lead generation and investment opportunities.

Full archive access is available to members only

Not a member yet?

Become a member of the 6,500-strong A Word About Wind community today, and gain access to our premium content, exclusive lead generation and investment opportunities.