Beware of Market Ignorance

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Adam Barber
June 24, 2013
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This content is from our archive. Some formatting or links may be broken.
Beware of Market Ignorance



Ignorance isn’t an oft-lauded trait. In fact, it’s actively shied away from for fear of embarrassment, awkward questions and possibly even failure.

Moreover, it matters not what market you’re operating in – the simple truth is that for many, an expression of ignorance can be seen as a chance to show up weaknesses and a lack of knowledge.

A potentially worrying scenario for many – leading to a fear that partners, prospects and peers will all too easily seek to leverage and exploit.

But here’s the thing. While long-term industry ignorance can indeed be a cause for concern – particularly when it’s apparent that there’s no real desire from an individual or company to address it – the reality is that ignorance itself, is in fact no bad characteristic.

Far from it. Since for new market participants keen on bringing new ideas and innovation to a sector, in can often be an individual’s single greatest strength.

Why? Primarily because industry ignorance injects an unrivalled willingness to listen and an unparalleled enthusiasm to learn.

These are two not insignificant attributes. And perhaps more importantly, they’re two character traits that are of increasing importance when it comes to the future growth and evolution of wind.

For, while the various battles that continue to be fought within country and state jurisdictions are of course unique, there’s a wider prize on offer and at stake.

Namely, the constant challenge to continue to innovate. To develop market thinking. To challenge the accepted way of doing things. And to question the status quo.

It’s precisely this thinking that moves specific areas of the market forwards – whether it’s related to the intricacies of foundations and grouting, gearboxes and drive trains, wider issues associated with blade evolution and nacelle design, or something else.

Sure, the market has made some real leaps within the past five, ten and fifteen years. And sure, we all recognise the urgency to rapidly develop and build out apprenticeship schemes and training programmes that put us on a path to growth.

However, as the sector continues to develop and as the workforce expands with it, let’s not forget that as we introduce new talent to the market, taking the time to listen and to learn with them, is as important as the need to tutor and to teach.



Ignorance isn’t an oft-lauded trait. In fact, it’s actively shied away from for fear of embarrassment, awkward questions and possibly even failure.

Moreover, it matters not what market you’re operating in – the simple truth is that for many, an expression of ignorance can be seen as a chance to show up weaknesses and a lack of knowledge.

A potentially worrying scenario for many – leading to a fear that partners, prospects and peers will all too easily seek to leverage and exploit.

But here’s the thing. While long-term industry ignorance can indeed be a cause for concern – particularly when it’s apparent that there’s no real desire from an individual or company to address it – the reality is that ignorance itself, is in fact no bad characteristic.

Far from it. Since for new market participants keen on bringing new ideas and innovation to a sector, in can often be an individual’s single greatest strength.

Why? Primarily because industry ignorance injects an unrivalled willingness to listen and an unparalleled enthusiasm to learn.

These are two not insignificant attributes. And perhaps more importantly, they’re two character traits that are of increasing importance when it comes to the future growth and evolution of wind.

For, while the various battles that continue to be fought within country and state jurisdictions are of course unique, there’s a wider prize on offer and at stake.

Namely, the constant challenge to continue to innovate. To develop market thinking. To challenge the accepted way of doing things. And to question the status quo.

It’s precisely this thinking that moves specific areas of the market forwards – whether it’s related to the intricacies of foundations and grouting, gearboxes and drive trains, wider issues associated with blade evolution and nacelle design, or something else.

Sure, the market has made some real leaps within the past five, ten and fifteen years. And sure, we all recognise the urgency to rapidly develop and build out apprenticeship schemes and training programmes that put us on a path to growth.

However, as the sector continues to develop and as the workforce expands with it, let’s not forget that as we introduce new talent to the market, taking the time to listen and to learn with them, is as important as the need to tutor and to teach.



Ignorance isn’t an oft-lauded trait. In fact, it’s actively shied away from for fear of embarrassment, awkward questions and possibly even failure.

Moreover, it matters not what market you’re operating in – the simple truth is that for many, an expression of ignorance can be seen as a chance to show up weaknesses and a lack of knowledge.

A potentially worrying scenario for many – leading to a fear that partners, prospects and peers will all too easily seek to leverage and exploit.

But here’s the thing. While long-term industry ignorance can indeed be a cause for concern – particularly when it’s apparent that there’s no real desire from an individual or company to address it – the reality is that ignorance itself, is in fact no bad characteristic.

Far from it. Since for new market participants keen on bringing new ideas and innovation to a sector, in can often be an individual’s single greatest strength.

Why? Primarily because industry ignorance injects an unrivalled willingness to listen and an unparalleled enthusiasm to learn.

These are two not insignificant attributes. And perhaps more importantly, they’re two character traits that are of increasing importance when it comes to the future growth and evolution of wind.

For, while the various battles that continue to be fought within country and state jurisdictions are of course unique, there’s a wider prize on offer and at stake.

Namely, the constant challenge to continue to innovate. To develop market thinking. To challenge the accepted way of doing things. And to question the status quo.

It’s precisely this thinking that moves specific areas of the market forwards – whether it’s related to the intricacies of foundations and grouting, gearboxes and drive trains, wider issues associated with blade evolution and nacelle design, or something else.

Sure, the market has made some real leaps within the past five, ten and fifteen years. And sure, we all recognise the urgency to rapidly develop and build out apprenticeship schemes and training programmes that put us on a path to growth.

However, as the sector continues to develop and as the workforce expands with it, let’s not forget that as we introduce new talent to the market, taking the time to listen and to learn with them, is as important as the need to tutor and to teach.



Ignorance isn’t an oft-lauded trait. In fact, it’s actively shied away from for fear of embarrassment, awkward questions and possibly even failure.

Moreover, it matters not what market you’re operating in – the simple truth is that for many, an expression of ignorance can be seen as a chance to show up weaknesses and a lack of knowledge.

A potentially worrying scenario for many – leading to a fear that partners, prospects and peers will all too easily seek to leverage and exploit.

But here’s the thing. While long-term industry ignorance can indeed be a cause for concern – particularly when it’s apparent that there’s no real desire from an individual or company to address it – the reality is that ignorance itself, is in fact no bad characteristic.

Far from it. Since for new market participants keen on bringing new ideas and innovation to a sector, in can often be an individual’s single greatest strength.

Why? Primarily because industry ignorance injects an unrivalled willingness to listen and an unparalleled enthusiasm to learn.

These are two not insignificant attributes. And perhaps more importantly, they’re two character traits that are of increasing importance when it comes to the future growth and evolution of wind.

For, while the various battles that continue to be fought within country and state jurisdictions are of course unique, there’s a wider prize on offer and at stake.

Namely, the constant challenge to continue to innovate. To develop market thinking. To challenge the accepted way of doing things. And to question the status quo.

It’s precisely this thinking that moves specific areas of the market forwards – whether it’s related to the intricacies of foundations and grouting, gearboxes and drive trains, wider issues associated with blade evolution and nacelle design, or something else.

Sure, the market has made some real leaps within the past five, ten and fifteen years. And sure, we all recognise the urgency to rapidly develop and build out apprenticeship schemes and training programmes that put us on a path to growth.

However, as the sector continues to develop and as the workforce expands with it, let’s not forget that as we introduce new talent to the market, taking the time to listen and to learn with them, is as important as the need to tutor and to teach.



Ignorance isn’t an oft-lauded trait. In fact, it’s actively shied away from for fear of embarrassment, awkward questions and possibly even failure.

Moreover, it matters not what market you’re operating in – the simple truth is that for many, an expression of ignorance can be seen as a chance to show up weaknesses and a lack of knowledge.

A potentially worrying scenario for many – leading to a fear that partners, prospects and peers will all too easily seek to leverage and exploit.

But here’s the thing. While long-term industry ignorance can indeed be a cause for concern – particularly when it’s apparent that there’s no real desire from an individual or company to address it – the reality is that ignorance itself, is in fact no bad characteristic.

Far from it. Since for new market participants keen on bringing new ideas and innovation to a sector, in can often be an individual’s single greatest strength.

Why? Primarily because industry ignorance injects an unrivalled willingness to listen and an unparalleled enthusiasm to learn.

These are two not insignificant attributes. And perhaps more importantly, they’re two character traits that are of increasing importance when it comes to the future growth and evolution of wind.

For, while the various battles that continue to be fought within country and state jurisdictions are of course unique, there’s a wider prize on offer and at stake.

Namely, the constant challenge to continue to innovate. To develop market thinking. To challenge the accepted way of doing things. And to question the status quo.

It’s precisely this thinking that moves specific areas of the market forwards – whether it’s related to the intricacies of foundations and grouting, gearboxes and drive trains, wider issues associated with blade evolution and nacelle design, or something else.

Sure, the market has made some real leaps within the past five, ten and fifteen years. And sure, we all recognise the urgency to rapidly develop and build out apprenticeship schemes and training programmes that put us on a path to growth.

However, as the sector continues to develop and as the workforce expands with it, let’s not forget that as we introduce new talent to the market, taking the time to listen and to learn with them, is as important as the need to tutor and to teach.

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Become a member of the 6,500-strong A Word About Wind community today, and gain access to our premium content, exclusive lead generation and investment opportunities.